National Champions

National Champions

Saturday, March 31, 2012

March 31st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Unique Pictures Of Military In 1950’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Of all the photos Alan uploaded that I saved, this one may be one of the most bizarre. The picture is from the 1950’s and is a young lady eating ice cream at the top of a light tank that was parked in the shadows of Memorial Stadium.

I have no idea what the purpose of this photo is, but it is strange for sure! I’m sure it was a promotion for either the military ROTC at Clemson or the ice cream…but I just don’t know which one!

What I like about the picture is the view of Memorial Stadium before the lower deck expansions. You can see the West Endzone Scoreboard above and to the right of the young lady’s head.

This view is not too far away from where we do the Tiger Pregame Show and Tiger Tailgate Show on the Lawn at Littlejohn today. My best guess is that this picture is on what we now call the Avenue Of Champions Road which runs between current day Littlejohn Coliseum and Lot 5.

When Memorial Stadium was first built, this area to the right in the picture was a forest. So my guess is that this photo was taken a little later in the 1950’s, possibly as late as 1958.

So what were the tanks doing in Clemson? I really don’t know. But the tanks show up in several pictures from that era. Below is a picture of a Lieutenant on a tank with the Clemson “chimney stack” behind him. I estimate that this picture was taken somewhere around Union Drive near what is now Holmes Hall.


And the Army ROTC group was known to roll around on a tank every now and then, as evidence by the picture below. I wonder if these guys are completing a pledge prank or if they are on their way to see the Tigers play?!
(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Broadcast Info, Recap, and Notes For Tiger Baseball

Broadcast Information, Recap, and Notes For Baseball Weekend Series Vs. Miami
By Scott Rhymer
scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tigerpregame via Twitter
The Tiger Pregame Show via Facebook
Clemson vs. Miami...Tigers Take Game 1

Tiger Baseball, and the Road To Omaha, continues today as Clemson hosts Miami.

The radio broadcast for the weekend series will be provided by the Clemson Tiger Sports Network, including the Flagship Station for Clemson Sports, WCCP 104.9 FM. You can listen via the radio or stream the audio from http://www.wccpfm.com/. Saturday’s game will be televised live by ESPNU, while the game on Sunday will be available via webcast on ESPN3.

If you do not have access to a computer or radio, you can download the Tune In App (it is free) for your Droid, Blackberry, or IPhone/IPad and choose WCCP 104.9 FM. This will allow you to stream the audio from the game on your smart phone.

Don Munson will give play by play for all three games with Bob Mahoney offering color analysis.

Saturday’s broadcast time is 3:30 with first pitch at 4:00.

Broadcast time for Sunday’s game is 11:30 with first pitch at 12:00.

Relievers Matt Campbell and Scott Firth combined to allow only one hit, no runs, and no walks with nine strikeouts in the final 5.2 innings pitched to lead Clemson to a 3-1 victory over #7 Miami (FL) at Doug Kingsmore Stadium on Friday night.

The Tigers, who took a 1-0 lead in the series, improved to 13-12 overall and 4-6 in the ACC. The Hurricanes fell to 20-6 overall and 7-3 in ACC play. It was the first meeting between the two since 2009.

The Tigers scored a run in the first inning, then Miami tied the score with a run in the second inning. The two teams were both scoreless during the next three frames until the sixth inning, when Clemson scored the game's final two runs. Meanwhile, Campbell and Firth limited a Hurricane squad that entered the game with a .300 batting average to only one hit in the final six innings.

Campbell (1-2) established career highs for innings pitched (4.0) and strikeouts (7) to earn the win. He gave up just one hit, no runs, and no walks. Firth recorded his first career save by tossing 1.2 perfect innings with two strikeouts. Kevin Brady, Campbell, and Firth combined for 13 strikeouts and did not allow a Hurricane leadoff batter of an inning to reach base.


Miami starter Eric Erickson (4-3) suffered the loss. In 6.0 innings pitched, he yielded seven hits, three runs, and two walks with six strikeouts.


Clemson and Miami (FL) have met 54 times on the baseball diamond, with the Hurricanes holding a 28-25-1 advantage in the series dating back to the 1977 season. Since the Hurricanes joined the ACC for the 2005 season, the Tigers lead the series 12-7.
The two teams did not meet in 2010 or 2011.

Clemson also holds a 10-6 advantage in ACC regular-season games. Jack Leggett has a 17-16 record against Miami as Clemson’s head coach, including an 9-4 mark at Doug Kingsmore Stadium.


In game-two, the Hurricanes will send out junior righthander Eric Whaley (3-1, 2.21 ERA) on the mound. The Pompano Beach, FL native has made six starts for a total of 36.2 innings pitched. He has surrendered 37 hits (.257 opponents’ batting average) and seven walks with 29 strikeouts.


Clemson will counter with junior righty Dominic Leone (3-2, 6.08 ERA) on Saturday. The Norwich, CT native has made six starts for a total of 26.2 innings pitched. He has allowed 22 hits (.239 opponents’ batting average) and 17 walks with 19 strikeouts.


In game-three, Miami will start junior lefty Steven Ewing (3-0, 2.23 ERA) on the mound. The Orlando, FL native has made six starts and one relief appearance for a total of 40.1 innings pitched. He has allowed 35 hits (.238 opponents’ batting average) and 11 walks with 37 strikeouts.


The Tigers will counter with sophomore righthander Kevin Pohle (3-1, 1.88 ERA) on Sunday. The Saint Louis, MO native has made four starts and two relief appearances for a total of 28.2 innings pitched. He has given up 29 hits (.266 opponents’ batting average) and 12 walks with 20 strikeouts.

Go Tigers!

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Credit To Clemsontigers.com

Friday, March 30, 2012

March 30th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

The Midnight Man Filmed In Clemson


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from a time when Clemson’s campus became a movie set back in 1973. In fact, Clemson was not “Clemson”…it was “Jordan College”.

The filming of “The Midnight Man” took place in Clemson and was filmed at various parts of the campus, including the President’s House.

Burt Lancaster co-wrote and co-directed the film in addition to playing the lead role. It received an R rating and was released in 1974.

Lancaster arrives at "Jordan College" stepping off a Trailways Silver Eagle model 01 bus (actually Greyhound served Clemson) on the Old Greenville Highway in front of what was Clemson's post office, a classic 1930s design building that was replicated all over the country and which is now Clemson University's Mell Hall.

This was the first scene shot, filmed on February 13, 1973. The "Clemons Motel" was a clever reworking of the sign of the still-operating Clemson Motel on Highway 93 mid-way between Clemson and Central, South Carolina.

The interior courthouse shots were inside Tillman Hall, visible in the background of early shots, but when Lancaster and Susan Clark step outside they are suddenly in downtown Anderson, South Carolina. The bar where Lancaster accosts Catherine Bach's character was also in Anderson and after filming, a plywood board was tacked over the "b" to eliminate the set building's faux-identity. It stayed that way until the corner building was razed in the 1980's.

