National Champions

National Champions

Sunday, June 30, 2013

62 Days! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day-Mike O’Cain

62 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Mike O'Cain



(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Mike O'Cain lettered for Clemson from 1974-1976.

O'Cain hails from Orangeburg, South Carolina, where he attended Orangeburg-Wilkinson High, the same school that produced Woody Dantzler. O'Cain quarterbacked Orangeburg-Wilkinson to a 13-0 record, a state 4A title, and a #12-national ranking his senior season. His high school coach was Dick Sheridan, who was inducted into the South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame in 2004.

Upon graduation from high school, O'Cain decided to further his academic and athletic career at Clemson. A four-year letterwinner, he was the most valuable player of Clemson's 1976 team, working as both the punter and quarterback. He completed 91-182 passes for 1,291 yards and six touchdowns during his career. He still ranks 16th in Clemson history in passing efficiency.

Also a gifted runner, he held the single-game quarterback rushing record until 1994 with 140 yards against N.C. State in 1976.


O'Cain began his coaching career at Clemson in 1977 as a graduate assistant. He was on the practice field and on the sidelines learning the game from some veteran coaches at the time and realized the thrill of victory, as the Tigers had an 8-3-1 season that culminated with a trip to the Gator Bowl, Clemson's first bowl appearance in 18 years.

O'Cain then coached the offensive backfield at The Citadel for the 1978-80 seasons. In 1981, he moved to Murray State, where he was an assistant under current Virginia Tech head coach Frank Beamer. He remained at Murray State through the 1984 season.

After one year as the assistant head coach at East Carolina, he joined Sheridan as quarterbacks coach at N.C. State. O'Cain served as a top assistant under Sheridan from 1986-92 and was a part of a staff that coached the Wolfpack in six bowl games. In 1993, Sheridan decided to retire just five weeks prior to the start of August practice and O'Cain was promoted to head coach.

This short period of time for preparation did not inhibit O'Cain and the Wolfpack. He took N.C. State to a 7-4 regular-season record and an invitation to the Hall of Fame Bowl. He was the only rookie coach in the nation that year to lead a team to a bowl game.

The next year, O'Cain guided the Wolfpack to a second-place ACC finish with an 8-3 record. One of the victories was over Clemson in Death Valley, as O'Cain became the first Clemson graduate to gain victory against his alma mater in Death Valley. Overall, he had a 2-2 record in Death Valley. He completed his season with a victory over Mississippi State in the Peach Bowl. O'Cain became the second coach in N.C. State history to take a team to a bowl in his first two seasons with the program.

O'Cain and his wife, Nancy, have two daughters, Jenny (19) and Lizzi (17). O'Cain is an active member of the Tiger Brotherhood Organization, FCA, and the Clemson Community.

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June 30th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Downtown Clemson In 1950’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of downtown Clemson in the late 1950’s facing towards campus and Tillman Hall.

We can date the photo to sometime around 1959 because of the movie that is playing in the Clemson Movie House in the photo.

The Hanging Tree is a 1959 movie directed by Delmer Daves. Karl Malden took over directing duties for several days when Daves fell ill. The film stars Gary Cooper, Maria Schell, George C. Scott and Malden and is set in the gold fields of Montana during the gold rush of the 1860s and 1870s.

You can also notice a long gone gas station in the right side of the photo, Sinclair Oil Corporation.

Sinclair Oil Corporation is an American petroleum corporation, founded by Harry F. Sinclair on May 1, 1916, as the Sinclair Oil and Refining Corporation by combining the assets of 11 small petroleum companies. Originally a New York corporation, Sinclair Oil reincorporated in Wyoming in 1976.

The corporation's logo features the silhouette of a large green dinosaur.


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Credit to wikipedia

Saturday, June 29, 2013

63 Days: Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day-Terry Allen

63 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Terry Allen


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Terry Allen who lettered as a running back at Clemson from 1987-1989.

Terry Allen was noted for his toughness, perhaps the most resilient runner in Clemson history. The native of Georgia was Clemson's top rusher in 1987 and 1988, and only a knee injury prohibited him from leading the team in 1989.

