National Champions

National Champions

Thursday, May 31, 2012

May 31st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Lake Hartwell and Clemson


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today's photos focus on the construction and history of the Lake Hartwell Dam and how that impacted Clemson.

The above color photo is from the 1930's and shows Clemson campus before the flooding of the rivers in Clemson that would eventually make Lake Hartwell. The Flood Control Act of 17 May 1950 authorized the Hartwell Dam and Reservoir as the second unit in the comprehensive development of the Savannah River Basin.

The original project provided for a gravity-type concrete dam 2,415 feet long with earth embankments at either end, which would be 6,050 feet long on the Georgia side and 3,935 feet long on the South Carolina side. Full power pool was designed to be 660 feet above mean sea level.

Construction of the Hartwell project took place from 1955 and was completed in 1963. And construction of the dam started in 1955 and was finished in 1959.


Lake Hartwell is named for the American Revolutionary War figure Nancy Hart. Nancy Hart lived in the Georgia frontier, and it was her devotion to freedom that has helped make her name commonplace in the Georgia upcountry today. A county, city, lake, state park and highway among others, bear her name.

She married Benjamin Hart and moved to South Carolina where they parented a healthy family of eight children. It is difficult to know the truth about Nancy because there are many myths, hearsay, exaggeration and some imagination in stories that have been told about her. She was about 6 feet tall, could handle an axe or musket and wasn’t afraid to use them, but above all she loved her freedom.


The first challenge in building the Hartwell Dam was in August 1956 when Mrs. Eliza Brock and her daughter refused to allow workmen to come on their property to begin clearing for the reservoir area. This involved 103 acres of land that the government gained ownership of in June of 1956.

Apparently Mrs. Brock never received the offer for her land therefore refusing to allow them on her property. After delaying construction, Mrs. Brock eventually settled on $6,850 for her property.

The next challenge took place in late 1956 when Clemson College objected to the damage that would be done to its property as a result of the impounded water in the reservoir. After countless meetings Clemson finally settled on an agreement where two diversion dams would be built in the vicinity of Clemson College and rechannel the Seneca River.


(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

 
Credit to Clemsonwiki.com

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Broadcast Info And Preview Of Coastal Carolina

By Scott Rhymer scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com
Tigerpregame via Twitter
The Tiger Pregame Show via Facebook


 Tigers Turn Focus Towards Coastal Carolina


Clemson Sports Information

Third-seeded Coastal Carolina (41-17) enters the Columbia Regional after winning the Big South Conference Tournament with a 4-0 record last weekend. 

The Chanticleers, who are 3-0 in neutral-site contests, had an 18-5 conference record during the regular season, as it finished atop the Big South Conference standings.  The 2012 season marks the 12th time in school history and the 11th time in the last 12 years that Coastal Carolina has played in an NCAA Tournament.

Coastal Carolina is led by 17th-year Head Coach Gary Gilmore.  The Chanticleers have won seven games in a row and 17 of their last 21 games.  They are 10-7 in one-run games and 1-7 in extra-inning contests as well.

Coastal Carolina is hitting .285 with a .377 slugging percentage and .386 on-base percentage.  Coastal Carolina, who is fielding at a .965 clip, has also totaled 88 doubles, 11 triples, 23 home runs, 70 hit-by-pitches, 73 sacrifice bunts, and is averaging 5.5 runs per game along with 87 stolen bases in 114 attempts.

Daniel Bowman leads the team with a .401 batting average along with 12 doubles, five triples, six homers, 38 RBIs, and 14 steals.  Rich Witten is batting .350 with 16 doubles, five home runs, and 62 RBIs.  Alex Buccilli has a .320 batting average with three homers and 40 RBIs.  Jacob May has added a team-high 25 stolen bases as well.

The pitching staff has a 2.53 ERA (second-best in the nation) and .235 opponents’ batting average.  The staff has allowed just 24 homers and 189 walks against 381 strikeouts, good for a 2.02-to-1 strikeout-to-walk ratio.

Sophomore righthander Tyler Herb is 8-2 with a 2.87 ERA in 87.2 innings pitched over 16 starts.  Junior lefty Austin Wallace is 5-0 with a 2.05 ERA in 57.0 innings pitched over 14 appearances (10 starts).  Junior righties Ryan Connolly (11) and Aaron Burke (7) have combined for 18 saves.  Connolly is 5-2 with a 2.11 ERA in 72.2 innings pitched over 34 relief appearances, while Burke is 10-5 with a 1.18 ERA in 76.1 innings pitched over 34 relief outings.

Clemson and Coastal Carolina have met 48 times, with the Tigers holding a 40-8 lead in the series that dates to 1986.  On April 24, 2012, Coastal Carolina overcame five errors to defeat Clemson 10-7 at Doug Kingsmore Stadium in their only meeting during the 2012 regular season.

On April 5, 2011, the Tigers defeated Coastal Carolina 5-4 when pinch-hitter Jon McGibbon lined a walkoff single in the 10th inning to score Brad Miller.  The Tigers trailed 4-3 entering the ninth inning before pinch-hitter Dominic Attanasio hit a double in the frame to tie the score.  Then in the Clemson Regional on June 4, 2011, the Tigers totaled 14 hits in their 12-7 win over the Chanticleers.  Richie Shaffer went 3-for-4 with a homer, double, and four RBIs, while Phil Pohl went 3-for-5 with a double and two runs in that game.

The two teams have never faced each other on a neutral field, but the two teams faced off in the 2007 Myrtle Beach (SC) Regional, hosted by the Chanticleers.  Clemson won both meetings by scores of 11-8 and 15-3 to advance to the Starkville (MS) Super Regional.  The two meetings in the 2007 postseason and the one meeting in 2011 comprise the three all-time matchups between the two teams in the NCAA Tournament.

Jack Leggett has a 27-6 mark against Coastal Carolina as Clemson’s head coach.

Tiger Baseball, and the Road To Omaha, continues Friday as Clemson plays Coastal Carolina in the NCAA Regional at 12:00. The radio broadcast for the game will be provided by WCCP 104.9 FM in Clemson.

You can listen via the radio or stream the audio from http://www.wccpfm.com/. If you do not have access to a computer or radio, you can download the Tune In App (it is free) for your Droid, Blackberry, or IPhone/IPad and choose WCCP 104.9 FM. This will allow you to stream the audio from the game on your smart phone.

Roy Philpott will give play by play with Bob Mahoney offering color analysis all throughout the regional.

