Sunday, March 29, 2015

March 29th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

West Endzone From 1942

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the 1942 season and shows the Tigers coming onto the field for warm ups from the West Endzone.

As you can see from the picture, the West Endzone has dramatically changed over the years, becoming the showcase of Memorial Stadium.

I also like this picture because it has a bit of mystery to it. If you look closely, it appears that there is a shadowy figure in the tree almost center of the picture. It almost looks like a person!

What do you think?  Person or not?

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Saturday, March 28, 2015

March 28th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

What A Difference 9 Years Make

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos span 1952 to 1961, which included a dramatic change at Clemson.

The above photo was taken around 1952, when Clemson was still an all-male Military College. You can take note of the Trustee House in the background and the partial view of the second barracks on the right.

Fast forward just 9 years and you see the same photo location, but dramatically different culture at Clemson. In 1961, Clemson was no longer a Military College and it was no longer all-male.


One note from the two pictures…notice that the chimneys on the Trustee House are gone in the 1961 photo. I wonder where they went??!!

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Friday, March 27, 2015

March 27th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Howard

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Howard, taken in the 1950’s.

Frank Howard is Clemson University's most memorable football coaches, and worthy of his nickname as, “The Legend”.

A native of Barlow Bend, Alabama, he coached at Clemson for 39 years, thirty as head coach, stepping down in 1969. His legendary 1948 Tigers went undefeated and beat Missouri in the 1949 Gator Bowl, which was the bowl's first sell-out, and that game ensured the future success of the Gator Bowl. It was Clemson's first perfect season since 1900.

His colorful persona, and penchant for imaginative language and improbable stories made him Clemson's most recognizable figure and representative until his death.

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Thursday, March 26, 2015

March 25th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Riggs Field

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of Riggs Field during a football game, taken sometime around the mid 1930’s.

The below photo shows the type of photographic equipment that was used back in the 1930s. Once again this is taken on Riggs Field. Given that this was done around the time of the depression, I guess they did the best they could with the funds available, often with mixed results.


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Wednesday, March 25, 2015

March 26th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tree Rollins


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of Tree Rollins during his time at Clemson in the late 1970’s.

Tree Rollins real name is Wayne Monte Rollins, but everyone called him Tree. At a height of seven foot one, it's easy to see why. Tree was also the first Clemson athlete to have their jersey retired.


Wayne Monte "Tree" Rollins (born June 16, 1955, in Winter Haven, Florida) played 18 seasons in the National Basketball Association for the Atlanta Hawks, Cleveland Cavaliers, Detroit Pistons, Houston Rockets and Orlando Magic. He was primarily known under his playing name, Tree.

The 7-foot-1-inch 275 pound Clemson graduate played center, and gained high esteem for his defense, particularly his rebounding and shot-blocking ability. He finished in the top three in blocked shots six times, leading the league during the 1982-83 NBA season.


At the time of his retirement in 1995, he was fourth all-time in career blocked shots, behind only Hakeem Olajuwon, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Mark Eaton. He currently holds the seventh highest total of career blocked shots, with 2,542.

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