Allen was not a highly recruited player out of high school. In fact, the overriding reason he decided to come to Clemson was Danny Ford's willingness to give him a shot at tailback. Every other school wanted him to be a defensive back because they had measured his speed at less than blazing. But, those other coaches failed to measure Allen's heart.

After red-shirting the 1986 season, Allen burst on the scene in 1987, leading the ACC in rushing and setting a Clemson freshman record. A key victory for the Tigers that year took place against Georgia, a 21-20 verdict. His straight ahead, run over the opposition approach, was pivotal on Clemson's winning touchdown drive.


In 1988 as a sophomore, he again led the team in rushing, and the year was climaxed with his selection as the offensive MVP of the Citrus Bowl victory over Oklahoma. Allen's junior year was a constant battle against injury.

He geared up for one last stand against South Carolina, and he responded with 89 yards in the first half, leading Clemson to a convincing lead. But, on his final carry of the first half, he was struck square in the knee, the area that had been giving him trouble. He never carried the ball again for the Tigers.

After that season, Allen decided to turn pro, a decision that was met with criticism due to his injuries. He felt if a team could draft him, they would be responsible for him and realize his work ethic. An injury during a senior year at Clemson would effectively end his career.


The gamble paid off. He was drafted in the 10th round by the Minnesota Vikings. He was injured during 1990, but the Vikings stayed with him. In seven healthy seasons, he has had four 1000-yard seasons and is the only running back in NFL history to come back from torn ACL injuries on both knees.

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Thanks to the ACC.com

July 29th Clemson Historic Pichure Of The Day

Memorial Stadium In 1950’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Memorial Stadium in the late 1950’s facing east.

You can notice that this picture was taken after the original Press Box was built (this one is actually bigger than the original Press Box).

You can also note that the wooden bleachers are still being used. Those wooden bleachers would be replaced by aluminum in 1972.

This picture was taken after the expansion of Memorial Stadium in 1958, which helps me pin the date of the photo to 1959 or 1960.

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Friday, June 28, 2013

64 Days! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day-Cary Cox

64 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Cary Cox

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Cary Cox, who lettered for Clemson at center from 1946 and 1947.

Cary Cox played on Clemson’s JV team prior to the war. He then joined the Navy and later ended up playing at South Carolina and became their team captain. (The Navy would let students play football but the Army didn’t).

After the war Cox returned to Clemson and played football during the 1946 and 1947. He also was the team captain.

Cary Cox was the only player to be team captain at both Clemson and South Carolina.

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June 28th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

John Heisman At Clemson

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

The above photo is of John Heisman’s last team at Clemson. Unfortunately, Heisman is not in the photo.

Most Tiger fans know that John Heisman coached here, but few really knew much about him. I've often heard that the reason Georgia Tech hired him away from us was because he kept beating them on the field.

Well, I think that's part of it, but not the whole story. Heisman was a masterful strategist both on and off the field. Consider the following true story that Joe Sherman tells. Joe Sherman tell this classic Heisman story:

Over two score years ago, fascinated by the reports of this man, I uncovered a story about him that is to me the all-time classic of Clemson football. The story made the Associated Press feature wires and just may have been the first Clemson story to be printed in detail from coast to coast.

The season was 1903 and if you think betting on football is a johnny-come-lately pastime, you're wrong. Heisman was unconcerned with the betting, of course, but he had every intention of winning the upcoming game with Georgia Tech. The betting is a sidelight of the yarn.

Recall, now, that this was the third year of Heisman-coached Clemson powerhouses. When the Clemson team arrived in Atlanta the afternoon before the game, Tech fans were stunned by the scrawny, anything-but-tough physical appearances of the Tiger players. Tech supporters were pop-eyed when the Clemson players checked into their rooming houses and immediately started dispersing to all of the Atlanta nightspots for a real country come-to-town festival.


After a while Tech folks began helping the Tigers enjoy the occasion by buying them mugs of beer, providing them with dancing partners and generally helping them make a big evening of it.

Meanwhile, those Tech supporters, positive that nobody could live it up like that and play football the next day, placed bets on Tech as fast as they could find suckers, local or foreign.

I have never read a detailed account of the game, so I know not who did what or how brilliantly. But the score is a matter of record. It was: Clemson 44, Georgia Tech 5.

