National Champions

National Champions

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

December 31st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Old Memorial Bridge, Then and Now 


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts) 

Today’s photos are of the old "Memorial Bridge" that was a familiar landmark for years around the Clemson area until lake Hartwell was built. You can see Tillman Hall in the below right of the picture. 

The lake was created in 1963 when the Hartwell Dam was built on the Savannah River Basin seven miles below the point at which the Tugaloo and Seneca Rivers join to form the Savannah. 

The Memorial Bridge, before the flooding of the lake, was the method of transportation over the river. Here you can see the inscription on the bridge. 


This picture and graphic shows the location of the bridge along the old road (Highway 123). 


Back in 2008 when the lake hit record levels of drought, the Memorial Bridge once again saw the light of day. Here is a picture of the remains of the bridge during that drought. 


Scott Rhymer can be reached at Scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Monday, December 30, 2013

December 30th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Downtown Clemson In 1950’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of downtown Clemson in the late 1950’s facing towards campus and Tillman Hall.

We can date the photo to sometime around 1959 because of the movie that is playing in the Clemson Movie House in the photo.

The Hanging Tree is a 1959 movie directed by Delmer Daves. Karl Malden took over directing duties for several days when Daves fell ill. The film stars Gary Cooper, Maria Schell, George C. Scott and Malden and is set in the gold fields of Montana during the gold rush of the 1860s and 1870s.

You can also notice a long gone gas station in the right side of the photo, Sinclair Oil Corporation.

Sinclair Oil Corporation is an American petroleum corporation, founded by Harry F. Sinclair on May 1, 1916, as the Sinclair Oil and Refining Corporation by combining the assets of 11 small petroleum companies. Originally a New York corporation, Sinclair Oil reincorporated in Wyoming in 1976.

The corporation's logo features the silhouette of a large green dinosaur.


The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Credit to wikipedia

Sunday, December 29, 2013

December 29th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Memorial Stadium In 1950’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Memorial Stadium in the late 1950’s facing east.

You can notice that this picture was taken after the original Press Box was built (this one is actually bigger than the original Press Box).

You can also note that the wooden bleachers are still being used. Those wooden bleachers would be replaced by aluminum in 1972.

This picture was taken after the expansion of Memorial Stadium in 1958, which helps me pin the date of the photo to 1959 or 1960.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Saturday, December 28, 2013

December 28th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

John Heisman At Clemson

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

The above photo is of John Heisman’s last team at Clemson. Unfortunately, Heisman is not in the photo.

Most Tiger fans know that John Heisman coached here, but few really knew much about him. I've often heard that the reason Georgia Tech hired him away from us was because he kept beating them on the field.

Well, I think that's part of it, but not the whole story. Heisman was a masterful strategist both on and off the field. Consider the following true story that Joe Sherman tells. Joe Sherman tell this classic Heisman story:

Over two score years ago, fascinated by the reports of this man, I uncovered a story about him that is to me the all-time classic of Clemson football. The story made the Associated Press feature wires and just may have been the first Clemson story to be printed in detail from coast to coast.

The season was 1903 and if you think betting on football is a johnny-come-lately pastime, you're wrong. Heisman was unconcerned with the betting, of course, but he had every intention of winning the upcoming game with Georgia Tech. The betting is a sidelight of the yarn.

Recall, now, that this was the third year of Heisman-coached Clemson powerhouses. When the Clemson team arrived in Atlanta the afternoon before the game, Tech fans were stunned by the scrawny, anything-but-tough physical appearances of the Tiger players. Tech supporters were pop-eyed when the Clemson players checked into their rooming houses and immediately started dispersing to all of the Atlanta nightspots for a real country come-to-town festival.


After a while Tech folks began helping the Tigers enjoy the occasion by buying them mugs of beer, providing them with dancing partners and generally helping them make a big evening of it.

Meanwhile, those Tech supporters, positive that nobody could live it up like that and play football the next day, placed bets on Tech as fast as they could find suckers, local or foreign.