William Splawn's character of Mr. Lamar was a name of convenience as Lamar's was a real nightspot (always referred to by Dr. Calhoun in his English classes as "The Round Table") on Highway 123 (the then so-called by-pass, now named Tiger Boulevard) across the road from Clemson's Southern Railway train station. It is now Coach Ibrahim M. Ibrahim's Athletic Department.


Cameron Mitchell's character is seen in a late scene exercising on the cinder track of historic Riggs Field, the second football field until Memorial Stadium was built in 1942 and which is now the soccer stadium.

The indoor swimming pool scene was shot in the YMCA building visible to the right of Riggs Field. The janitor's crash-pad was also in the basement of the "Y", now known as Holtzendorff Hall, in what would later serve as the band director's office. The Clemson Tiger Band's band room would occupy this space from 1977 until 1992.

One whole scene is sometimes excised for broadcast in which Mitchell's character follows Senator Claiborne onto a Welborn bus. This was filmed in Anderson at what was once the Piedmont & Northern interurban railway station at 415 North Main Street and was by that time a Trailways bus station and which now serves as The Jones Law Firm. (The last P&N passenger interurban service to the station ended on October 31, 1951.)

Interior dorm room scenes were filmed at the Trustee House, the two-story red brick building adjacent to Fort Hill, the John C. Calhoun mansion on campus - Calhoun's son-in-law Thomas Green Clemson donated the estate to South Carolina to form Clemson's land grant campus in 1889. The carpeting laid down for the filming was still in use in the Trustee House in 2005. It was finally replaced in 2007.

Burt Lancaster shared directing credit with Roland Kibbee, and shared writing credit with Kibbee and author David Anthony upon whose novel The Midnight Lady and the Morning Man the movie was based. Featuring a fairly convoluted plot, the movie was not a major success and Lancaster did not consider it to be among his better work. Other than The Kentuckian, this was Lancaster's only film as a director.

Co-stars included Susan Clark and Cameron Mitchell, as well as the future Daisy Duke, Catherine Bach, in her first screen appearance, and character actors Ed Lauter and Charles Tyner who would both be featured in The Longest Yard (the 1974 original, not the 2005 remake).

The film was released in the United States on June 10, 1974 in New York City, and nationwide on June 14. It premiered at the Astro III theatre, Clemson, S.C., on March 14, 1974 with a red carpet ceremony.


(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com


Credit to clemsontigers.com, clemsonwiki and wikipedia.

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Broadcast Info For Tiger Baseball Vs. Miami

Broadcast Information For Baseball Weekend Series Vs. Miami
By Scott Rhymer
scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tigerpregame via Twitter
The Tiger Pregame Show via Facebook
Clemson vs. Miami

Tiger Baseball, and the Road To Omaha, continues today as Clemson hosts Miami.

The radio broadcast for the weekend series will be provided by the Clemson Tiger Sports Network, including the Flagship Station for Clemson Sports, WCCP 104.9 FM. You can listen via the radio or stream the audio from http://www.wccpfm.com/. Saturday’s game will be televised live by ESPNU, while the games on Friday and Sunday will be available via webcast on ESPN3.

If you do not have access to a computer or radio, you can download the Tune In App (it is free) for your Droid, Blackberry, or IPhone/IPad and choose WCCP 104.9 FM. This will allow you to stream the audio from the game on your smart phone.

Don Munson will give play by play for all three games with Bob Mahoney offering color analysis.

Broadcast time for Friday's game is 6:00 with first pitch at 6:30.

Saturday’s broadcast time is 3:30 with first pitch at 4:00.

Broadcast time for Sunday’s game is 11:30 with first pitch at 12:00

Clemson and Miami (FL) have met 53 times on the baseball diamond, with the Hurricanes holding a 28-24-1 advantage in the series dating back to the 1977 season. Since the Hurricanes joined the ACC for the 2005 season, the Tigers lead the series 11-7.
The two teams did not meet in 2010 or 2011.

Their last matchups came in a three-game series at Doug Kingsmore Stadium in 2009. Miami won the first game 12-8, then the Tigers won the final two games by scores of 9-1 and 9-3. The Tigers hold a 9-6 lead over the Hurricanes in games played at Clemson, all of which have been played at Doug Kingsmore Stadium.

Clemson also holds a 9-6 advantage in ACC regular-season games. Jack Leggett has a 16-16 record against Miami as Clemson’s head coach, including an 8-4 mark at Doug Kingsmore Stadium. Leggett was 0-1 against Miami as head coach at Western Carolina, meaning he is 16-17 all-time against the Hurricanes.Virginia’s pitching rotation for the series has yet to be determined.

In game-one, Miami will start graduate lefthander Eric Erickson (4-2, 3.23 ERA) on the mound. The Sarasota, FL native has made six starts for a total of 39.0 innings pitched. He has surrendered 40 hits (.270 opponents’ batting average) and two walks with 33 strikeouts. The Tigers will counter with junior righthander Kevin Brady (1-2, 2.97 ERA) on Friday. The Gaithersburg, MD native has made six starts for a total of 30.1 innings pitched. He has allowed 27 hits (.245 opponents’ batting average) and 10 walks with 33 strikeouts.


In game-two, the Hurricanes will send out junior righthander Eric Whaley (3-1, 2.21 ERA) on the mound. The Pompano Beach, FL native has made six starts for a total of 36.2 innings pitched. He has surrendered 37 hits (.257 opponents’ batting average) and seven walks with 29 strikeouts. Clemson will counter with junior righty Dominic Leone (3-2, 6.08 ERA) on Saturday. The Norwich, CT native has made six starts for a total of 26.2 innings pitched. He has allowed 22 hits (.239 opponents’ batting average) and 17 walks with 19 strikeouts.


In game-three, Miami will start junior lefty Steven Ewing (3-0, 2.23 ERA) on the mound. The Orlando, FL native has made six starts and one relief appearance for a total of 40.1 innings pitched. He has allowed 35 hits (.238 opponents’ batting average) and 11 walks with 37 strikeouts. The Tigers will counter with sophomore righthander Kevin Pohle (3-1, 1.88 ERA) on Sunday. The Saint Louis, MO native has made four starts and two relief appearances for a total of 28.2 innings pitched. He has given up 29 hits (.266 opponents’ batting average) and 12 walks with 20 strikeouts.

Go Tigers!

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Credit To Clemsontigers.com

March 29th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Frank Howard Prowling The Sideline In 1955


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of head coach Frank Howard roaming the sideline during the 1955 season. This photo is a bit iconic in that I think most Clemson fans envision Coach Howard in very much the image of this picture.

Seeing Coach Howard in this pose reminds me of the massive figurative shadow he cast over the football program at Clemson, not only while he was on the sideline, but even later after his retirement from coaching.

If you are looking for a little conspiracy in the picture, take a look at the gentleman that is sitting on the front row above #85 of the Tigers.

If you think that "fan" looks a bit like Joe Paterno, you are not the alone!