Broadcast time for Friday is 11:30 with first pitch at 12:00.



Clemson (33-26) is the #2 seed in the Columbia  Regional at Carolina Stadium. 

Clemson is joined by #1-seeded and host South Carolina (40-17), #3-seeded Coastal Carolina (41-17), and #4-seeded Manhattan (33-25).

South Carolina will then face Manhattan on Friday at 4:00 PM.

The two losers will play on Saturday at 12:00 PM, while the two winners will play on Saturday at 4:00 PM.  The winner of the second game on Saturday will play in the championship round on Sunday at 4:00 PM, while the loser of Saturday’s second game will play the winner of Saturday’s first game on Sunday at 12:00 PM.  If the unbeaten team loses on Sunday, the same two teams will play a game on Monday at 7:00 PM to determine the champion.

All games of the Columbia Regional will be televised live by ESPNU and will also be available via webcast at ESPN3.  All of Clemson’s games in the regional will also be broadcast live on the radio by Clemson Tiger Sports Network.  Live stats will be available at ClemsonTigers.com for all Tiger games as well.

The winner of the Columbia Regional will play the winner of the Charlottesville (VA) Regional between June 8-11.  The four teams in that regional are #1-seeded Virginia, #2-seeded Oklahoma, #3-seeded Appalachian State, and #4-seeded Army.

Go Tigers!

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

May 30th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

First Friday Parade In 1977


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the 1977 First Friday Parade. The above picture shows a Clemson Fraternity moving up College Avenue on their way to the Outdoor Theatre for the Pep Rally. Check out the sign on Mr. Knickerbocker’s to the right side of the picture!

When this photo was taken, the First Friday Parade was only in its 3rd year. Started in 1974, the First Friday Parade has been held the Friday afternoon before the first home football game to celebrate the new football season. The parade tradition began in September 1974 in response to a perceived lack of spirit and morale about the Clemson University football team's prospects.

1967 was the last time the Tigers had had a winning season and the first two games for 1974 were played away with Texas A&M crushing Clemson, 24-0, and N.C. State beating the Tigers, 31-10. The brothers of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity began rabble-rousing with Central Spirit to throw a parade to buck up Tiger spirits before the first home game with Georgia Tech, so on Friday, September 27, 1974 was born the "Wreck Tech" Parade.

It wound from the old Winn-Dixie parking lot (now the Blue Heron location), up the hill on College Avenue through downtown Clemson and ended at the Amphitheatre where an enthusiastic pep rally was held. It had the desired effect. The following day the Tigers beat the Yellow Jackets, 21-17, and the team went onto an undefeated home record of 7-4. Coach Red Parker was named ACC Coach of the Year. In 1975,

Clemson opened at home against the Tulane Green Waves and the First Friday Parade was named the "Dam the Wave" Parade. Eventually the habit of naming individual parades was dropped and the event became known universally as the First Friday Parade.


The route of the parade has been twice altered. It originally began at the bottom of the hill on College Avenue at the old Winn-Dixie parking lot and went to the Amphitheatre. After the parade was "removed" from downtown, post-1982, following a particularly debauched example of Clemson "Spirit", it began up the Old Greenville Highway near the east entrance to the campus and proceeded to the Amphitheatre.

In recent years, the origin has been the same, but the pep rally has been located west to historic Riggs Field where the parade concludes for a women's soccer game.

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com


Credit to Clemsonwiki.com

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Broadcast Info And Preview As Tigers Head To Columbia Regional

By Scott Rhymer scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com
Tigerpregame via Twitter
The Tiger Pregame Show via Facebook

 Tigers Enter Enemy Territory With Regional On The Line

(Photo By Rex Brown, IPTAY Media)

Tiger Baseball, and the Road To Omaha, continues Friday as Clemson plays Coastal Carolina in the NCAA Regional at 12:00. The radio broadcast for the game will be provided by WCCP 104.9 FM in Clemson.

You can listen via the radio or stream the audio from http://www.wccpfm.com/. If you do not have access to a computer or radio, you can download the Tune In App (it is free) for your Droid, Blackberry, or IPhone/IPad and choose WCCP 104.9 FM. This will allow you to stream the audio from the game on your smart phone.

Roy Philpott will give play by play with Bob Mahoney offering color analysis all throughout the regional.

Broadcast time for Friday is 11:30 with first pitch at 12:00.

Clemson (33-26) is the #2 seed in the Columbia  Regional at Carolina Stadium. 

Clemson is joined by #1-seeded and host South Carolina (40-17), #3-seeded Coastal Carolina (41-17), and #4-seeded Manhattan (33-25).

The first game of the tourney will pit Clemson against Coastal Carolina on Friday at 12:00 PM.  The Tigers will be the designated home team against the Chanticleers. 

South Carolina will then face Manhattan on Friday at 4:00 PM.

The two losers will play on Saturday at 12:00 PM, while the two winners will play on Saturday at 4:00 PM.  The winner of the second game on Saturday will play in the championship round on Sunday at 4:00 PM, while the loser of Saturday’s second game will play the winner of Saturday’s first game on Sunday at 12:00 PM.  If the unbeaten team loses on Sunday, the same two teams will play a game on Monday at 7:00 PM to determine the champion.

All games of the Columbia Regional will be televised live by ESPNU and will also be available via webcast at ESPN3.  All of Clemson’s games in the regional will also be broadcast live on the radio by Clemson Tiger Sports Network.  Live stats will be available at ClemsonTigers.com for all Tiger games as well.

The winner of the Columbia Regional will play the winner of the Charlottesville (VA) Regional between June 8-11.  The four teams in that regional are #1-seeded Virginia, #2-seeded Oklahoma, #3-seeded Appalachian State, and #4-seeded Army.

Go Tigers!

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Clemson Announces Hall of Fame Class of 2012

By Clemson Sports Information Department
10-Person Class is Largest in History

May 29, 2012 Clemson, SC—Clemson will have its largest Hall of Fame induction class in history this fall when 10 former athletes are inducted.


The class includes former baseball coach Bill Wilhelm, who has also been inducted into the National College Baseball Hall of Fame and the State of South Carolina Hall of Fame within the last two years. The induction ceremonies will take place the weekend of Clemson’s home football game with Georgia Tech, October 5-6..

The class includes eight former All-Americans, four ACC Players of the Year, and four athletes who were successful at the professional level. In addition to Wilhelm, the class includes one of his former player, All-American, Billy McMillon, who hit .391 on Clemson’s 1991 College World Series team.