The wily Heisman had rounded up a bevy of willing cadets and shipped them into Atlanta to enjoy themselves-"but be sure to enjoy yourself so the Tech team can't help but hear about it."

Meanwhile, he quartered his real Tigers at the railroad stop of Lula, Georgia, a few miles north of Atlanta, and took them into town on game day, as fresh as the dew "where the Blue Ridge yawns its greatness."

Joe's story above has a bit of inconstancy, the 1903 score was 73-0, but be it 1903 or 1902, Heisman clearly impressed the folks in Atlanta. So much so, that they hired him in 1904.

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Thursday, June 27, 2013

65 Days!: Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day-B.C. Inabinet

65 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

B.C. Inabinet


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of B.C. Inabinet, who lettered for Clemson at right tackle from 1953-1955.

Benjamin Claude Inabinet was born in Columbia, S.C. in 1934. Inabinet was an All-State football player at Dreher High School in Columbia, S.C. and led his team to a State AA Championship his senior year.

Inabinet played football at Clemson for Coach Frank Howard from 1953-1955. Standing nearly 6 feet 7 inches tall and weighing over 260 pounds, Inabinet was believed to be the largest football player ever to attend Clemson at that time.

As a senior Inabinet earned an honorable mention All-American recognition and was chosen to play in the North vs. South College All-Star Game held at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Fla. on December 26, 1955.

Inabinet was a fourth round draft choice of the Baltimore Colts but opted to sign with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats of the Canadian Football League. His career was abbreviated by injuries.

Inabinet was an active community leader. He was a member of the Clemson Alumni Association; Chairman of the Richland County IPTAY Club; President of the Greater Columbia Clemson Club, founded in 1958; member of the Greater Columbia Chamber of Commerce; and the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce.

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June 27th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Military College Mess Hall-Part II



(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today I'll continue to combine a chapter of Frank Mellette's book on the Mess Hall along with some old photos. From Frank Mellette's book:

The gravy which was usually made from flour and water tasted terrible and was called "bull juice." I never was able to eat it on anything and instead used catsup on rice or anything else that I ate that might have called for gravy. I must have eaten a barrel of catsup while I was at Clemson.

Various other food items went by nicknames, Coffee was called "Java" which I think is standard about everywhere. Milk was called "cow juice." Eggs were called "hen fruit." I guess that they were all from cold storage because they always had a strong smell and required an extra large amount of catsup.

Syrup was called "zip" or "cylinder oil" and I can't tell you where those names came from. The syrup was good enough that you could usually fill out the meal with it on bread if the other food was not to your liking.

Most dessert was called "sweet stuff." Once a week, ice cream would be served. After the regular meal was over, each cadet at a table got one dip while the waiters received two. I learned from somebody to put syrup on my ice cream which made it go a little further and was actually pretty good.

We always had some sort of dessert for lunch. Often dessert would be pineapple pie, which seemed to be one of the specialties of the baking department. It was very good. Occasionally they would have cream puffs but the slang name for those is too rough, even for this book.

Catsup was called "red stuff." Since the waiters ate ahead of the rest of the cadets, they were able to go back to the kitchen with the empty bowls or pitchers for "seconds," if any were left. With most of the staples, there was usually some more if it was needed.

However, with things like the desserts, meats and milk, one serving was usually all that a table could get. Again, it was not fancy food but the food was nutritious and there was enough to get along on very well.

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Wednesday, June 26, 2013

66 Days: Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day-Chester McGlockton

66 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Chester McGlockton


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Chester McGlockton, who lettered for Clemson at defensive tackle from 1989-1991.

McGlockton was a High School All-American as a Tight End/Defensive Lineman at Whiteville High School in Whiteville, North Carolina. He played Varsity Football all four years. During his senior year he led the Whiteville Wolfpack to a 15-0 record, a State Championship, and a USA Today National Ranking.

As a freshman at Clemson, McGlockton scored a touchdown as a freshman in the 1989 Gator Bowl vs. the West Virginia Mountaineers.

McGlockton was drafted by the Los Angeles Raiders in the 1st round (16th overall) of the 1992 NFL Draft. He played six seasons with the Raiders, earning all four of his Pro Bowl appearances with them. McGlockton also played for the Kansas City Chiefs, the Denver Broncos, and ended his career by playing one season with the New York Jets.