I have never read a detailed account of the game, so I know not who did what or how brilliantly. But the score is a matter of record. It was: Clemson 44, Georgia Tech 5.

The wily Heisman had rounded up a bevy of willing cadets and shipped them into Atlanta to enjoy themselves-"but be sure to enjoy yourself so the Tech team can't help but hear about it."

Meanwhile, he quartered his real Tigers at the railroad stop of Lula, Georgia, a few miles north of Atlanta, and took them into town on game day, as fresh as the dew "where the Blue Ridge yawns its greatness."

Joe's story above has a bit of inconstancy, the 1903 score was 73-0, but be it 1903 or 1902, Heisman clearly impressed the folks in Atlanta. So much so, that they hired him in 1904.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Friday, December 27, 2013

December 27th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Military College Mess Hall-Part II



(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today I'll continue to combine a chapter of Frank Mellette's book on the Mess Hall along with some old photos. From Frank Mellette's book:

The gravy which was usually made from flour and water tasted terrible and was called "bull juice." I never was able to eat it on anything and instead used catsup on rice or anything else that I ate that might have called for gravy. I must have eaten a barrel of catsup while I was at Clemson.

Various other food items went by nicknames, Coffee was called "Java" which I think is standard about everywhere. Milk was called "cow juice." Eggs were called "hen fruit." I guess that they were all from cold storage because they always had a strong smell and required an extra large amount of catsup.

Syrup was called "zip" or "cylinder oil" and I can't tell you where those names came from. The syrup was good enough that you could usually fill out the meal with it on bread if the other food was not to your liking.

Most dessert was called "sweet stuff." Once a week, ice cream would be served. After the regular meal was over, each cadet at a table got one dip while the waiters received two. I learned from somebody to put syrup on my ice cream which made it go a little further and was actually pretty good.

We always had some sort of dessert for lunch. Often dessert would be pineapple pie, which seemed to be one of the specialties of the baking department. It was very good. Occasionally they would have cream puffs but the slang name for those is too rough, even for this book.

Catsup was called "red stuff." Since the waiters ate ahead of the rest of the cadets, they were able to go back to the kitchen with the empty bowls or pitchers for "seconds," if any were left. With most of the staples, there was usually some more if it was needed.

However, with things like the desserts, meats and milk, one serving was usually all that a table could get. Again, it was not fancy food but the food was nutritious and there was enough to get along on very well.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Thursday, December 26, 2013

December 26th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Military College Mess Hall



(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today I'll combine a chapter of Frank Mellette's book on the Mess Hall along with some old photos in a two part series (continued tomorrow).

From Frank Mellette's book:

I will have to say this very insistently; being in the Clemson Mess Hall was a unique experience. The captain of the company would march his company in and we would sit down when he gave the command, "Seats."

We were assigned a place at a certain table and we kept it and ate there at every meal until another reassignment was made. This happened two or three times a year to take up the slack for the boys who had left college since the last seating time. There would always be a new seating arrangement as soon as the first semester was over, when quite a few boys decided that they had had enough of Clemson.

The tables held eight boys, three on each side and one at each end. Usually, there would be a senior at the head of each table. There would always be a freshman in the middle seat on each side, to be sure that there was some one there to help pass the food.

After grace had been said by the adjutant, everybody dug in like this was going to be his last meal. The food was plentiful even though it was not of the highest quality sometimes.

You could always expect grits for breakfast and rice for the midday meal. The rice was good and it appeared to be one of the specialties of the kitchen. It was never sticky and we could always separate every grain with our fork.

There were always two pitchers on the tables at breakfast and supper, one for water and one for coffee. The coffee pitcher already had the milk added. However, if the majority of the cadets at a table wanted black coffee, the student waiter would bring it black.

At lunch, there would be pitchers of milk and water, with just enough milk in the pitcher so that each of the eight cadets who sat at the table could get one glass each.