Two former Clemson football All-Americans are also in the class. The late Gaines Adams, a 2006 unanimous All-American, and Stacy Seegars, an All-America offensive guard from 1990-93 will be inducted. Adams was the number-four selection of the NFL draft in 2006, tied for the highest draft pick in Clemson history. Seegars was a two-time All-American, including 1993 when he was a first-team selection on a top 25 Clemson team.

Wojtek Krakowiak, the only national player of the year in the class, led Clemson to the number-one ranking in college soccer in 1998. He won the Hermann Award as the top player in the nation that year, the second Clemson men’s soccer player to win that honor.

Deliah Arrington, the all-time leading scorer in Clemson women’s soccer history, is one of four women athletes in the class. She led Clemson to its only ACC regular season title in 2002 when she was named ACC Player of the Year and an All-American. Julie Coin, the star of two Clemson Final Four women’s tennis teams, is another former ACC Player of the Year and All-American in the class. The native of France led Clemson to the ACC Championship in 2004.

Karen Ann Jenkins, Clemson’s number-four scorer in women’s basketball history, and Sarah Cooper, a two-time All-American rower, will also be inducted.

Warren Clayton was a two-time Southern Conference Champion in boxing (1940-41). He led the Tigers under coach Bob Jones to the Southern Conference title in 1941. Clayton finished his career with 14 career wins, second highest total for the Clemson team during its era of boxing.

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

May 29th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1965 Band Day In Death Valley


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo was taken on Band Day on September 18th, 1965 and shows the North Stands during the pregame. Clemson was hosting NC State on this day and high school bands from around the upstate converged on Death Valley for the event.

You can see the IPTAY in the endzones, something that was prominent during this era at Death Valley. In the top center of the picture, you can see what is now Lot 2. Notice there are no cars parked there. This is because what is now Lot 2 was the football practice fields in 1965.

On the left of the pictures, you can see the prefabs in the location that is today Littlejohn Coliseum. These prefabs were for Clemson students who were married.

Clemson was the co-ACC Champion in 1965, compiling a 5-5 record. Jimmy Addison was the QB for the Tigers in 1965 and he often handed the ball to Buddy Gore. Here is a picture of the game program from the game, depicting Little Red Riding Hood, aka the Tiger.

As you can see from the picture of Death Valley at the top of the blog, Peace was on the mind of Clemson students in 1965. The nation was in the midst of Lyndon Johnson’s “Great Society”, which included the creation of Medicare. Johnson also increased soldiers on the ground in Vietnam from 75,000 to 125,000.

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Monday, May 28, 2012

Tigers Enter NCAA Regional In Columbia, SC

Clemson to Play Coastal Carolina in NCAA Tournament in Columbia Friday

By Clemson Sports Information Department

Tigers invited to NCAA Tournament for 37th time.
Clemson, SC - Clemson will face Coastal Carolina in the first round of the NCAA Baseball Tournament in Columbia, SC on Friday at 12:00 PM. The Tigers are the #2 seed in the regional, while Coastal Carolina is the #3 seed.  The game will be televised live by ESPNU.

It will be the opening game of the regional that will be held at the home ballpark of South Carolina. The four-team, double-elimination tournament will also have top-seeded South Carolina face #4-seeded Manhattan. The regional will continue through Monday, June 4.

This is Clemson’s 37th appearance in the NCAA tournament, the fifth-most appearances in the history of college baseball. Clemson has been to the NCAA Tournament every year but one since 1987. Clemson’s NCAA history includes 12 trips to the College World Series, six under current Head Coach Jack Leggett and six under his predecessor, the late Bill Wilhelm.

Clemson’s upcoming meeting with Coastal Carolina will be the second meeting between the two teams this year. The Chanticleers defeated Clemson 10-7 at Clemson on April 24. Coastal Carolina committed five errors, including four in one inning, but still won the contest thanks to four runs in the top of the eighth inning.

Clemson has a 40-8 lead in the all-time series with Coastal Carolina. The two teams have played at least once every year since 2007. That year, they met twice in the NCAA Regional at Myrtle Beach and Clemson won both contests, 11-8 and 15-3. The 15-3 victory advanced Clemson to the Super Regional at Mississippi State.

Coastal Carolina enters the NCAA Tournament with a 41-17 record and it is coming off its sixth straight Big South Conference Tournament title. The Chanticleers have won seven games in a row and 17 of their last 21 games entering the NCAA Tournament. Head Coach Gary Gilmore’s team has a strong pitching staff. In fact, it was first in the nation in ERA entering last week’s conference tournaments. The staff has a 2.53 ERA and has allowed just 7.4 hits per nine innings, one of the top-10 figures in the nation.

Aaron Burke, who defeated Clemson in the previous meeting this year, has a 10-5 record with a 1.18 ERA, the second-best ERA in the nation. He has allowed teams to hit just .238 off him in 76.1 innings pitched. Ryan Connolly, the winning pitcher for Coastal Carolina in their clincher in the Big South Conference Tournament last Saturday, has a 5-2 record as a reliever.    Tyler Herb has an 8-2 mark with a team-high 65 strikeouts.

The top hitter for Coastal Carolina is Daniel Bowman, who has a .401 batting average with six home runs and 38 RBIs. He has also stolen 14 bases. Rich Witten has a .350 batting average with five home runs and a team-high 62 RBIs. Alex Buccilli is a third .300 hitter in the lineup with a .320 batting average and 40 RBIs.

Clemson enters the NCAA Tournament with a 33-26 record, including three wins over Florida State when the Seminoles were ranked #1 in the nation. It is the most wins over the #1 team in one season in any sport in school history. Overall, Clemson has 14 wins over top-50 teams in the RPI and the Tigers have beaten seven different teams who are in the NCAA Tournament, including five NCAA teams multiple times.    Clemson’s schedule is rated #6 in the nation as well.

Clemson boasts a 3.94 team ERA. Three Tigers have six wins apiece, freshman Daniel Gossett (6-3), sophomore Kevin Pohle (6-4), and junior Dominic Leone (6-4). Gossett and Pohle each earned their sixth wins against top-ranked Florida State in mid-May. Kevin Brady, who has been limited by a groin injury of late but did pitch in relief in the ACC Tournament, leads the team in ERA among the starters with a 2.52 mark. Scott Firth has appeared in 22 games, all in relief, and has a 4-0 record along with a 1.99 ERA.