McGlockton finished his NFL career with 51 sacks including a career season high of 9.5 in 1994.


At the start of 2009, he was an intern coach with the University of Tennessee football team. He accepted a defensive assistant position at Stanford in 2010 and worked on David Shaw's staff.

McGlockton died of an enlarged heart on November 30, 2011

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June 26th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Military College Mess Hall



(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today I'll combine a chapter of Frank Mellette's book on the Mess Hall along with some old photos in a two part series (continued tomorrow).

From Frank Mellette's book:

I will have to say this very insistently; being in the Clemson Mess Hall was a unique experience. The captain of the company would march his company in and we would sit down when he gave the command, "Seats."

We were assigned a place at a certain table and we kept it and ate there at every meal until another reassignment was made. This happened two or three times a year to take up the slack for the boys who had left college since the last seating time. There would always be a new seating arrangement as soon as the first semester was over, when quite a few boys decided that they had had enough of Clemson.

The tables held eight boys, three on each side and one at each end. Usually, there would be a senior at the head of each table. There would always be a freshman in the middle seat on each side, to be sure that there was some one there to help pass the food.

After grace had been said by the adjutant, everybody dug in like this was going to be his last meal. The food was plentiful even though it was not of the highest quality sometimes.

You could always expect grits for breakfast and rice for the midday meal. The rice was good and it appeared to be one of the specialties of the kitchen. It was never sticky and we could always separate every grain with our fork.

There were always two pitchers on the tables at breakfast and supper, one for water and one for coffee. The coffee pitcher already had the milk added. However, if the majority of the cadets at a table wanted black coffee, the student waiter would bring it black.

At lunch, there would be pitchers of milk and water, with just enough milk in the pitcher so that each of the eight cadets who sat at the table could get one glass each.

About once a week, we would get chocolate instead of regular milk at lunch.

The language at the tables was something to listen to. We never asked another cadet to "pass" anything. We always said to "shoot" whatever it was that he wanted. An example of this would be for us to say, "shoot the bread."

The food had some rather strange names but as soon as we had been there for a short while, we learned to recognize whatever was called for. Practically all meat went by the name of "bull." One of the few exceptions to this rule was mutton, which went by the name of "goat." That was on the menu occasionally. I had never eaten any previously, and did not know what it was. However, I quickly learned.

Some boy hollered "baaa," when he walked in the mess hall and it was immediately taken up by several others.

Continued tomorrow….

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Tuesday, June 25, 2013

67 Days! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day-Don Willis

67 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Don Willis




(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is Don Willis, who played fullback for Clemson from 1936-1938.

Willis holds distinction at Clemson in that he was the first player in school history to be drafted into the NFL.

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June 25th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Cadets On Bowman Field In 1930's


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today's photo is a wide look at Bowman Field facing Sikes Hall. The photo was taken sometime around 1931 or maybe earlier.

In 1931, the enrollment at Clemson at was only 1,247; which would mean this might be the entire college on parade.

Although Clemson became a coeducational civilian institution in 1955, it still maintains an active military presence. The university is home to detachments for U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) as well as a host school for the U.S. Marine Corps PLC program adjacent to the Semper Fi Society.

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Monday, June 24, 2013

68 Days: Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day-Home Jordan

68 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Homer Jordan


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Homer Jordan, who lettered for Clemson at quarterback from 1980-1982 and led Clemson to a National Championship in 1981.

Jordan was the starting quarterback for the 1981 Championship team that beat the Nebraska Cornhuskers in the 1982 Orange Bowl. He was also an All-ACC selection that year.

Jordan finished his college career completing 250 of 479 passes for 3,643 yards with 15 touchdowns and 27 interceptions.

After playing 4 years in the Canadian Football League, Jordan spent the 1987 with the Cleveland Browns.

Jordan was inducted into the Clemson Athletic Hall of Fame in 1993.

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June 24th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Cadets On Bowman Field In 1950’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo was taken in the early 1950’s…just a few years before Clemson would become a coeducational civilian institution. Here, cadets are lined up on Bowman Field going through an inspection.

Although Clemson became a coeducational civilian institution in 1955, it still maintains an active military presence. The university is home to detachments for U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) as well as a host school for the U.S. Marine Corps PLC program adjacent to the Semper Fi Society.