In 1955, Paterno was an assistant coach at Penn State, but I can’t find any reason based on the two teams schedules that would make me think Paterno was in Clemson scouting an opponent. But it certainly is a close enough resemblence to do a double take.

Charlie Bussey was the Clemson quarterback on the 1955 team, and he was teamed up with Joel Wells and Billy O’Dell in the backfield to give Clemson three dynamic weapons on the ground.

Clemson would finish the 1955 season 7-3 overall and 3-1 in the ACC. This was good enough for 3rd in the ACC. Clemson was in the process of moving away from a Military college to a non-military college

From a national perspective, the fall of 1955 had some very big moments in television and movie industry while the Tigers were on the football field.

On September 10, 1955, the long-running program Gunsmoke debuts on the CBS-TV network.

On the evening of September 30, actor James Dean was killed when his automobile collides with another car at a highway junction near Cholame, California. Dean is just 24 years old at his death.

On October 2 , Alfred Hitchcock Presents TV program debuts on the NBC-TV network in the United States.

And on October 3, The Mickey Mouse Club TV program debuts on the ABC-TV network in the United States.

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com


Credit to clemsontigers.com and wikipedia.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

March 28th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

The Esso Club


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts and Scott Rhymer)

Today’s photos include a view from the press box inside Memorial Stadium and is of Brent Musburger wearing an Esso Club hat. Musburger is a noted fan of both Clemson, and of the Esso Club.

The Esso Club is a sports bar in Clemson, South Carolina, that evolved from a 1920s gas station and grocery on Old Greenville Highway, what was at the time the main highway between Atlanta, Georgia and Greenville, South Carolina.

As local historians note, the corporate trademark change to Exxon went unnoticed by local patrons and the original Esso oval sign is still displayed out front. The business stopped pumping gas in the winter of 1985 and now soldiers on as a nationally recognized sports bar.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution described it as the best bar in the South.

ESPN The Magazine picked the Esso Club as their top pick for college sports bars, and "patrons can taste-test the beer in a niche dubbed the 'Educational Corner'".

ABC sportscaster Brent Musburger makes it a point to have a beer at the Esso when in town for Clemson football and basketball games. The authors of South Carolina Off the Beaten Path suggest going to the Esso Club to get tickets to games that are sold out years in advance, rather than the stadium.

The memorabilia in the Esso Club has been described "cool enough to qualify as museum quality." A letter from Billy Carter, brother of President Jimmy Carter, is in the archives.

The Esso Club possesses the oldest beer license in town, dating to December 1933, immediately after the 21st Amendment went into effect on December 5. The main bar is topped with the original cedar seating from Death Valley, Clemson's football stadium.

Traditionalists raised their eyebrows when new owners introduced a liquor license to the traditional beer joint for the first time in 2003 but a peaceful transition was made. For years the closest business to the stadium, the Esso Club is a favorite among the Clemson loyal.

This summer, my wife and I traveled Europe. While in Berchtesgaden, Germany (just outside of Salzburg, Austria) we ran into this sign on the way to Adolph Hitler’s Eagles Nest.

It goes to show you that you never know when you are going to run into something that reminds you of Clemson.

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com


Credit to clemsontigers.com and wikipedia.

Broadcast Information For Tiger Baseball vs. Presbyterian

By Scott Rhymer
scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tigerpregame via Twitter
The Tiger Pregame Show via Facebook

Tiger Baseball, and the Road To Omaha, continues today as Clemson hosts Presbyterian at Doug Kingsmore Stadium.

The radio broadcast for tonight will be provided exclusively by the Flagship Station for Clemson Sports, WCCP 104.9 FM. You can listen via the radio or stream the audio from http://www.wccpfm.com/

If you do not have access to a computer or radio, you can download the Tune In App (it is free) for your Droid, Blackberry, or IPhone/IPad and choose WCCP 104.9 FM. This will allow you to stream the audio from the game on your smart phone.

Roy Philpott will give play by play for Wednesday's game with Scott Rhymer offering color analysis. You can reach Roy and Scott during the game at their respective Twitter sites:@royphilpott and @Tigerpregame

Broadcast time for Wednesday's game is 6:00 with first pitch at 6:30.

Clemson and Presbyterian College have met 80 times on the diamond, with the Tigers holding a 60-20 lead in the series dating to 1906. In 2011, the Blue Hose topped the Tigers 4-3 at Greenville, SC, then Clemson responded with a 7-2 victory at Doug Kingsmore Stadium.


In 2010, the Tigers beat Presbyterian College 8-2 at Doug Kingsmore Stadium. In 2009, the Tigers won 8-0, and in 2008 at Fluor Field in Greenville, SC, the Tigers topped the Blue Hose 12-7.
Prior to that contest, the two teams had not met since the 1950 season, when Clemson won both meetings by scores of 15-2 at Presbyterian College and 11-10 (10 innings) in Tigertown.

The Tigers own a 35-7 advantage over the Blue Hose in games played at Clemson, while Clemson leads 3-0 at Doug Kingsmore Stadium.
Jack Leggett has a 4-1 record against Presbyterian College as Clemson’s head coach, including a 3-0 record at Doug Kingsmore Stadium.


Presbyterian College, led by eighth-year Head Coach Elton Pollock, enters Wednesday’s game at Clemson with a 9-17 overall record and an 0-6 Big South Conference mark after being swept at Virginia Military over the weekend.


Presbyterian College, who has lost seven games in a row after it had won eight of its previous nine games, is 4-12 on opponents’ home fields in 2012. Presbyterian College is averaging 4.4 runs per game and hitting .265 with a .362 slugging percentage and .335 on-base percentage thanks to 81 walks and 20 hit-by-pitches against 189 strikeouts. The team has also totaled 38 doubles, one triple, 16 home runs, and 26 stolen bases in 35 attempts.


Billy Motroni leads the team with a .329 batting average, while Jay Lizanich is hitting .326 with three stolen bases. Kenny Bryant is batting .319 with a team-high four homers and 13 RBIs. Andrew Williams has added three long balls and 13 RBIs, while Nathan Chong has a team-high six stolen bases.

The pitching staff has a 6.04 ERA and .305 opponents’ batting average along with 157 strikeouts against 95 walks in 226.2 innings pitched.


Senior righty Gabe Grammer has all six of the team’s saves along with a 5.19 ERA and 12 strikeouts in 8.2 innings pitched over nine relief appearances. Presbyterian College, who has allowed 32 steals in 39 attempts, is fielding at a .966 clip as well.


Go Tigers!

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

March 27th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tree Rollins Excites Littlejohn In 1977


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from January 19th, 1977 as Littlejohn Coliseum is packed to the rafters for a basketball game against Maryland.

Clemson fans, excited about the 1977 basketball season, were even more excited to see Tree Rollins in his senior year. As you can see from the first picture, this game was televised by NBC and had the Clemson faithful fired up. Clemson would win the game 93-71. The Tigers would go on to defeat Duke in the first round of the ACC Tournament in March before falling to Virginia in the 2nd round.