First-Team All-ACC third-baseman Richie Shaffer is the top hitter with a .339 batting average. He has started all 59 games and has a team-high 10 home runs, a team-high 58 walks, and 46 RBIs, second-most on the team. He also has a team-high .479 on-base percentage and a team-best .583 slugging percentage. This is the second straight year Shaffer has earned First-Team All-ACC honors, as he was the all-conference first baseball last season. Second-baseman Steve Wilkerson is second on the team with a .308 batting average , while centerfielder Thomas Brittle has a .303 batting average with eight triples, one of the top-10 figures in the nation, and a team-high 11 steals. Phil Pohl, a finalist for the Lowe’s Senior Class Award, is hitting .288 and has eight home runs along with a team-high 50 RBIs.

This will be the first time Clemson has travelled to Columbia for a regional since 1976, when the Tigers won three straight games under Bill Wilhelm to advance to the College World Series. The Tigers defeated South Carolina once and Furman twice at that regional.

Top-seeded South Carolina enters the NCAA Tournament with a 40-17 record and is the #8 overall seed in the NCAA Tournament. Its record includes a 27-7 slate at home. Christian Walker is the top hitter for the Gamecocks with a .328 batting average and 10 home runs. Michael Roth is the top pitcher with a 6-1 record and 2.58 ERA.

Manhattan has a 33-25 record entering the NCAA Tournament, including an 18-0 ledger at home. It won the MAAC championship in thrilling fashion last weekend. After losing the first game against Rider, Manhattan won four straight games, all by one run, including each of the last two against Canisius in extra innings. Manhattan is led at the plate by Anthony Vega, who has a .336 batting average with five home runs and 31 RBIs. Taylor Sewitt has an 11-1 record as the top pitcher with a 2.40 ERA. His win total is among the top five in the nation.

Clemson will receive a very limited ticket allotment that will be used for Clemson player guests. Any tickets that are available for purchase will be sold through the host site. Tickets may be purchased from the South Carolina Athletic Ticket Office by calling 1-800-472-3267 or online at GamecocksOnline.com.

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

May 28th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tiger Baseball In The 1980’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the 1980’s and are of Tiger Baseball.

The above picture was taken at the start of a rain storm at a game in Clemson in the early spring. You can see that there is no Cajun Café or the baseball building that is now located in right centerfield. I believe that old baseball scoreboard you see in centerfield was modified and is used at the track facility today.

The next picture is The Tiger picking up a bat in between innings with the home plate umpire in the distance. You can see the bleachers that were a part of the 3rd base “stands” for many years at Tiger Field.


The final picture is of the Tiger Bat Girl having a conversation with a man on the field. I believe this man is Earl Martin.

Born on Feb. 6, 1928, Martin came to Clemson in 1945 from Greenwood as a freshman and worked as a student manager with the baseball team. In 1948 he began work as an office assistant in the athletic department until he became ticket manager in 1953. He worked in that capacity until 1958 when he began a 30-year career with the United States Postal Service in Clemson. He received a Special Achievement Award from the United States Postal Service in 1974.


During his career as a postal worker in Clemson, he continued to work for the athletic department as a photographer at athletic events. He donated thousands of pictures to the athletic department over the years and many are still used in Clemson's media guides today.

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Credit to Clemsontigers.com

Sunday, May 27, 2012

May 27th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1969 Clemson vs. Georgia Football Game


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today's color photo is from the 1969 Clemson vs. Georgia Football game. The Tigers would fall to the Bulldogs on this day by a score of 30-0. Mike Cavan is at quarterback for the Bulldogs, and I believe he went into coaching after his career was over.

The 1969 team was led by Ray Yauger at running back. He was a good, tough runner for the Tigers during this era and would help lead the Tigers to a victory over Georgia Tech in Atlanta.

The above picture is also unique because it was one of the final color photos taken of Clemson before the University adopted the Tiger Paw as its official logo.

Arguably the most easily-recognizable symbol of Clemson is the Tiger Paw logo, and it is one of the most recognizable symbols in collegiate athletics. Over many years, the Paw has become synonymous with Clemson Tiger athletics and has stood for excellence and pride among students, faculty, alumni, and fans around the globe.

During the 1950s, wholesale changes began to take place around Clemson. The university, among other things, began to admit women and minorities, dissolved the Corps of Cadets, and re-organized the administration - all in an effort to alter the image of the school at the behest of an independent company that was brought in to complete an audit of the entire school.

It was toward the tail end of this rebranding process, in 1969, that rumblings began about changing the logo from the traditional tiger to something more original. A committee was formed to investigate a new logo and to direct the development of such a change. Members included Athletic Director Frank Howard, Assistant Athletic Director Bill McLellan, and Head Football Coach Hootie Ingram, who some suggest was the driving force behind the shift to the Paw.

The committee enlisted the services of the Henderson Advertising Agency in Greenville, SC to come up with the design and complete the transition to a new logo. The owner of the company, James M. Henderson, was a 1944 Clemson graduate who took the job despite the understanding that compensation would be minimal. He and his vice president, Fred Walker, took the lead in making sure the situation was handled with the utmost care and urgency.

After discussing several options, it was decided that the Tiger Paw would be considered for the new logo. The agency turned the project over to creative designer and artist John Antonio in June of 1970 to begin the drafting process, which took several days.


He contacted the Smithsonian Institute for a photo of a tiger's paw and the National History Museum in Chicago, IL for a cast of a tiger paw. He used both items in forming his final version of the Clemson Tiger Paw. When he was finished, Antonio presented the completed project to a group of athletic department personnel, who were largely receptive to the Tiger Paw design.

Apparently, the key to the presentation of the project was Antonio showing the Tiger Paw on a football helmet. Howard thought it looked sharp and he was on board with the overall idea. Then the Paw was successfully pitched to Dr. R.C. Edwards, who was president of Clemson at the time, and it was also presented to the Board of Trustees.

Some of the intricacies of the Paw that contribute to its aura were implemented by design at the behest of Antonio. The 30-degree angle at which the official Paw sits is there to designate a 1:00 kickoff time for football games, which was a normal occurrence in those days. The indention at the bottom is due to a scar that the tiger who had been chosen as the subject for the logo had received before the cast was made.


(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Credit to Clemsontigers.com

Saturday, May 26, 2012

May 26th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1930’s and 1940’s Clemson’s Bowman Field


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the Bowman Field area of Clemson throughout the 1930’s and 40’s.

The photo above was taken during the construction of the Clemson Post Office in 1940. If the building looks familiar, it should. In 1973 the University purchased the Post Office and it is now Mell Hall.