The following organizations are present among the military personnel at Clemson: Company C-4 Pershing Rifles, K-7 Scabbard and Blade, Major Rudolf Anderson, Jr. Squadron Arnold Air Society, Major Dennis H. Satler Chapter Silver Wings, and the Clemson Rangers. The C-4 Pershing Rifles have won the national society's drill meet eight times: 1999, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009 and 2011.

Company C-4 also performs colorguards, twenty-one-gun salutes, exhibition-drill performances, and POW/MIA ceremonies. Company C-4 performs colorguard performance at the university's home football games.

Clemson’s Air Force ROTC Detachment 770 "Flyin' Tigers" was selected as the #1 "medium-sized" Air Force ROTC detachment in the nation for 2006 (the "High Flight" and "Right of Line" awards), #1 Detachment in the "Southeast" in 2006 ("medium-sized") and 2007 ("large-sized"), and #1 in the state of South Carolina three consecutive years (2005, 2006 and 2007).

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Sunday, June 23, 2013

69 Days! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day-Stacy Driver

69 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Stacy Driver


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Stacey Driver was a tailback at Clemson from 1982-1985.

Driver played as a running back at Griffin High School and was given the title of All-State and All American. At Clemson, Driver was nicknamed the “Ricochet Rabbit” for his quickness and ability to bounce off of tackles.

Driver spent the better part of his career as Clemson’s “other” running back. Terry Allen came to Clemson and took some of Driver’s carries away.

But Driver was a part of a unique game at Clemson. The 1983 team was on probation and could not officially win the ACC Championship. However, as the Tigers finished the ACC Regular Season with a home game versus Maryland, the Tigers would earn the league’s best ACC record if they could beat the Terrapins and Boomer Esiason. This was the game where Central Spirit amassed over 300,000 balloons for the record launch.


Driver guided Clemson to a big game, and as Driver scored a touchdown late in the game to give the Tigers a 42-7 lead, Clemson’s play by play announcer Jim Phillips said on air “Bring on Nebraska”. Nebraska, at the time, was the #1 team in the nation and Clemson was ineligible for a bowl game In 1987.

Driver signed with the Cleveland Browns as a free agent; he played for one season before sustaining a serious knee injury.

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June 23rd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Country Gentleman

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of the Country Gentleman at Clemson. The Country Gentleman is a historical Clemson mascot who was played by a cadet at sporting matches from 1939 into the 1970s.

A top-hatted character in a purple tail coat, with a cane, he represented the Southern hospitality and class of the Clemson student, epitomized by the phrase, "a Clemson man needs no introduction." (Still a popular sticker available at Judge Keller's Store, portraying a Tiger bowing and tipping his tophat).

The concept developed in 1939 from the Greenville News sports writer Carter "Scoop " Latimer's referring to Clemson as the "Country Gentlemen." (It was also Latimer who dubbed baseball player Joseph Jefferson Jackson "Shoeless Joe", in 1908.)

The Country Gentleman was retired after the 1972 season, in the same era in which the playing of "Dixie" and display of the Confederate naval jack at games was discontinued.

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Saturday, June 22, 2013

70 Days: Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day-Joe Blalock

70 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Joe Blalock


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Joe Blalock, who lettered for Clemson at left end from 1939-1941.

Blalock was Clemson's first two-time All-American and was the leading Tiger receiver for three consecutive years. Blalock also averaged 20.34 yards per catch in his career.

Blalock was the 5th round draft choice of the Detroit Lions after the 1941 season.

Blalock is a Charter member of the Clemson Athletic Hall of Fame, being inducted in 1973. In 1999, Blalock was ranked as Clemson's #16 football player of all-time by a panel of Clemson historians.

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June 22nd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Snowstorm Time Exposure 1940’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today's photo is from the late 1940’s, apparently just after a huge snowstorm in the Clemson area.

Somebody braved the elements to venture on this early evening out on Bowman Field to take this time exposure.

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Friday, June 21, 2013

71 Days! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day-Harold Olszewski

71 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Harold Olszewski


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Harry Olszewski, who lettered at offensive guard from 1965-1967

Olszewski was a First-team consensus All-American and the only unanimous choice to All-ACC team in 1967. It was Olszewski ‘s second straight year on the team.