About once a week, we would get chocolate instead of regular milk at lunch.

The language at the tables was something to listen to. We never asked another cadet to "pass" anything. We always said to "shoot" whatever it was that he wanted. An example of this would be for us to say, "shoot the bread."

The food had some rather strange names but as soon as we had been there for a short while, we learned to recognize whatever was called for. Practically all meat went by the name of "bull." One of the few exceptions to this rule was mutton, which went by the name of "goat." That was on the menu occasionally. I had never eaten any previously, and did not know what it was. However, I quickly learned.

Some boy hollered "baaa," when he walked in the mess hall and it was immediately taken up by several others.

Continued tomorrow….

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

December 25th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Cadets On Bowman Field In 1930's


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today's photo is a wide look at Bowman Field facing Sikes Hall. The photo was taken sometime around 1931 or maybe earlier.

In 1931, the enrollment at Clemson at was only 1,247; which would mean this might be the entire college on parade.

Although Clemson became a coeducational civilian institution in 1955, it still maintains an active military presence. The university is home to detachments for U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) as well as a host school for the U.S. Marine Corps PLC program adjacent to the Semper Fi Society.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

December 24th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Cadets On Bowman Field In 1950’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo was taken in the early 1950’s…just a few years before Clemson would become a coeducational civilian institution. Here, cadets are lined up on Bowman Field going through an inspection.

Although Clemson became a coeducational civilian institution in 1955, it still maintains an active military presence. The university is home to detachments for U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) as well as a host school for the U.S. Marine Corps PLC program adjacent to the Semper Fi Society.

The following organizations are present among the military personnel at Clemson: Company C-4 Pershing Rifles, K-7 Scabbard and Blade, Major Rudolf Anderson, Jr. Squadron Arnold Air Society, Major Dennis H. Satler Chapter Silver Wings, and the Clemson Rangers. The C-4 Pershing Rifles have won the national society's drill meet eight times: 1999, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009 and 2011.

Company C-4 also performs colorguards, twenty-one-gun salutes, exhibition-drill performances, and POW/MIA ceremonies. Company C-4 performs colorguard performance at the university's home football games.

Clemson’s Air Force ROTC Detachment 770 "Flyin' Tigers" was selected as the #1 "medium-sized" Air Force ROTC detachment in the nation for 2006 (the "High Flight" and "Right of Line" awards), #1 Detachment in the "Southeast" in 2006 ("medium-sized") and 2007 ("large-sized"), and #1 in the state of South Carolina three consecutive years (2005, 2006 and 2007).

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Monday, December 23, 2013

December 23rd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Snowstorm Time Exposure 1940’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today's photo is from the late 1940’s, apparently just after a huge snowstorm in the Clemson area.

Somebody braved the elements to venture on this early evening out on Bowman Field to take this time exposure.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Sunday, December 22, 2013

December 22nd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Country Gentleman

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of the Country Gentleman at Clemson. The Country Gentleman is a historical Clemson mascot who was played by a cadet at sporting matches from 1939 into the 1970s.

A top-hatted character in a purple tail coat, with a cane, he represented the Southern hospitality and class of the Clemson student, epitomized by the phrase, "a Clemson man needs no introduction." (Still a popular sticker available at Judge Keller's Store, portraying a Tiger bowing and tipping his tophat).

The concept developed in 1939 from the Greenville News sports writer Carter "Scoop " Latimer's referring to Clemson as the "Country Gentlemen." (It was also Latimer who dubbed baseball player Joseph Jefferson Jackson "Shoeless Joe", in 1908.)

The Country Gentleman was retired after the 1972 season, in the same era in which the playing of "Dixie" and display of the Confederate naval jack at games was discontinued.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Saturday, December 21, 2013

December 21st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tigers Win In Blacksburg 1977

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the sideline of a rainy and muddy day in Blacksburg, Virginia.

Clemson would drill the Hokies on this day, winning 31-13 under the direction of Charlie Pell.