The seven foot one inch Wayne "Tree" Rollins was an Associated Press third team All-American in his senior year. Rollins established 10 individual Clemson records for shot blocking, rebounding, and field goal accuracy.

He also established an NCAA mark for starting 110 consecutive games and was the first Clemson athlete to have his jersey retired.

Rollins is one of the Clemson basketball program's most famous alumni. He dominated inside play on the hardwood for the Tigers from 1973 to 1977 and was an intimidating and prolific shot blocker and rebounder.


Behind Rollins' forceful play, the Tigers improved each year he was on the team. Over his career, Rollins averaged a double-double for four straight seasons (the only Clemson player to do so). He was a three-time second-team All-ACC selection and a third-team All-American in 1976-77 (the first Clemson basketball player to earn a spot on an AP All-American team). At the conclusion of his career, he had started in a then-record 110 straight games for Clemson.

His career numbers at Clemson easily speak for themselves. He is Clemson's career rebounding leader with 1,311 and still ranks fifth in ACC history. He is the third ranked player in ACC history with 450 blocked shots, however he is first on a per game basis. He is ranked fourth in career double-doubles at Clemson with 85 and is one of only two Clemson players in history to record a triple-double (twice doing it with blocked shots).

After leaving Clemson, he was drafted with the 14th overall pick of the 1977 NBA Draft by the Atlanta Hawks. Playing 11 seasons with the Hawks, Rollins ranks fourth in club history in rebounding, first in blocked shots, and third in games played.

He was the first Clemson athlete to have his jersey retired, as his number-30 was placed in the rafters prior to his final home game. A member of the ACC's 50-Year Anniversary team, Rollins was inducted into the Clemson Hall of Fame in 1987.

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com


Monday, March 26, 2012

Broadcasting Information For Mid-Week Games

By Scott Rhymer
scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tigerpregame via Twitter
The Tiger Pregame Show via Facebook

Tiger Baseball, and the Road To Omaha, continues this week as Clemson travels to Athens today to play Georgia and returns home vs. Presbyterian at Doug Kingsmore Stadium on Wednesday.

The radio broadcast for both games will be provided by the Flagship Station for Clemson Sports, WCCP 104.9 FM. You can listen via the radio or stream the audio from http://www.wccpfm.com/

If you do not have access to a computer or radio, you can download the Tune In App (it is free) for your Droid, Blackberry, or IPhone/IPad and choose WCCP 104.9 FM. This will allow you to stream the audio from the game on your smart phone.

Don Munson will give play by play in Athens tonight with Roy Philpott offering color analysis. Roy Philpott will give play by play for Wednesday's game with Scott Rhymer offering color analysis. You can reach Roy and Scott during the game at their respective Twitter sites:@royphilpott and @Tigerpregame

Broadcast time for Tuesday's game vs. Georgia is 6:30 with first pitch at 7:00 from Foley Field.
Broadcast time for Wednesday's game is 6:00 with first pitch at 6:30.

Tuesday’s game at Georgia will televised live by CSS, while Wednesday’s game against Presbyterian College will be available live via webcast on TigerCast at ClemsonTigers.com. Live stats will be available at ClemsonTigers.com for both games as well.

Clemson and Georgia have met 220 times on the diamond, with Georgia holding a 117-101-2 lead in the series dating back to 1900. The two teams have played at least one game every year since 1959. Georgia is Clemson’s second-most-played rival in history, trailing only South Carolina (298).

Last season, the Tigers won both games of the home-and-home series by scores of 11-5 (in Clemson) and 5-2 (in Athens). In 2010, Clemson also won both games by scores of 15-5 (in Athens) and 14-6 (in Clemson). Therefore, the Tigers have won four games in a row in the series after the Bulldogs had won the previous four meetings. The two teams have not split their season series since the 2006 campaign.


The Bulldogs hold a 68-43 advantage in games played at Georgia. Jack Leggett has a 23-16 record against Georgia as Clemson’s head coach, including a 9-13 record at Foley Field. Leggett was also 3-12 against the Bulldogs as Western Carolina’s head coach, meaning he is 26-28 all-time against Georgia.

Georgia will start freshman righthander David Sosebee (2-0, 0.79 ERA) on the mound. The Cleveland, GA native has made four starts and one relief appearance for a total of 11.1 innings pitched. He has allowed 10 hits (.250 opponents’ batting average) and one walk with one strikeout.

The Tigers will counter with freshman righty Daniel Gossett (1-2, 6.60 ERA) on Tuesday. The Lyman, SC native has made five relief appearances and two starts for a total of 15.0 innings pitched. He has surrendered 15 hits (.259 opponents’ batting average) and seven walks with 18 strikeouts.
Go Tigers!

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

March 26th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Mother’s Day On Bowman Field In 1953
(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

This photo was taken in the last years of Clemson being a military school in the spring of 1953 on Mother's Day. Mother's Day was traditionally a very big event for the cadets and their families.

In 1949 Tiger Brotherhood began a tradition of awarding Mother Of The Year to a Clemson mother during Military presentations on Mother’s Day on Bowman Field. In 1949, the first year of this tradition, Tiger Brotherhood announced that Mrs. P.S. Rochester had been named Clemson's first Mother of the Year.

According to The Tiger newspaper article from May 5, 1949, she was chosen because she had more sons (six) graduate from Clemson than anyone else to that date.

For many years this award was given during the annual Mother's Day celebration and parade which was one of the college's most attended events on campus.

In this picture from 1953, over 12,000 people attended the event. The college dropped its mandatory military status in 1955 and in 1957 the Mother's Day festivities were changes to an all-college open house.

You cas see that Bowman Field, facing from Tillman Hall towards College Avenue, is jam packed full of Cadets and families.

Today, this award is given during a Clemson home game during the football season.

Although the university became a coeducational civilian institution in 1955, it still maintains an active military presence. The university is home to detachments for the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC) as well as a host school for the U.S. Marine Corps PLC program adjacent to the Semper Fi Society.

The C-4 Pershing Rifles have won the national society's drill meet eight times: 1999, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009 and 2011. Company C-4 also performs colorguards, twenty-one-gun salutes, exhibition-drill performances, and POW/MIA ceremonies. Company C-4 performs colorguard performance at the university's home football games. In addition to the C-4 drill company, the university is the former home of the 4th Regimental Headquarters (4RHQ), the National Headquarters for the Junior ROTC level of Pershing Rifles (BlackJacks) and the Co-ed Auxiliary for Pershing Rifles (CAPeRs).

Its Air Force ROTC Detachment 770 "Flyin' Tigers" was selected as the #1 "medium-sized" Air Force ROTC detachment in the nation for 2006 (the "High Flight" and "Right of Line" awards), #1 Detachment in the "Southeast" in 2006 ("medium-sized") and 2007 ("large-sized"), and #1 in the state of South Carolina (out of three — University of South Carolina and The Citadel) three consecutive years (2005, 2006 and 2007).

The university has also developed a group of Marines and Marine Officer Candidates within an organization called the Semper Fi Society. The society is not associated with the ROTC, but can lead to a commission into the U.S. Marine Corps via the Platoon Leaders Course program.

