Monday, April 20, 2015

April 20th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Death Valley Sunset In 1983

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is a unique sunset picture taken shortly after the completion of the North Upper Deck.

I can confirm it is just after the construction of the North Upper Deck because you can see that the “Tigers” is not painted on the upper deck seats yet. The North Upper Deck was completed in 1983 and I believe the “Tigers” script was painted in 1984. That would date the picture sometime in the summer of 1983.

A couple of notes regarding expansion of Memorial Stadium through the years: In 1958, 18,000 sideline seats were added to Memorial Stadium and in 1960, 5,658 west end zone seats were added in response to increasing attendance. The original cedar wood seating was replaced in 1972 by aluminum seats.

As attendance continued to skyrocket, an upper deck was added to each side of the stadium. The south upper deck (Top Deck South) was added in 1978 and the north upper deck (Top Deck North) in 1983. This put the total capacity over 80,000, which made it one of the largest on campus stadiums in the United States.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter
Tigerpregame on Medium

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Sunday, April 19, 2015

April 19th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Classic Tailgating Car And Fiberglass Tiger



 (Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of a great looking classic car decked out in Tiger Orange!

The above picture was taken on a fall afternoon in Clemson prior to a football game in the mid 1960’s. The car would show up at almost every home football game, and this picture was taken in the Tillman Hall loop.

If you notice, the car has the number ’42 on the side door panel. I believe the significance of the ’42 is to honor the class of 1942 and their 25th Anniversary of graduation (which would have been in 1967).

Below is a black and white picture taken of the car with member of the class of 1942 standing beside it. Worth notice from this class of students…almost all of them upon graduation would have entered the service and fought in World War II, which we had just entered in December of 1941 (just 4 months before the Class of ’42 graduated). Therefore, this picture may represent a majority of that depleted Class of ’42, many of which perished fighting for our nation.


After posting the blog last June with the above photo, I received an email from Terry Pierce who updated me on the current location of the fiberglass Tiger that was seen above the classic Clemson car from the 1960’s that was posted in the original blog. Terry sent me some updated pictures of the Tiger and here is the excerpt from his email:

The story behind the Tiger comes from the late Ruby Ellenburg. Mrs. Ruby Ellenburg, who lived on Flat Rock Road in Liberty, bought the Tiger in the late sixties or early seventies for her daughter-in-law Brenda who is a Clemson grad. Brenda wasn't impressed so Ruby stuck it under the bushes in front of her house where only its head was visible. There it stayed until 2007.


My in-laws lived next door to the Ellenburg’s and during a visit my wife decided she just had to have that Tiger so she called Brenda who was glad to be rid of it. So we cleaned it up, loaded it into the SUV and took it home to Lenoir City, Tennessee.

The Tiger is fiberglass and at one time had wooden fangs. Unfortunately, although overall it survived thirty years outdoors relatively unscathed, all but one of its fangs have rotted away and only the nails that they were attached to remain.


Also it had a wooden base but it was in pretty bad shape so we removed it too. Now he just prowls my basement and the cat plays on him! I wish I knew more about who Ruby bought the Tiger from but unfortunately no one thought to ask her before she passed.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter
Tigerpregame on Medium

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Saturday, April 18, 2015

April 18th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tillman Hall In The Snow-1940’s

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the 1940’s and shows a beautiful Bowman Field and Tillman Hall after a fresh winter snow.

In this photo, Tillman Hall was just becoming Tillman Hall. Prior to 1946, the building was called the Main Building. This was the case for the first half of the twentieth century.

The building was formally named Tillman Hall in honor of Governor Benjamin Tillman, one of the seven original trustees of Clemson, by the Board of Trustees at their meeting in the first week of July, 1946.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter
Tigerpregame on Medium

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Friday, April 17, 2015

April 17th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Snow Storm Fun From 1970’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today we will step back to the 1970’s and a snowstorm that hit Clemson and provided some fun for Clemson students when classes were cancelled.

The above photo shows some students using their “talents” to make two snowmen. In the background, you can see students sledding down the hill leading up to the Clemson House. It was not uncommon for students to “borrow” dining treys from a dining hall to use as a sled.


The next picture is a typical photo anytime you have snow and kids. An old fashion snowball fight was due to break out anytime you had a snow.


In this next picture, you can see someone has tied a rope to the back of the car in an effort to provide a pull a sled through campus.

And the final picture today is of some enterprising Clemson students who poured water down the driveway outside of Johnstone Hall. With the cold temperatures, the water froze and provided a slick track to slide down to pass the time one evening.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter
Tigerpregame on Medium

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Thursday, April 16, 2015

April 16th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Little 372 and John Logan Marshall



(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of Little 372, a plan born out of the imagination and skill of a Clemson legend, John Logan Marshall.

John Logan Marshall was born in Greenwood in 1885 and graduated from Clemson in 1909 with a B.S. in mechanical and electrical engineering. After working several years on a farm in Alabama and then at Western Electric in Chicago, Ill., Marshall returned to Clemson in 1917 as shop work instructor.

School administrators quickly took notice of Marshall's talents as an educator and, in 1919, named him an assistant professor. Two years later, he was appointed head of Clemson's wood shop.

Under Marshall’s guidance, several of his students began the Clemson Aero Club in 1927. Known today as the Clemson University Flying Club, it's one of the oldest continuous student organizations on campus.


In 1928, Marshall and seven students from the Aero Club built a single-engine, high-wing airplane that they named Little 372. The plane, made of lumber from Marshall's wood shop, had a wingspan of 23 feet and a 16-foot woodenframed, fabric fuselage. Although it was able to fly only 15-20 feet off the ground, it was much more capable than the students had ever imagined.

Following several student walkouts at Clemson during the 1920s, Marshall's passion and dedication became instrumental in improving student morale. After many lengthy wood shop discussions with his students about the importance of Clemson's future, he organized the Tiger Brotherhood society in 1928. The society, established to help protect and uphold the ideals of Clemson, is still vital today.

Little 372, thought to be the first plane built by college students in the United States, currently hangs in the S.C. State Museum.


The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter
Tigerpregame on Medium

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Credit to Clemson Chronicles