The location of the Mell Hall is between Tillman Hall and Clemson’s Downtown on Bowman Field. Since the Post Office (and later Mell Hall) was not built until 1940, what was in that location prior to the construction of the Post Office?

The below picture helps answer that question. It is a poor quality photo from the 1930’s and it shows a panorama of Tillman Hall down to the College Avenue point (where Dan’s was and what is now TD’s).


The building on the far left with white columns is the old Methodist Church. The small white building on the right side of the picture would later be the famous Amoco gas station. Where the cars are parked is where Mell Hall stands today.

Here is an aerial picture showing much of the Clemson campus and the Bowman Field area. This photo was taken in the 1930’s.


You can notice that the Frat Quad (Donaldson, Wannamaker, Bowen and Bradley Halls) are not in the picture as they have yet to be built. You can also see Riggs Field in the bottom left of the picture. The white flat area beside Riggs Field are tennis courts.

You can also notice the tree sitting in the middle of Bowman Field. I am not sure when this tree was cut down.

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com


Broadcast Info, Recap, and Preview as McGibbon Powers Tigers

By Scott Rhymer scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tigerpregame via Twitter
The Tiger Pregame Show via Facebook

 John McGibbon Powers Tigers Past Seminoles In The ACC Tournament

(Photo By Rex Brown, IPTAY Media)

Tiger Baseball, and the Road To Omaha, continues Saturday as Clemson plays Georgia Tech in the ACC Tournament. The radio broadcast for the game will be provided by WCCP 104.9 FM in Clemson.

You can listen via the radio or stream the audio from http://www.wccpfm.com/. If you do not have access to a computer or radio, you can download the Tune In App (it is free) for your Droid, Blackberry, or IPhone/IPad and choose WCCP 104.9 FM. This will allow you to stream the audio from the game on your smart phone.

Roy Philpott will give play by play with Bob Mahoney offering color analysis.

Broadcast time for Saturday is 10:30 with first pitch at 11:00.

Jon McGibbon lined a three-run walkoff homer over the wall in right-center in the ninth inning to lift Clemson to a 9-7 victory over #1 Florida State in the ACC Tournament in front of 3,282 fans at NewBridge Bank Park on Friday afternoon.

The Tigers, who moved to 1-1 in the ACC Tourney and won their third game in four meetings with the top-ranked Seminoles this season, improved to 33-25. The Seminoles, who fell to 0-2 in the ACC Tournament, dropped to 43-14 in 2012.

Florida State scored four runs in the third inning to take a 4-1 lead. Clemson scored a run in the fourth inning and two more runs in the fifth to narrow Florida State’s lead to 5-4.

Two, two-out singles by Florida State in the top of the eighth inning gave it a 7-4 lead, but Spencer Kieboom’s two-run single in the bottom of the eighth inning cut its lead to one run again. Two one-out singles in the ninth inning set up McGibbon’s walkoff blast, keeping the Tigers alive for the ACC Tournament title.

McGibbon’s walkoff homer was Clemson’s second in ACC Tournament history and first since April 24, 1981, when Jimmy Key hit a walkoff solo homer in the 10th inning to give Clemson a 6-5 victory over Wake Forest in Chapel Hill, NC.

It was also the Tigers’ 23rd all-time walkoff home run and McGibbon’s second career walkoff hit. McGibbon’s walkoff single in the 10th inning against Coastal Carolina on April 5, 2011 gave the Tigers a 5-4 win.

Freshman righthander Patrick Andrews (2-3) retired all four batters he faced with one strikeout to earn the win.

Robert Benincasa (4-1) suffered the loss, as he gave up four hits and three runs with two strikeouts in 1.0 innings pitched. The Seminole closer had been nearly unhittable all season. He had 13 saves while allowing only 16 hits and two earned runs in 32.0 innings pitched prior to Friday’s game. Clemson had been 0-21 when trailing entering the ninth inning in 2012, while Florida State had been 38-0 when leading entering the ninth inning and 36-0 when leading entering the eighth inning.

The win over the top-ranked Seminoles was Clemson’s third over a #1-ranked team in 2012 (all against Florida State) and 15th in school history.

Clemson will take on #8-seeded Georgia Tech on Saturday at 11:00 AM in the ACC Tournament. A Georgia Tech win would send the Yellow Jackets to the ACC title game on Sunday. A Clemson win and a Florida State win over Virginia on Saturday afternoon would send the Tigers to the ACC Championship game. A Tiger win and a Cavalier win over the Seminoles would send Virginia to the ACC title game.

Go Tigers!

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Friday, May 25, 2012

May 25th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1948 Tiger Baseball On Riggs Field


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Since our baseball team may need a little positive mojo, today’s photos will focus on Tiger Baseball from 1948. Today’s photos are from the 1948 season, when baseball games were played on Riggs Field.

Riggs Field hosted a variety of the school's athletic teams, including the football team from 1915 until 1941 and the baseball team from 1916 until 1969. It is named after Walter Riggs, the former coach of the football team and president of Clemson (1910–1924).

The above photo is from a game with Furman in 1948, with the Tigers pulling out the win by a score of 7-6.

Here's another photo that was taken in the same game and facing the opposite direction. Notice that you cannot see Johnstone Hall in the background as Johnstone had not been built yet.


As first laid out in 1915, the football field, surrounded by a cinder track was at the east end of Riggs Field, tennis courts were in the center section, and the baseball diamond was at the west end of the space.

A new baseball field was later laid out on an area of campus separate from the previous sports complex, and expanded tennis facilities replaced the former diamond. Riggs Field now generally only refers to the eastern portion where the football team played until 1941.

Below we see Tiger Baseball Coach Walter Cox getting an ear full from the Citadel coach after the game. Clemson won the game 4-3, and something did not sit well with the Citadel Coach in the loss!


The cinder track at Riggs Field was eliminated during the remodeling as a soccer venue. It is now referred to as "Historic Riggs Field".

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com


Thursday, May 24, 2012

May 24th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1963 Clemson Vs. Georgia


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the 1963 Clemson and Georgia football game as the Tigers come down the hill prior to kickoff. As you can clearly see from the picture, the Hill was not a popular spot to watch a game during this era.

You can also see the freshman “Rats” waving their hats to welcome the Tigers down the hill. The 1963 Clemson/Georgia game would end in a 7-7 tie on October 12, 1963.