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

credit to clemsontigers.com and clemson.edu.

Sunday, March 25, 2012

March 25th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Earle Hall In The 1960’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today we will look at a series of photos and stories about Earle Hall and the Chemical Enigneering program at Clemson. Today’s first photo is of Earle Hall, taken in the 1960’s.

Earle Hall was built in 1959, and is the first building on campus to be named after a living person. Dedicated as the chemical engineering building in 1959, Earle is home to intense research in chemical and biochemical separations, kinetics and catalysts, molecular modeling and simulation, polymers, fibers and films, and supercritical fluids.

Earle Hall is named for Samuel B. "Sam" Earle, who served Clemson for 40 years as head of the Engineering Department and Experiment Station. He also served as acting president in 1919, as well as in 1924-1925. Sam Earle celebrated his 100th birthday before his death in 1978.

Chemical Engineering was first introduced as a course of study at Clemson in the 1917-1918 academic year. There was no Chemical Engineering department or faculty; the curriculum was drawn from courses in Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Metallurgy, and Economics.

In 1958, Clemson received a grant of $1.175 million from the Olin Foundation to construct a building and purchase chemical engineering equipment. Prof. Littlejohn played a large role in getting Earle Hall built. Prior to 1958, the Olin Foundation limited its building gifts to one per institution; however, Earle Hall was the second building that the Olin Foundation funded at Clemson University.

The groundbreaking ceremony for the Samuel Broadus Earle Building was held on September 27, 1958.

The first Ph.D. in Engineering was awarded to Jerry A. Caskey in 1965, a student under Bill Barlage.

The first female to graduate with a degree in Chemical Engineering from Clemson was Susan Glen Herrington, class of 1970.

On February 2, 2005, the name of the department was changed from the Department of Chemical Engineering to the Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering.

Now to another picture of Earle Hall. In the 1980’s, a humorous prank took place to rearrange the letters on the outside of Earle Hall. Rumor has it that a graduate student was kicked out of school for this prank.


Today, many Clemson fans park in the spaces that are right outside Earle Hall for football games. For some of these fans, they are tailgating directly outside a building that they spent many days coming in and out of while getting their engineering degree.
Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Saturday, March 24, 2012

March 24th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Football At Riggs Field In The 1930’s


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the 1930’s and is of the Clemson Tigers playing an unknown opponent at the original location for football at Clemson…Riggs Field.

Clemson was coached in the 1930’s by Jess Neely. Neely (a former head coach at Rhodes and assistant at Alabama) became Clemson's head football coach. During his tenure. Neely led the Tigers to a 43-35-7 record and his final season at Clemson was the turning point in the Tigers' program.

His team went 9-1 during that season, finishing second to Duke in the Southern Conference. The Tigers also received their first bowl invitation and bowl victory that year, defeating nationally ranked Boston College 6-3 in the 1940 Cotton Bowl Classic. The 1939 Tigers finished with a #12 ranking in the final AP poll.

Clemson also had their first Associated Press All-American that year in Banks McFadden. Jess Neely, along with then athletic director Dr. Rupert Fike, founded the IPTAY Scholarship Fund, which supports the Clemson Athletic Department.

Memorial Stadium (Death Valley) was constructed against the wishes of the late and former Clemson Head Coach Jess Neely. Just before leaving for Rice University after the 1939 season, he told Frank Howard, "Don't ever let them talk you into building a big stadium. Put about 10,000 seats behind the YMCA. That's all you'll ever need."

Despite this, the University decided it was time to build a new stadium. They chose to build in the valley in the western part of campus. On April 3, 1941, the South Carolina General Assembly ratified an act authorizing a $150,000 bond issue for the new stadium, and the bill went to Governor Burnet R. Maybank for signature. The original 20,000 seat stadium was constructed for $125,000 or $6.25 a seat.

The picture from Riggs Field had a grainy quality to it, as would be expected from picture from that era. Here is another picture from the 1930’s showing the type of camera that would have been used for the picture of the Clemson football team on Riggs Field.


Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Friday, March 23, 2012

March 23rd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tigers Come On The Field In 1942


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the 1942 season and the Tigers are coming onto the field from the West Endzone area. Back in those days, Clemson did not run down the hill to enter the stadium.

Before we get into the history of the picture, let’s address a “controversy” with this picture! When people first look at this picture, some notice that it appears like a man is in a tree at the center of the picture up about half way on the tree. Much like Bigfoot photos and JFK Assassination photos, people’s imaginations tend to run wild when looking at a picture very closely.

But, I have to admit, the shadowy figure does look like a person in the tree, despite the fact that it would not make any sense for someone to be in that tree! Look at the picture closer and you make your own judgment!

This picture shows how different the west area of the stadium is today compared to 1942. The field house is clearly visible in the picture. This is where the Clemson and opponent dressing rooms were located (and still located today).

You can also see the wooded area behind the field house in what is now Lot 5. This was a large forest in 1942, but now is home to Lot 5, McFadden Building, Doug Kingsmore Stadium, football practice fields, and the track complex.

Bully Cagle, Butch Butler, Bill Hunter, and Hal Prince were all stars on the 1942 roster, which was depleted because most of the players enlisted in the armed forces and were fighting in WWII. The Tigers would stumble to a 3-6-1 record in 1942, due in large part to the depleted rosters.

It was also noted that many of those that did not (or could not) enlist in the armed forces and remained at Clemson felt a tremendous guilt and anger that they could not go fight for their country. It was almost as if these remaining students and football players were humiliated to be playing a football game while their buddies were in France or the Pacific.

Most of the Clemson students that did not enlist was due to the fact that they failed a physical or some other screening. More than 6,000 Clemson students and alumni served in WWII. 373 died in action with an amazing 57 from the Class of 1941. The Class of 1944 was the smallest class in Clemson history with only 13 graduates.

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Thursday, March 22, 2012

Broadcast Information For Virginia Baseball Series

Broadcast Information For Baseball Weekend Series
By Scott Rhymer
scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tigerpregame via Twitter
The Tiger Pregame Show via Facebook
Tigers At UVA

Tiger Baseball, and the Road To Omaha, continues today as Clemson take to the road in ACC play by traveling to Charlottsville, Virginia.

The radio broadcast for the weekend series will be provided by the Clemson Tiger Sports Network, including the Flagship Station for Clemson Sports, WCCP 104.9 FM. You can listen via the radio or stream the audio from http://www.wccpfm.com/

If you do not have access to a computer or radio, you can download the Tune In App (it is free) for your Droid, Blackberry, or IPhone/IPad and choose WCCP 104.9 FM. This will allow you to stream the audio from the game on your smart phone.

Don Munson will give play by play for all three games with Bob Mahoney offering color analysis

Broadcast time for Saturday’s game is 12:30 with first pitch at 1:00.

