National Champions

National Champions

Monday, April 24, 2017

April 24th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Howard’s Rock In 1980’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is a unique photo of Howard’s Rock in the mid 1980’s as the Tigers prepare to run down the hill. Notice the gloves on the offensive lineman…something that was very common during this era.

In the early 1960s, the rock was given to then head coach Frank Howard by a friend, Samuel Columbus Jones (Clemson Class of 1919). On September 24, 1966, the first time Clemson players ran by the rock and the Tigers beat conference rival Virginia, 40-35.

Howard, seizing on the motivational potential of "The Rock", told his players, "Give me 110% or keep your filthy hands off of my rock."

The team started rubbing the Rock for the first game of 1967, which was a 23-6 waxing of ACC foe Wake Forest.

It is now a tradition for the Clemson Army ROTC to "protect" the Rock for the 24 hours prior to the Clemson-South Carolina game when held in Death Valley. ROTC cadets keep a steady drum cadence around the rock prior to the game, which can be heard across the campus. Part of the tradition comes after unknown parties vandalized the Rock prior to the 1992 Carolina-Clemson game.

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Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Sunday, April 23, 2017

April 23rd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Wannamaker Hall In Mid 1940’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Wannamaker Hall taken just after World War II.

One striking note from the photo is the number of cars parked. Prior to the WWII, very few Clemson students had access to cars. But as cadets came home from Europe and the Pacific, they were settling into homes and purchasing cars at a rapid pace. Obviously, parking was an issue at Clemson in the mid 1940’s as it is today!

Wannamaker Hall is a 1930s-era residence hall that was originally named Barracks #7. It is the northwesterly-most of the five halls that make up the Greek Quad on the West Campus of Clemson University. The building's back side faces Historic Riggs Field.

Completed in 1936 as a new barracks to house cadets of Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina, the architect was the J. E. Sirrine Company, with Clemson professor Rudolph E. Lee as consulting architect. A complete renovation of Wannamaker Hall was undertaken in 2005, with Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas, architects.

The structure is named for John Edward Wannamaker, a Life Trustee of Clemson Agricultural College, and the last surviving member of the Board of Trustees named in the will of Thomas Green Clemson. In 1929, he was elected President of the Board, replacing the recently deceased Alan Johnstone of Newberry, South Carolina.

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Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Saturday, April 22, 2017

April 22nd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Loggia At Clemson


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of the Loggia design of Johnstone Hall, a unique architectural design of its era.

The Loggia was built as a focal point to the rather unusual architectural style that was incorporated in the design of Johnstone Hall. The Loggia was located at approximately the same location as the old Second Barracks sat for so many years and was built in the 1950’s.

One of the more unusual features in the design of the Loggia, was its ceiling. The honeycomb design is different than any other building at Clemson.


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Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Friday, April 21, 2017

April 21st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

More Funny Photos Through The Years


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are a humorous look at Clemson through the eyes of some photographers and students that had a nice sense of humor.

The above picture is of Frank Howard cutting up at a pep rally prior to a football game.

The next photo is from Johnstone Hall in the 1960’s.


The final picture helps answer the age old question of what really is in the mystery meat at Schilletter!


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Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Thursday, April 20, 2017

April 20th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Death Valley Sunset In 1983

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is a unique sunset picture taken shortly after the completion of the North Upper Deck.

I can confirm it is just after the construction of the North Upper Deck because you can see that the “Tigers” is not painted on the upper deck seats yet. The North Upper Deck was completed in 1983 and I believe the “Tigers” script was painted in 1984. That would date the picture sometime in the summer of 1983.

A couple of notes regarding expansion of Memorial Stadium through the years: In 1958, 18,000 sideline seats were added to Memorial Stadium and in 1960, 5,658 west end zone seats were added in response to increasing attendance. The original cedar wood seating was replaced in 1972 by aluminum seats.

As attendance continued to skyrocket, an upper deck was added to each side of the stadium. The south upper deck (Top Deck South) was added in 1978 and the north upper deck (Top Deck North) in 1983. This put the total capacity over 80,000, which made it one of the largest on campus stadiums in the United States.

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Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com