Clemson would finish the year 5-4-1 during the season. I believe this was the Clemson/UGA game that started as a nice sunny day (as seen in the picture), but turned into one of the worst rain storms in the history of Clemson football. It cause folks to have to duck for cover under the stands as rain, wind, and lightening came through Clemson.

Just five weeks after this picture was taken, the nation would be shocked to learn that President John F. Kennedy would be assassinated in Dallas, Texas.

The next photo is of several Clemson ladies sunbathing on campus. In 1963, Clemson was co-educational for less than 10 years. Today, there are more women at Clemson than men.


The final picture is from outside of Sikes Hall and some Freshman “rats” thumbing a ride on a beautiful fall day in 1963. This is a tradition that lasted from the 1930’s well into the early 1970’s at Clemson.


(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com


Wednesday, May 23, 2012

May 23rd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

The Loggia and Homecoming From 1964


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos center around the mid 1960’s when color photography was quickly becoming the new fad. The above photo is of Clemson students hanging out in the Loggia at Johnstone Hall.

An open air loggia on the ground-floor (level six) at the hilltop overlooked an assembly quadrangle designed to accommodate cadet formations. The canteen, one floor below the loggia, faced the formation area. The paved quadrangle, lately serving as parking, was redeveloped into a new student union and student government chambers in the mid-1970s.

The campus student locator phone office, the West Campus housing office, student government chambers, a small campus retreat chapel (later converted to a job placement office), and all the student media were located in the three levels above the loggia.

The next photo is from the inside of Sikes Hall when it served as the Library at Clemson. The cornerstone for the future Sikes Hall was laid on January 19, 1904, by Grand Mason J. R. Bellinger, A.F.M., and completed that same year. It is named for Clemson's sixth president, Enoch Walter Sikes.


Sikes was originally the center for agricultural studies and was known as Agricultural Hall, but was remodeled as the campus library after fire destroyed most of the building on the night of April 2, 1925. It served as the campus library until 1966 when the Robert Muldrow Cooper Library replaced it.

Believe it or not, Sikes also housed a museum and gymnasium through past years.

And the final picture today is from Homecoming in 1964. The Tigers were facing North Carolina on November 8th and would lose 29-0 on this day. But, as you can see from the picture, the homecoming festivities were still incredible.

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com


Tuesday, May 22, 2012

May 22 Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Fire At Tillman Hall In 1894

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from May 22, 1894 and show Tillman Hall ablaze. The fire at Tillman broke out in a third floor laboratory, but thanks to the action of the cadets in forming bucket brigades, the exterior walls were saved.

The entire Clemson Library was lost, including books that once belonged to John C. Calhoun and Thomas G. Clemson.

Tillman Hall is not the oldest building on the campus, but it is one of the most recognized building at Clemson. It overlooks Bowman Field. It was dedicated in 1891 and was originally called "The Agricultural Building."

Known as the Main Building for the first half of the twentieth century, it was formally named Tillman Hall in honor of Governor Benjamin Tillman, one of the seven original trustees of Clemson, by the Board of Trustees at their meeting in the first week of July, 1946.

Today, Tillman Hall houses the Eugene T. Moore School of Education, the school of Technology and Human Resources, and the Calhoun Honors College. Tillman Hall also has a small auditorium that is often used for guest speakers or small presentations. AFROTC is also located in Tillman Hall.

Tillman's tower holds a clock which chimes every 15-minutes with a 47-bell carillon. The original bell sits in a monument in The Carillon Garden. In front of the building is a statue of Thomas Green Clemson.

After the fire, reconstruction of what we now call Tillman Hall was quickly planned as the original architects, Brooks and Morgan of Atlanta, were retained at a fee of five percent to plan and supervise the work. Total cost for rebuilding was $22,993.00.

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Can You Keep A Secret? No, And Neither Can They

By Scott Rhymer
Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

I’m fascinated by all of this Big 12 and Clemson talk. Partly because getting as far away from the ACC is actually an intriguing concept to me considering the blatant disregard for football the conference has exhibited.

But I am equally fascinated by the suspense and drama that follow those that believe everyone has cards in this game of high stakes poker. And I am even more intrigued with those that believe the leaders that have the cards in their hand could not keep them hidden.

The Clemson Athletic Department has somewhere around 200 employees. Some of which would never get any inside information on any substantial piece of scoop (such as coach firing/hiring, conference expansion, etc.)

Of the percentage that are high enough up the totem poll to possibly know when major news breaks on campus, almost every single one of them can’t keep a secret. Regardless of their intentions or morals, middle level management chirp as often and as loud as just about any group on the corporate hierarchy.

I don’t mean any disrespect by that…I am simply pointing out human nature and our flaws.

There is someone (wife, close friend, co-worker) that are destined to obtain any juicy information that seeps out in a business structure simply because the DNA of us as human beings is to spill the beans.

Especially if you are high enough up to get good information but not high enough up to understand the ramifications of opening your mouth.

One of the most curious parts of all of these rumors is that some people actually find it hard to believe that members of the Clemson Athletic Department could actually have no idea what is going on. There are probably members of the Athletic Department reading this saying, “there is no way I would be left out of the loop if Clemson were talking to the Big 12”.

And that Athletic Department employee would be dead wrong.

Those with some understanding of the management of people clearly know that it is not only possible to keep almost everyone in the structure of an organization in the dark, but it is an almost certainty during sensitive times with a quickly moving target with values of millions of dollars.

Terry Don Phillips has to answer to President Barker and the Board of Trustees. If they don’t want any single person below TDP to know anything that is going on with these alleged discussions at this stage, then TDP most certainly is not going to pass that information down the line. If he does not tell anyone below him, he does not have to worry about those below him keeping any secrets.

And yes, as much as it may hurt the feelings of those involved, TDP could withhold this information to his most trusted confidant on the staff. It’s a simple as that.

Why? Because middle management can’t keep secrets. There has not been a coaching change or hire at Clemson post-Danny Ford that was not deliberately (or accidentally) leaked by those that work in the Athletic Department. Now that the Internet has sped up and multiplied the access to that type of information, most of us have found out hours or days before some major happening at Clemson before it “officially” happened.

We found out that information in the past because someone along the chain of command could not prevent telling somebody something, who then told somebody else who then posted it on the Internet as a “source”. It is, for better or worse, a reality.

But conference expansion, in the post-SEC expansion era, must take on a different tone. The SEC expansion was a massive political, public relations, and financial disaster because of middle management proving they could not keep their mouths shut.