Broadcast time for Sunday’s game is 12:30 with first pitch at 1:00

Clemson and Virginia have met 146 times on the diamond, with the Tigers holding a 102-44 lead in the series dating back to the 1955 season. Last year at Doug Kingsmore Stadium, the Cavaliers swept the three-game series, which included two one-run victories. The two teams last met in a three-game series at UVa Baseball Stadium 2010. The Cavaliers won two of three games despite both teams scoring 12 runs in the series.

Virginia has won 15 of the last 16 games in the series after the Tigers won 100 of the first 130 matchups. The Tigers hold a 40-25 lead in games played at Virginia and a 92-38 advantage in ACC regular-season games.
Jack Leggett has a 31-25 record against Virginia as Clemson’s head coach, including a 13-12 mark at UVa Baseball Stadium. Leggett was 2-0 against Virginia as head coach at Vermont, meaning he is 33-24 all-time against the Cavaliers.

Virginia’s pitching rotation for the series has yet to be determined.

Clemson will send out junior righty Dominic Leone (3-1, 5.09 ERA) on Saturday. The Norwich, CT native has made five starts for a total of 23.0 innings pitched. He has given up 17 hits (.218 opponents’ batting average) and 14 walks with 16 strikeouts.
The Tigers will start sophomore righty Kevin Pohle (3-0, 1.09 ERA) on Sunday. The Saint Louis, MO native has made three starts and two relief appearances for a total of 24.2 innings pitched. He has yielded 25 hits (.263 opponents’ batting average) and eight walks with 19 strikeouts.
Go Tigers!

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Credit To Clemsontigers.com

March 22nd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Asia’s Connection To Clemson

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is a poster on a building somewhere in Asia that someone took a picture of and sent to Clemson. The photo eventually ended up in a media guide for Clemson many years ago.

The wall poster is based on a picture that was taken during the 1987 Clemson win over Georgia. The QB for Georgia is James Jackson, and I believe that the defensive player for Clemson is tackle Richard McCullough.

Many people that first see this picture think it is based on the safety that Clemson had late in the game against UGA in 1987 that set up the chance for David Treadwell to kick the game winning field goal.

However, James Lott wore #9 and was a defensive back. The player in this picture is obviously a lineman.

The other mistake that many make when seeing this picture is believing it is an advertisement for the Clemson football game against Wake Forest in the Mirage Bowl in Japan.

Clemson played Wake Forest in 1982, so that would rule out that possibility. However, Clemson played Duke in Japan in 1991. Therefore, it could be possible that this was a picture that previewed that 1991 game in Japan.

Someone posted a while back that the translation of the language had nothing to do with Clemson at all, instead an advertisement for sports photography and color film. Although I don't have the skills to translate the text, I believe this to be the actual meaning of the poster and not a preview of Clemson football.

It goes to show you, very clearly, that you never know when you are going to run into a Clemson connection. I can’t imagine being in Southeast Asia, walking down the street, and coming upon this poster of a Clemson football player!

To watch a youtube video of the 1987 Clemson/Georgia game, click here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2sBCrFCZyQ

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

March 21st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tillman Hall Auditorium In The 1950’s


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is a view of the auditorium inside of Tillman Hall during the 50s. This view is not much different than how it looked right up until the time the auditorium was completely
re-done in the 1980s.

Prior to that renovation, Tillman Hall was built in 1892 remained almost unchanged for 100 years.

In this picture, Clemson was in the last few years of being a Military College. Clemson University was founded in 1889 as a legacy of Thomas Green Clemson, who willed his Fort Hill plantation home, its surrounding farmlands and forest, and other property to the state of South Carolina to establish a technical and scientific institution for the state. Clemson College formally opened in July 1893 with an enrollment of 446. From the beginning, the college was an all-male military school.

It remained this way until 1955 when the change was made to "civilian" status for students and Clemson became a coeducational institution. In 1964 the college was renamed Clemson University as the state Legislature formally recognized the school's expanded academic offerings and research pursuits.

Tillman Auditorium is a large 820 seat auditorium located in Tillman Hall. It is managed through Clemson Major Events and TigerPaw Productions. It hosts university speakers and campus events, ranging from Orientation skits to FCA meetings to Zeta Tau Alpha's Big Man on Campus.

Currently boasting orange stadium-style seats, the auditorium once had much more traditional seating as the Chapel, and hosted Clemson's first graduation ceremonies.

Tillman Hall also has a history of hosting concerts throughout the years. The following groups/artists performed in Tillman Hall:
The Amazing Randi
Dave Brubeck Quartet
Crack the Sky
Dixie Dregs
Goose Creek Symphony
Hydra With Opening act Rock Mountain
James Taylor
Jimmy Buffet
Martin Mull and His Fabulous Furniture
Paul Winter Consort
Peter Yarrow Band
Renaissance
Sea Level

Note: In yesterday’s blog, the picture was of Johnstone Hall. That picture prompted several emails from Clemson alum that had their own stories to tell about Johnstone. As always, feel free to email me additional information about the pictures and stories you see posted and I may use them in future blogs.

CUTIGERTIM is a ’68 graduate of Clemson and lived in Johnstone. Here is what he had to say:
“Wow this is a historic picture. At one time the information window shown was where freshman picked up their football tickets and was the original location of sleeping bags and all night lines. You also paid your "deputy dawg" parking tickets in that location. Another tidbit on the tin cans was that the halls were constructed wide enough for platoon formations thus after the corp was dropped they served an excellent place for "Hall Hockey". You took the wooden chair provided in your room and placed one at each end of the hall. You wrapped a tin of your ROTC shoe polish in electric tape (the puck). You divided into 2 teams and took the broom (Hockey stick) they provided to sweep your VAT tile floors with and depending what wing and floor you were on you might have found a keg on the hall on the weekends. Who said there was no entertainment in Clemson in the old days?! We did not need a Chic-Fil-A. We had Hall Hockey and bottle rocket wars from the ledges of the Tin Cans.”

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Broadcast Info As Tiger Baseball Invades Fluor Field

By Scott Rhymer
scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tigerpregame via Twitter
The Tiger Pregame Show via Facebook

Tiger Baseball, and the Road To Omaha, continues today as Clemson plays Elon at Fluor Field in Greenville, SC.

The radio broadcast for today will be provided exclusively by the Flagship Station for Clemson Sports, WCCP 104.9 FM. You can listen via the radio or stream the audio from http://www.wccpfm.com/

If you do not have access to a computer or radio, you can download the Tune In App (it is free) for your Droid, Blackberry, or IPhone/IPad and choose WCCP 104.9 FM. This will allow you to stream the audio from the game on your smart phone.

Roy Philpott will give play by play for today's game with Scott Rhymer offering color analysis. You can reach Roy and Scott during the game at their respective Twitter sites:@royphilpott and @Tigerpregame

Broadcast time for Wednesday's game is 4:30 with first pitch at 5:00.

Clemson and Elon have met 19 times (all at Clemson) on the diamond, with the Tigers holding a 13-7 lead in the series. The Tigers also lead 13-6 in games played at Doug Kingsmore Stadium.