This is the same Clemson team that would go into Columbia and win on the infamous “Catch” by Jerry Butler from Steve Fuller.

Interesting to see the evolution of Lane Stadium compared to this picture with no endzone seating.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Friday, December 20, 2013

December 20th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

“Old Green Tom” Part IV of IV


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos continue a collection of the statue of Thomas Green Clemson, which sits in front of Tillman Hall, better known as "Old Green Tom."

The above photo shows how popular “Old Green Tom” can be with the cheerleaders! It’s a great photo-op for both groups!

Sometimes, “Old Green Tom” wants to relive some of his younger days by getting a football in his hand.


“Old Green Tom” always look a little better when a co-ed is draped in his arms.


I hope this 4 part series has brought back some good memories…and good moments…from a great Clemson tradition.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Thursday, December 19, 2013

December 19th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

“Old Green Tom” Part III of IV


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos continue a collection of the statue of Thomas Green Clemson, which sits in front of Tillman Hall, better known as "Old Green Tom."

The above photo is one of Tom with a beer can at the ready.

There has been more than one occasion that “Old Green Tom” has been decorated by students to fit the mood of a holiday!


Prior to a big game, “Old Green Tom” will sometime get a bit of “orange war paint” to be ready for battle!

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

December 18th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

“Old Green Tom” Part II of III


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos continue a collection of the statue of Thomas Green Clemson, which sits in front of Tillman Hall, better known as "Old Green Tom."

The above photo is one of Tom being the center of attention with some high profile people of Clemson.

Sometimes, we do not protect Old Green Tom as well as we should. Or, rather, maybe the lack of respect from human beings sometimes rears its ugly head.

Sometime Old Green Tom is moved around so he can be “touched up” to look a bit nicer.


The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

December 17th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

“Old Green Tom” Part I of II


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are a collection of the statue of Thomas Green Clemson, which sits in front of Tillman Hall, better known as "Old Green Tom."

The old man started with humble beginnings under the skillful supervision of sculptor Abe Wolfe Davidson in Riggs Hall during the 1930s. The above photo shows Davidson working on the statue.

The next photo shows the Cadets raising their blade in salute of Old Green Tom shortly after he went on display.

The next photo shows the statue overlooking some Freshman Rats beating a drum on a night prior to a big football game.


The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Monday, December 16, 2013

December 16th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

More 1930’s Clemson Campus


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the 1930’s and shows a variety of photos from around campus. The above photo is of the old 3rd Barracks.

The 3rd Barracks was located directly across from the Calhoun Mansion and was an integral part of Clemson’s Military history. The 3rd Barracks was replaced in 1954 by the Johnstone Hall complex.

The next photo is a wide shot of the Main Building.

Known as the Main Building for the first half of the twentieth century, it was formally named Tillman Hall in honor of Governor Benjamin Tillman, one of the seven original trustees of Clemson, by the Board of Trustees at their meeting in the first week of July, 1946.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Sunday, December 15, 2013

December 15th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1930’s Clemson Campus


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the 1930’s and shows a variety of photos from around campus. The photo above is of the Main Building…now called Tillman Hall.

The next photo is of Riggs Hall.


Formed in 1933, the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department is one of the oldest engineering departments at Clemson University. The department was first located in Riggs Hall, built in 1928 to house the Engineering Department and named after Walter Merritt Riggs, president of the university from 1910 to 1924 and a professor of engineering.

Here's a photo of the long gone Dairy Science Building.

Built in 1912 at a cost $20,000, the Dairy Science building was an icon at Clemson for many years.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Saturday, December 14, 2013

December 14th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Great Parking In Quad-1940’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the late 1940’s and is something you don’t see in this day and age at Clemson…great parking in the Quad area!

Greek Housing at Clemson University welcomed the newly renovated Greek Community on the Quad in the Fall of 2005 . For the first time in Clemson's history, the Quad houses not only the Interfraternity Council chapters, as in previous years, but also chapters from the National Pan-Hellenic Council and the Panhellenic Council.