It is safe to say that smart people learn from other’s mistakes. Those pulling the strings in the Big 12 learned that lesson. Clemson’s BOT and President Barker learned that lesson. And Terry Don Phillips learned that lesson. All of those parties learned that lesson through the failure of others.

So are Clemson and the Big 12 talking? I don’t know. And, to be blunt, I shouldn’t know.

The Clemson Athletic Department has been a tight lipped as I have ever seen it. Those that are normally more than willing to talk on or off the record are saying they have no idea what is going on. It’s not as if the Athletic Department sources are NOT talking, it’s that they don’t know anything TO talk about.

And that is why this is one of the more curious rumors I have seen in a long time. It is rare that so few in the Athletic Department know nothing about something as massive in scale as conference expansion. And I don’t think they are lying about what they know or don’t know. Mainly because they can’t lie. They have proven that over the years.

They can’t keep secrets.

So it is plausible that the ones that are pulling the strings didn’t tell them anything, knowing their subordinates could not keep their mouths shut in order for this all to play out to a sufficient level before the leaks are allowed to appear.

Of course, there is another possibility. If there is nothing to these rumors, then obviously that would explain the ignorance of the situation from those inside the organization.

All of the “leaks” you and I have seen have come from sources in the Big 12…not Clemson. Florida State may have also let the beans out of the bag a week ago when their BOT and Head Coach chimed in on the expansion process. But they were quickly told to zip it and neither have come out of hiding since.

At Clemson, mums the word. At least for now.

In all aspects, it’s a lesson to you and to me. When it comes to something as important as multi-million dollar contracts, middle level management and lower are sometimes out of the loop or used as pawns. So, when you go to them for info, you have to decide whether they really don’t know what the heck is going on…or there IS nothing going on.

But don’t believe, not even for a second, that this is all a big secret. There is no such thing. If every secret is something you tell one other person, the Internet finds a way to take that secret to the masses.

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Monday, May 21, 2012

May 21st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Downtown Clemson In The 1970’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the 1970's and are of downtown Clemson.

The above photo is a picture high above College Avenue facing Bowman Field. Take a look at all the cars lining College Avenue. Can you remember some of the names of this historic rides?

Many places downtown are no longer in Clemson. The below photo we can see Chanello’s Pizza on the left and the J&E Restaurant. Chanello’s is no longer downtown, but it is still in Clemson near the Bi-Lo on Greenville Highway.


The next photo is of a Clemson icon from the 1970’s, The Book Store bar. The Book Store was a great watering hole in Clemson, prompting many students to call home and ask their parents for some extra money so they could go to the “book store”.

Little did the parents know that this money was not going to any books! You could even get into the Book Store from a back entrance near Clint’s Barber Shop. The Book Store closed in March of 1981 when owner Manning Garren died.

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com


Sunday, May 20, 2012

May 20th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Late-1970’s Tiger Field


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s pictures are from the late 1970’s and show Tiger Field and the atmosphere surrounding a game day.

The above photo shows a game from 1977.  As you can see, the first base stands at that time did not extend past the dugouts and bleachers were used for viewing.  You can also see that cars/trucks were able to pull right up to the 1st base line.

The next photo is from a game against North Carolina in 1977 and the view is towards the left and centerfield area.  In 1977 the Tigers finished fifth in the final Collegiate Baseball poll and
participated in the NCAA College World Series.


1977 is also a year that the Tigers started the season with a 26-game winning streak, the longest winning streak in school history.



The last photo is also from the 1977 season and shows the bat girls ready to go into action as they kneel in from of the WSBF Radio Booth.



(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

 Credit to clemsontigers.com

Saturday, May 19, 2012

May 19th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Mid-1970’s Tiger Field


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s pictures are from the early 1970’s and show Tiger Field going through some major renovations. In the above picture, you can see the construction of Jervey Athletic Center is taking place.

Jervey was completed in 1973 and was renovated in 1995. Jervey was named in honor of one of Clemson's most beloved sons, Frank Jervey. The 67,000 square foot building once housed offices for all of the coaching and related staffs for the 19 Clemson sports under one roof, a unique feature that places the center among the most modern of its kind anywhere.

Attached to and complementing the administrative-coaching personnel building at Jervey is a two-level, multi-purpose structure of 29,000 square feet. The upper level of this building is where the Jervey Gym is located. This 1,000 seat arena serves as home for Clemson's Volleyball team.

The lower level of the gymnasium houses the strength training room. Clemson's training facility, located on the lower level of the Jervey Athletic Center, is also among the finest in the nation.

The construction of Jervey backed up right onto Tiger Field and the playing surface in 1973. I would imagine that there might have been hammers banging and saws sawing during some of the games that year.

This next photo is from 1973 and shows additional construction at Tiger Field. What is interesting about this picture is that you can see the top of the South Stands between the construction before the South Upper Deck was built. While the South Upper Deck was certainly a benefit to the football program, it certainly took away from the great look of the stadium with Cemetery Hill and the trees behind the south stands that can be seen before the upper deck was built.


The final picture is from 1974 and, as you can see, the Jervey Athletic Center is now completed and the grassy bank that served as the 3rd base “bleachers” is available for those that want to attend games at Tiger Field. Often, fans would bring blankets and lounge on the grassy area to watch games.


(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

 Credit to clemsontigers.com

Broadcast Info, Recap, and Preview As Tigers Fall To Wake Forest

By Scott Rhymer scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tigerpregame via Twitter
The Tiger Pregame Show via Facebook

 Tiger Baseball Falls For 2nd Day, Look To Salvage Series With A Win Saturday


Tiger Baseball, and the Road To Omaha, continues Thursday as Clemson travels to Wake Forest. The radio broadcast for the game will be provided by WCCP 104.9 FM in Clemson.

You can listen via the radio or stream the audio from http://www.wccpfm.com/. If you do not have access to a computer or radio, you can download the Tune In App (it is free) for your Droid, Blackberry, or IPhone/IPad and choose WCCP 104.9 FM. This will allow you to stream the audio from the game on your smart phone.

Don Munson will give play by play with Bob Mahoney offering color analysis.

Broadcast time for Saturday is 12:30 with first pitch at 1:00.

Brett Armour’s two-run homer in the eighth inning broke a scoreless tie and Wake Forest held on for a 2-1 win over Clemson in front of 1,241 fans at Wake Forest Baseball Park on Friday night. The Demon Deacons, who took a 2-0 series lead and clinched a spot in the ACC Tournament, improved to 31-22 overall and 12-17 in the ACC. The Tigers fell to 32-23 overall and 16-13 in ACC play.