Last night, Steve Wilkerson went 4-for-4 at the plate and three Tiger pitchers combined to allow only two runs and one walk with 11 strikeouts in Clemson's 6-2 win over Elon at Doug Kingsmore Stadium. The Tigers, who took a 1-0 lead in the two-game series, improved to 10-8 on the season. The Phoenix dropped to 12-9.

Tonight, the Tigers will be the designated home team and occupy the 1st base dugout.
In game two, Elon will start sophomore Jim Stokes (1-2, 2.70 ERA) on the mound. The 6’7” righthander from Royersford, PA has made four starts and one relief appearance for a total of 16.2 innings pitched. He has allowed 11 hits (.204 opponents’ batting average) and 14 walks with 12 strikeouts.

The Tigers will counter with freshman righthander Daniel Gossett (0-2, 10.12 ERA) on Wednesday. The Spartanburg native has made six appearances (1 start) for a total of 8 innings pitched. He has yielded 12 hits (.353 opponents’ batting average) and five walks with eight strikeouts.

Go Tigers!


Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

March 20th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Johnstone Hall Early 1970’s


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today's photo was taken in the early 70s showing the information desk in the plaza area of Johnstone Hall.

Johnstone Hall is a dormitory that has housed several generations of Clemson undergraduates. Located on west campus, it originally overlooked the student laundry, the coal-burning Physical Plant and the university fire department, and beyond that the stadium and Lake Hartwell.

Johnstone Hall is named for an original Clemson trustee and, later, chairman of the board, Alan Johnstone, (served 1890–1894, 1905-1929.) Although it had sections A through F, all that remains today is section A and an annex.

Erected in 1954, the Johnstone Hall complex design became a model for college dormitories, implementing a new raise-slab construction method, a practice which was featured in many architectural magazines at that time.

This method - the Youtz-Slick "lift-slab" method - lifted reinforced concrete slabs onto columns with hydraulic jacks. These slabs weighed 224 tons and were nine inches thick, 122 feet long and 43 feet wide.

Johnstone Hall was the largest building complex erected using this method. Campus legend had it that two other similar structures built elsewhere collapsed before completion. Today, only one of the original Johnstone buildings is still standing on the campus. Most of the rooms had been taken out of use by the mid-1990s as obsolete (electrical wiring wasn't grounded, and is still not grounded in the remaining structure).

Popularly remembered as "The Tin Cans" or in slang shorthand as "the Stone", Johnstone included a loggia that was enclosed by glass walls during the 1970s student union remodeling, but kept its name although it no longer fits the definition.

A popular pastime was known as a "ledge party" and mostly consisted of drinking, listening to music, and sitting on the ledge.

A combination of raised drinking ages and a few unfortunates who rolled off the edge while snoozing and sunbathing led to metal slugs being welded into the window frames of Johnstone rooms. Afterward, the windows would no longer open wide enough for access, putting an end to the era of Johnstone ledge partying.

As originally designed, all three wall panels facing outward above the radiator/heater level were glass with the center panel consisting of two horizontal center-hinged panes that could be opened. An all-glass outer wall proved to yield both privacy and ambient temperature issues. A classic late-1960s Clemson postcard of the dormitory showed the outer panels covered by a mix of cardboard, tin foil, and newspaper. The solid glass panes were eventually replaced by a solid fiber wall panel less temperature and modesty conductive.

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Credit to clemson.edu and wikipedia.com

Monday, March 19, 2012

Tiger Baseball Broadcast Information For Elon

By Scott Rhymer
scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tigerpregame via Twitter
The Tiger Pregame Show via Facebook

Tiger Baseball, and the Road To Omaha, continues today as Clemson hosts Elon at Doug Kingsmore Stadium.

The radio broadcast for today will be provided exclusively by the Flagship Station for Clemson Sports, WCCP 104.9 FM. You can listen via the radio or stream the audio from http://www.wccpfm.com/

If you do not have access to a computer or radio, you can download the Tune In App (it is free) for your Droid, Blackberry, or IPhone/IPad and choose WCCP 104.9 FM. This will allow you to stream the audio from the game on your smart phone.

Roy Philpott will give play by play for today's game with Scott Rhymer offering color analysis. You can reach Roy and Scott during the game at their respective Twitter sites:@royphilpott and @Tigerpregame

Broadcast time for Wednesday's game is 6:00 with first pitch at 6:30.


Clemson and Elon have met 19 times (all at Clemson) on the diamond, with the Tigers holding a 12-7 lead in the series. The Tigers also lead 12-6 in games played at Doug Kingsmore Stadium.


In 1920, Elon defeated the Tigers 6-3. The two teams did not meet again until 80 years later, when Clemson came away with a 17-5 victory in 2000. In 2010, Clemson won both games of a midweek series by scores of 7-2 and 9-2. In 2010, Elon won both games of the midweek series by scores of 15-10 and 4-3 (10 innings). Clemson won both games over Elon in 2009 by scores of 5-3 and 8-7.


Jack Leggett is 12-6 against Elon as Clemson’s head coach and was 1-3 against the Phoenix as Western Carolina’s head coach. Therefore, Leggett has a 13-9 all-time record against Elon.


In game-one, Elon will start sophomore Jim Stokes (1-2, 2.70 ERA) on the mound. The 6’7” righthander from Royersford, PA has made four starts and one relief appearance for a total of 16.2 innings pitched. He has allowed 11 hits (.204 opponents’ batting average) and 14 walks with 12 strikeouts.


The Tigers will counter with junior righthander Jonathan Meyer (0-1, 3.29 ERA) on Tuesday. The San Diego, CA native has made eight relief appearances for a total of 13.2 innings pitched. He has yielded 17 hits (.279 opponents’ batting average) and three walks with 13 strikeouts.
Go Tigers!



Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

March 19th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tillman Hall Circa 1930's

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)
Today’s photo is of the "Agricultural Building" as it was known in the 1930s. Notice the windows open in the building, as it appears to be a warm summer day in Clemson. You may not notice right off hand, but there is something missing from Tillman Hall. While you think about what is missing, here is some info on the history of Tillman Hall.

Tillman Hall is not the oldest building on the campus, but it is one of the most recognized buildings at Clemson. It overlooks Bowman Field and was dedicated in 1891 with much of the building was destroyed in a fire on May 22, 1894.
Known as the Main Building for the first half of the twentieth century, it was formally named Tillman Hall in honor of Governor Benjamin Tillman, one of the seven original trustees of Clemson, by the Board of Trustees at their meeting in the first week of July, 1946.

Today, Tillman Hall houses the Eugene T. Moore School of Education, the school of Technology and Human Resources, and the Calhoun Honors College. Tillman Hall also has a small auditorium that is often used for guest speakers or small presentations. The AFROTC is also located in Tillman Hall.

Tillman's tower holds a clock which chimes every 15-minutes with a 47-bell carillon. The original bell sits in a monument in The Carillon Garden.

Now…have you noticed what is missing from the picture? If you guessed the statue of Thomas Green Clemson you are correct.
The picture above was taken in the 1930’s, and the statue of Thomas Green Clemson had yet to be constructed.