Olszewski was amed to the Silver Anniversary All-ACC team in 1977. He scored a 12-yard touchdown, with a fumbled snap from center, against South Carolina his junior year.

Olszewski started 30 consecutive varsity games and was ranked as Clemson's #17 football player of all-time by a panel of Clemson historians in 1999.

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June 21st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tigers Win In Blacksburg 1977

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the sideline of a rainy and muddy day in Blacksburg, Virginia.

Clemson would drill the Hokies on this day, winning 31-13 under the direction of Charlie Pell.

This is the same Clemson team that would go into Columbia and win on the infamous “Catch” by Jerry Butler from Steve Fuller.

Interesting to see the evolution of Lane Stadium compared to this picture with no endzone seating.

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Thursday, June 20, 2013

72 Days! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

72 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Obed Ariri


 
(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Obed Ariri, who lettered at kicker from 1977-1980.

Obed Ariri was enrolled at Clemson in 1977 when Charlie Pell was in dire need for a kicker. Dr. Ibrahim offered Obed only if he would still continue to play soccer. Pell agreed, and Obed went on to nail every attempt thus securing his place as the kicker for the Tigers. Obed's scholarship was shifted to Football and Pell insisted that Obed forget about soccer.

One of Obed's longest successful career kicks for Clemson came in the clutch fourth quarter against the Virginia Cavaliers in Charlottesville on October 11, 1980 when his 52-yard boot gave the Tigers a 27-24 win. He narrowly missed a 61-yard attempt in a later game that season.

Obed was drafted in the 7th round of the 1981 NFL Draft by the Baltimore Colts but was cut from the team days before the season. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers acquired Obed in 1984 only to release him during the 1985 training camp.


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June 20th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

“Old Green Tom” Part IV of IV


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos continue a collection of the statue of Thomas Green Clemson, which sits in front of Tillman Hall, better known as "Old Green Tom."

The above photo shows how popular “Old Green Tom” can be with the cheerleaders! It’s a great photo-op for both groups!

Sometimes, “Old Green Tom” wants to relive some of his younger days by getting a football in his hand.


“Old Green Tom” always look a little better when a co-ed is draped in his arms.


I hope this 4 part series has brought back some good memories…and good moments…from a great Clemson tradition.

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Wednesday, June 19, 2013

73 Days: Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day-Charlie Waters

73 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Charlie Waters

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Charlie Waters lettered at Clemson from 1967-1968

Waters arrived in Tigertown as a quarterback, but was switched to receiver for the final 15 games of his Clemson career. Later, playing with the Dallas Cowboys, he intercepted 40 passes.

Waters played quarterback at North Augusta High School and made the 1965 Shrine Bowl team.

Waters signed a scholarship at Clemson and by the spring of 1968 as a junior, he was competing with Billy Ammons for the starting QB job. When Ammons hurt his knee in spring practice, Waters won the position. Clemson started the season 0-3-1 and when Ammons’ knee healed, he took over the starting job and Waters shifted to WR for the remaining 15 games of his Clemson career.

A three-year letterman from 1967–69, Waters was an All-ACC selection in 1969 at WR as a senior. During his Clemson career, he caught 68 passes for 1,196 yards and 17.1 yards per catch, to go along with four TD receptions. He still ranks eighth all-time for yards per reception and eighteenth all-time in receiving yards. Waters was inducted into the Clemson Hall of Fame in 1981. He also was inducted into the North Augusta and South Carolina halls of fame.

Waters was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in the third round of the 1970 NFL Draft. Although he nearly was released during training camp, Waters was converted to defensive back and started his rookie year as a backup to Cliff Harris. Waters ended up starting 6 games after Harris had to serve military duty. Waters had 5 interceptions that season, as the Cowboys would go on to lose Super Bowl V. His performance was good enough to make the NFL all-rookie team as a free safety in 1970.

The next year he was moved to cornerback, where he struggled for four years in a backup role. Waters was moved to Strong Safety in 1975 to replace Cowboys great Cornell Green. . He responded with 3 interceptions for 55 yards and a TD. That season, the Cowboys would end up reaching Super Bowl X before losing to Pittsburgh.