This milestone in Clemson's history marks the beginning of new collaborations and new traditions within the Greek community. The newly renovated Greek Quad includes the addition of two new buildings, a kitchen in every chapter house, interiors appointed with high-quality furnishings, a west-end terrace with two entertainment pavilions, and a basketball court.

The Greek Quad will house 13 chapters of the Interfraternity Council, two chapters of the National Pan-Hellenic Council, and three chapters of the Panhellenic Council. The remaining seven chapters of the Panhellenic Council are housed in their traditional residence halls, Smith Hall, Barnett Hall and Manning Halls.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

clemsonwiki

Friday, December 13, 2013

December 13th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Friday Pep Rally From 1980’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo an overhead view of a Friday Pep Rally before a football game in the 1980’s. This may even be a Pep Rally following the First Friday Parade, but I cannot tell for sure.

One thing that you can notice that is different about the 1980’s compared to now is the number of people that do not wear orange to Clemson events during that era compared to today.

The Solid Orange Campaign, pushed by former Athletic Director Terry Don Phillips and President Barker, has really changed the look of any and all Clemson events.

If this same picture was taken at a Pep Rally this fall, you would see very few people not dressed in orange.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Thursday, December 12, 2013

December 12th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Frank Howard In Color-1940’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is a classic picture of Frank Howard in the 1940’s. I love this picture because, to me, it personifies Coach Howard as the coach.

Under Frank Howard's command, the Tigers remained nationally-recognized contenders throughout the 1950's in college football. In the sterling 1948 season, Clemson won a Southern Conference championship (Howard's first of eight), won our second bowl game, and finished eleventh in the national rankings. For the rest of his life, Howard credited the 1948 team with saving his job.

On November 16, 1974, the grass playing surface in Clemson Memorial Stadium was dedicated as Frank Howard Field.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

December 11th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Homecoming Floats Through The Years (Part II of II)


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are Part II of II taken of Homecoming Floats taken over the course of three decades. It shows how the ingenuity and creativity of these floats evolved through the years.

By the late 1960’s, these displays started to get some size to them as shown in the photo above from the 1967 season. It seemed there was a trend during this era to see who could make the largest and most colorful display.

The last photo shows a clever design with two Tigers pulling on a Maryland terrapin. If you look closely, you can notice that the float spans the road in front of Tillman Hall.


The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

December 10th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Homecoming Floats Through The Years (Part I of II)

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are Part I of II taken of Homecoming Floats taken over the course of three decades. It shows how the ingenuity and creativity of these floats evolved through the years.

The above photo is from the 1958 season. That's a Wake Forest Demon Deacon that the Tiger has cornered on a goal post, if you couldn’t tell!

Below is another from the 1958 season. Using gravestones has always been a popular theme for homecoming floats.

In the 1960’s, the floats began to get a little bit better. The one below is from the 1961 season.


Tomorrow I will post some from the 1960’s through the 1980’s.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Monday, December 9, 2013

December 9th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Wreck Tech In 1974 (Part II of II)


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of the “Wreck Tech” Parade in 1974 and is Part I of II in the series.

Prior to 1974 all the Georgia Tech games were played in Atlanta. That trend ended in 1974 when Tech was scheduled to play the Tigers for the first time in Death Valley.


Such a big event called for a parade, the "Wreck Tech" parade. Here are a number of photos from that famous parade in Clemson when Tech first showed up at our doorstep.


By the way, we won the game 21-17. The first of all home games we won in 1974, including a 28-24 win the following week against UGA.

The Tiger Pregame Show On Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter

Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com

Sunday, December 8, 2013

Is Clemson BCS Bowl Worthy?