Outliving his wife and his children, Clemson drafted a final will in the mid 1880s. The will called for the establishment of a land-grant institution called "The Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina" upon the property of the Fort Hill estate.

He believed that education, especially scientific education, leads to economic prosperity. He wanted to start an agricultural college because he felt that government officials did not appreciate the importance of agricultural education.

The military college, founded in 1889, opened its doors in 1893 to 446 cadets. Clemson Agricultural College was renamed Clemson University in 1964.

A statue of Thomas Green Clemson and the Fort Hill house are located on the campus. The town of Calhoun that bordered the campus was renamed Clemson in 1943.

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Credit to clemsontigers.com and Wikipedia.

Sunday, March 18, 2012

March 18th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Theatre Turns Into Sports Shop


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from 1954 and is of Clemson’s original movie theatre. The movie being shown in downtown Clemson on this day is The Man With The Golden Arm.

The Man with the Golden Arm was based on the novel of the same name by Nelson Algren, which tells the story of a heroin addict who gets clean while in prison, but struggles to stay that way in the outside world. It stars Frank Sinatra, Eleanor Parker, Kim Novak, Arnold Stang and Darren McGavin.

It was nominated for three Academy Awards: Sinatra for Best Actor in a Leading Role, Joseph C. Wright and Darrell Silvera for Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Black-and-White and Elmer Bernstein for Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture. Sinatra was also nominated for best actor awards by the BAFTAs and The New York Film Critics.

The film was controversial for its time; the Motion Picture Association of America refused to certify the film because it showed drug addiction.

This theatre would make a bigger name for itself in 1984 when a Clemson coach bought it and started selling Clemson apparel from it.

Dr. I.M. Ibrahim, better known by fans and friends as "Coach”, began the business in 1974 after founding the soccer program as a varsity sport in 1967. In his 28 year tenure as head coach, he led his teams to two NCAA National Championships and 11 ACC Championships and he was one of the winningest soccer coaches in America.

Coach Ibrahim received his PhD from Clemson in Chemistry but soon tired of the research environment. After a good deal of convincing, football legend and then Athletic Director Frank Howard had faith in Ibrahim and approved soccer as a varsity sport.

In 1974, Ibrahim had a small savings from his camps, and he invested in a little tiny store in downtown Clemson and began selling Adidas shoes. At that time, his specialty was much in demand, because not too many people had access to good quality athletic shoes.

One thing led to another, and pretty soon, the Tiger Sports Shop had a new and bigger location in the old Martin Drug Store building which was its home until 1984 when the Clemson Theatre was renovated and became the new and current home.


Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com


Credit to Tiger Sports Show web site and Wikipedia.com

Saturday, March 17, 2012

March 17th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tiger Baseball In 1954
(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)
Clemson baseball had an excellent season in 1954, finishing 17-7. This team started out being rated high before the season started and lived up to every expectation. And with good reason, the Tigers had such players as Billy O'Dell, an excellent pitcher who would spend the next 13 years in the pros. Also on that team was Doug Kingsmore, an All-ACC and All-District III outfielder and became the first Clemson player in history to hit 10 home runs in a season.

Because the expectations were so high for this team, the Tigers drew large crowds to the old Tiger field located at the Riggs Athletic Complex. The Tigers would go on to win their first ACC Championship that year and would participate in the NCAA Tournament.

Doug Kingsmore signed as a free agent after Clemson with the Baltimore Orioles. Kingsmore played for the Clemson varsity from 1952-54. An All-ACC and All-District III outfielder in 1954, Kingsmore became the first Clemson player in history to hit 10 home runs in a season. He did that in 1954 while playing in just 24 games. He led the ACC in home runs and runs scored (25) that year and led the Tigers in batting average (.371), slugging percentage (.742) and RBIs (27).


The native of Aiken, SC combined with Billy O'Dell to lead Clemson to the 1954 ACC Championship, the first ACC championship in Clemson athletic history. He was inducted into Clemson's athletic Hall of Fame in 1985.

On January 28, 2000, the Clemson Athletic Department announced that former Clemson baseball star and current Board of Trustees member Doug Kingsmore gave the athletic department a $1 million gift towards the renovation of Clemson University's baseball stadium. It was also announced that the facility would be known as Doug Kingsmore Stadium, Home of the Clemson Baseball Tigers.

Billy O’Dell pitched in the Major Leagues from 1954 and 1956-1967. He was signed by the Baltimore Orioles as an amateur free agent in 1954, and was a Bonus Baby.

O'Dell was All-Star representative for the American League in 1958 and 1959, and in 1959 had the highest strikeout to walk ratio in all of MLB with 2.69. On May 19, 1959, O'Dell hit an inside-the-park home run for the Orioles in a 2–1 victory over the Chicago White Sox. In 1962, O'Dell won a career high 19 games for the NL Champion Giants.


O'Dell was the losing pitcher in Game 1 of the 1962 World Series against the New York Yankees. He gave up a 2 RBI double to Roger Maris, an RBI single to Tony Kubek, a solo home run to Clete Boyer, and finally an RBI single to Dale Long before being relieved by manager Alvin Dark for veteran pitcher Don Larsen, leaving him with 5 earned runs in 7 1/3 innings of work. He did manage to stirke out 8, including Hall of Famer Mickey Mantle, who struck out twice.

O’Dell also got the save in the first ever win by the Atlanta Braves, on April 15th, 1966.

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Friday, March 16, 2012

March 16th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson’s Campus In 1948


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

This aerial photo was taken on or before 1948. Notice the buildings that are in front of Fike Field House. Those were temporary barracks put up during WWII and were quickly taken down soon after this photo was taken. That is how I can date the picture to right around 1948.

In the top right of the picture, you can see Wannamaker and Donaldson Hall. The light poles you see just to the right are the lights of the field where Clemson played football prior to Memorial Stadium’s construction.

Where Klugh Avenue curves next to Wannamaker Hall is where the Sloan Tennis Center indoor building now sits. In the picture from 1948, this is where the first base foul poll is located.

The baseball field in the 1948 photo is where the tennis courts from the Sloan Tennis Center now sit.

Where the temporary barracks sit in the 1948 picture is now Lot 1 at the corner of Heisman Street and Williamson Road.

I believe the house in the 1948 picture across Old Greenville Highway down the 3rd base line of the baseball field is the same house that is occupied today by Mellow Mushroom.

Notice that there is very little on the other side of Old Greenville Highway in the picture from 1948. Today, Outdoor Adventures, Friars Tavern, The Parking Spot, and the Esso Club and condos line that side of the highway.

In the top left hand corner of the 1948 picture, you can see the back part of what is now Lot 2. The tree line that separates Lot 2 and Lot 2A is visible in the 1948 picture.

Two summers ago, a tornado came through Clemson and knocked over most of that tree line. While that might not be good for nature and the aesthetics of the campus, the folks that own condos across Old Greenville Highway like it because they now have a clear view of Death Valley!

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com