Waters made his first All-Pro team in 1976 with 3 interceptions. He returned to the Pro Bowl in 1977 and would make his final Pro Bowl appearance in 1978. Waters injured his knee before the start of the 1979 season and would sit out the entire year. He returned in 1980 and had 5 interceptions. After getting 3 interceptions in 1981, he retired with 50 interceptions, the second-most in franchise history.

After retirement, Waters entered coaching as the defensive coordinator for the Denver Broncos in 1993 and 1994 and then for the University of Oregon. In 2006, the Dallas Cowboys hired Waters as the new color commentator for the Cowboys Radio Network, working alongside Brad Sham. Outside of football, Waters works with longtime teammate Cliff Harris at a gas marketing company. In February 2007, Waters announced that he would be leaving the radio booth after only one season, citing a busy work schedule that did not allow him enough time to prepare for the game broadcasts.

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Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

June 19th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

“Old Green Tom” Part III of IV


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos continue a collection of the statue of Thomas Green Clemson, which sits in front of Tillman Hall, better known as "Old Green Tom."

The above photo is one of Tom with a beer can at the ready.

There has been more than one occasion that “Old Green Tom” has been decorated by students to fit the mood of a holiday!


Prior to a big game, “Old Green Tom” will sometime get a bit of “orange war paint” to be ready for battle!

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Tuesday, June 18, 2013

74 Days: Dark Territory Photo Of The Day-Chad Jasmin

74 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Chad Jasmin



(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Chad Jasmin, running back, who lettered at Clemson from 2000-2003.

Chad Jasmin had a unique career at Clemson, appearing in four bowl games for the Tigers. Jasmine had some of his best moments as a Tiger in bowl games.

He had a career-high 83 rushing yards on 16 carries in the 2001 Humanitarian Bowl, then had two catches for 22 yards and rushed for a score in the 2002 Tangerine Bowl.


In the final games of the 2003 season, Jasmin was once again a key part of Clemson’s offense. Jasmin scored what seemed like 15 touchdowns against South Carolina in a 63-17 win in Columbia.

In the Chic-Fil-A Bowl vs. Tennessee, Jasmin scored on a 15 yard touchdown run giving Clemson a 17–7 lead. Jasmin was also the first Clemson running back since Terrence Flagler (at Wake Forest in 1986) to catch a pair of touchdown passes in the same game at North Carolina in 2002.

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June 18th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

“Old Green Tom” Part II of III


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos continue a collection of the statue of Thomas Green Clemson, which sits in front of Tillman Hall, better known as "Old Green Tom."

The above photo is one of Tom being the center of attention with some high profile people of Clemson.

Sometimes, we do not protect Old Green Tom as well as we should. Or, rather, maybe the lack of respect from human beings sometimes rears its ugly head.

Sometime Old Green Tom is moved around so he can be “touched up” to look a bit nicer.


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Monday, June 17, 2013

75 Days: Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day-David Treadwell

75 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day


David Treadwell

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of David Treadwell, kicker for Clemson from 1985-1987. In the above photo, Treadwell approaches the game winning kick against Georgia in 1986. David Treadwell lettered for Clemson from 1985-1987 as a field goal kicker.

Treadwell holds a special place in the hearts of all Clemson football fans for his last second field goals that beat Georgia in consecutive seasons, 1986 and 1987. Both field goals came in the last 10 seconds of the game to beat the Bulldogs: 31-28 in 1986 and 21-20 in 1987.

Six times in Treadwell's career he made field goals inside the last three minutes of games that won or tied games for the Tigers. Treadwell's kicks were significant reasons Clemson won the ACC Championships of 1986 and 1987. He was also the starting kicker in 1985 and in his first game as a starter, booted a field goal as time ran out to beat Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.

Treadwell came to Clemson as a walk-on. He spent the 1984 season learning from All-American Donald Igwebuike. Today, Igwebuike ranks first and Treadwell second in Clemson history in career field goal percentage. Igwebuike made 74 percent of his field goals, and Treadwell connected on 71 percent.

That senior season was certainly memorable and gratifying for Treadwell because he was named a first-team consensus All-American, the only consensus All-America kicker in Clemson history. He was also a first-team Academic All-ACC selection that year.

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Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com