The Demon Deacons escaped a one-out, bases-loaded jam in the top of the eighth inning without allowing a run, then Armour blasted a two-run homer just inside the left-field foul pole in the bottom of the eighth inning to score the game’s first runs. Clemson loaded the bases with no outs in the ninth inning, but only scored one run and fell one run short.

Michael Dimock (3-3) earned the win in relief. He allowed one hit, one run, and two walks with one strikeout in 1.1 innings pitched. Starter Jack Fischer tossed 7.2 strong innings, allowing just four hits, no runs, and two walks with three strikeouts. Fischer retired 18 batters in a row during one stretch.

Daniel Gossett (6-3), the first of three Tiger pitchers, suffered the loss in his first career ACC start. In a career-long 7.1 innings pitched, he surrendered six hits, two runs, and two walks with seven strikeouts.

Clemson and Wake Forest have met 174 times on the diamond, with the Tigers holding a 121-52-1 lead in the series dating back to the 1901 season.  The two teams have faced each other at least one time every year since 1954.

Last season at Doug Kingsmore Stadium, the Tigers won the first (2-0) and last (10-4) games of the series, while Wake Forest won game-two 9-3.  In 2010 at Wake Forest Baseball Park, the Demon Deacons won two of the three games.

The Tigers hold a 46-29 lead in games played at Wake Forest and a 104-40-1 advantage in ACC regular-season games.  Jack Leggett has a 42-20 record against Wake Forest as Clemson’s head coach, including a 17-12 mark in Winston-Salem.  Leggett was 1-1 against the Demon Deacons as Western Carolina’s head coach, meaning he is 43-20 all-time against Wake Forest.

The series will conclude today, which will also conclude the regular season for Tiger Baseball.

Go Tigers!

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Friday, May 18, 2012

May 18th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1970’s Tiger Field


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today we'll take a look at some color photos of Tiger Field's soon after its construction.

Tiger Field was completed in 1970 with heavy input from Coach Bill Wilhelm. It was Wilhelm who had the idea to install the upward-sloping terrace along the outfield fence, which makes Tiger Field unique.

This next photo was taken during the 1972 season, the 3rd season of Tiger Field. Prior to 1970, the Tigers called the Riggs Athletic Complex home for the previous 54 years. Before that Bowman Field was the home for Tiger Baseball, which incidentally was named after R.T.V. Bowman, the Tiger's first baseball coach.


Tiger field opened in 1970 and has a record single-game attendance of 6,480 (set on March 7, 2004, against South Carolina). The Tigers have an .810 winning percentage in games played there all time and are 25-2 in NCAA Tournament games there since the NCAA changed its post-season format in 1999 (with a 39-8 record in NCAA Tournament games all time).

(Note: If you have old pictures dating before 1990 that are Clemson related and you would like to share them, send them to me in an email with as much information about the picture as you can give and I will use it for a future “Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day”).

Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Broadcast Info, Recap, and Preview As Tigers Fall To Wake

By Scott Rhymer scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tigerpregame via Twitter
The Tiger Pregame Show via Facebook

 Tiger Baseball Falls In Game 1 To Wake Forest


Tiger Baseball, and the Road To Omaha, continues Thursday as Clemson travels to Wake Forest. The radio broadcast for the game will be provided by WCCP 104.9 FM in Clemson.

You can listen via the radio or stream the audio from http://www.wccpfm.com/. If you do not have access to a computer or radio, you can download the Tune In App (it is free) for your Droid, Blackberry, or IPhone/IPad and choose WCCP 104.9 FM. This will allow you to stream the audio from the game on your smart phone.

Don Munson will give play by play with Bob Mahoney offering color analysis.

Broadcast time for Friday is 5:30 with first pitch at 6:00.

Broadcast time for Saturday is 12:30 with first pitch at 1:00.

Wake Forest totaled all five of its runs and all six of its hits in the third and fourth innings and held on for a 5-2 victory over Clemson in front of 648 fans at Wake Forest Baseball Park on Thursday night. The Demon Deacons, who took a 1-0 series lead, improved to 30-22 overall and 11-17 in the ACC. The Tigers fell to 32-22 overall and 16-12 in ACC play.

The Demon Deacons hit five singles in the third inning to score three runs, then a two-out double by Pat Blair plated another run in the fourth inning, while Blair also came around to score on the play thanks to a Tiger error. Richie Shaffer laced a two-out, two-run double in the eighth inning, but it was not enough for Clemson, who outhit Wake Forest 7-6.

Tim Cooney (6-6) pitched 7.2 strong innings to earn the win. He gave up seven hits, two runs, and one walk with four strikeouts. Michael Dimock retired all four batters he faced to record his 12th save of the season.

Clemson starter Dominic Leone (6-4) suffered the loss, as he surrendered six hits, five runs (four earned), and three walks with five strikeouts.

Clemson and Wake Forest have met 173 times on the diamond, with the Tigers holding a 121-51-1 lead in the series dating back to the 1901 season.  The two teams have faced each other at least one time every year since 1954.

Last season at Doug Kingsmore Stadium, the Tigers won the first (2-0) and last (10-4) games of the series, while Wake Forest won game-two 9-3.  In 2010 at Wake Forest Baseball Park, the Demon Deacons won two of the three games.

The Tigers hold a 46-28 lead in games played at Wake Forest and a 104-39-1 advantage in ACC regular-season games.  Jack Leggett has a 42-19 record against Wake Forest as Clemson’s head coach, including a 17-11 mark in Winston-Salem.  Leggett was 1-1 against the Demon Deacons as Western Carolina’s head coach, meaning he is 43-20 all-time against Wake Forest.

In game-two, the Demon Deacons will send out sophomore righty Jack Fischer (4-4, 3.21 ERA) on the mound.  The Hinsdale, IL native has made 17 relief appearances and three starts for a total of 47.2 innings pitched.  He has given up 43 hits (.247 opponents’ batting average) and 25 walks with 26 strikeouts.

In game-three, Wake Forest will start junior lefty Brian Holmes (6-2, 2.82 ERA) on the mound.  The Lawrenceville, GA native has made 12 starts for a total of 70.1 innings pitched.  He has yielded 54 hits (.214 opponents’ batting average) and 43 walks with 68 strikeouts.

Due to Clemson’s doubleheader against Florida State on Monday, the Tigers’ starting pitchers for game-two on Friday and game-three on Saturday have yet to be determined.

Go Tigers!

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com