Since the loss to South Carolina, some Clemson faithful have wallowed in self-pity, believing that their 10-2 season is not worthy of BCS At Large consideration.
To be fair to those fans, we tend to focus on our small picture and forget that other teams across the nation (outside of FSU) have stumbled and bumbled their way to the finish line of the season as well.  We, as Clemson fans, magnify our shortcomings while not acknowledging that those team we are competing with for At Large BCS bids also have plenty of shortcomings as well.
So the purpose of this Sunday morning blog is to take a look at the worthiness of those teams that Clemson is competing for a BCS bid with.  Should Clemson apologize for being in consideration for a BCS At Large Bid or can this season stand on the merits of what happened and rank evenly or better with the others looking for At Large spots?
First, let’s remove the teams from the mix that earned a BCS Bid on the field and do not need an At Large invitation. 
Florida State and Auburn will play for the National Championship, and both earned that recognition.  FSU earned it by dominating everyone they played and being the only undefeated team in a major conference.  Auburn won it by two miracle plays and a SEC Championship.
That leaves 8 teams that vie for the 4 BCS Non-Title Bowl Games.  Automatic Berths will go to the following teams:  Central Florida by winning American Conference, Michigan State by winning Big 10, Baylor for winning Big 12, and Stanford for winning Pac 12.
That whittles the number of At Large spots to 4.  The BCS Bowls now have to decide who are the 4 “best” teams under their BCS rules for those final positions.  Those BCS rules eliminate the possibility of more than 2 teams from any one conference earning a bid, which eliminates South Carolina and Missouri from consideration because Alabama and Auburn will be SEC reps in the BCS.  So Clemson does not need to match resumes with Mizzou or the Gamecocks due to this BCS rule.
Taking last week’s BCS Standings, here are the “resumes” with the good/bad/ugly for those 4 remaining at large spots, in order as I see it via quality wins and losses.
#1 At Large-Alabama:  Surprisingly, the Crimson Tide have only one win over current BCS Top 25 team (Texas A&M).  That, by itself, dispels the SEC difficulty a bit.  However, the Tide’s single loss on the season was on the on the road at #2 Auburn on a miracle play.  This gives Alabama the “ranking” of #1 At Large Team on this selection Sunday.
#2 At Large-Ohio State:  Everyone outside of Ohio was pulling for the Buckeyes to finally lose, and that is exactly what they did last night.  But Ohio State has a compelling resume that stacks up nicely in the At Large pool, even if it was questionable for title game worthiness.  The Buckeyes have one win over a current BCS Top 25 team (Wisconsin).  And, like Alabama, the Buckeyes only loss was to a very good football team in Michigan State, the Buckeyes losing on a neutral field.  MSU should be in the top 5 when the new rankings come out, so the loss is certainly to a quality team.
The remaining teams that are in the At Large pool have two or more losses.  These teams vie for the final 2 At Large spots in the BCS.
#3 At Large-Clemson:  Clemson gained one win over a team that will finish in the BCS Top 25 (Georgia).  The Tigers two losses were vs. #1 Florida State and at South Carolina.  Florida State has been the most dominant team in college football this year.  And the Gamecocks, much to our dismay, could be a team that finishes in the Top 5 if they win their bowl game.  Clemson’s losses were to very good football teams.  The Tigers had a win over a quality opponent (UGA) and demolished everyone else in between.   
#4 At Large-Oklahoma:  The Sooners, like Clemson, have one win over a team that will finish in the BCS Top 25 (Oklahoma State).  Oklahoma, like Clemson, has two losses.  The reason Clemson jumps Oklahoma in worthiness is that the Sooners lost to Texas, a team that will not finish in the BCS Top 25.  Oklahoma’s other loss was to a quality team (at Baylor).
Those Left Out:
Oklahoma State: The Cowboys finished the season with one win over a team that will finish in BCS Top 25 (Baylor).  The Cowboys lost to a quality team in Oklahoma for one of their losses.  But the other loss was to an unranked West Virginia team on the road that finished 4-8 on the season. 

Oregon:  The Ducks finished the season without a win over a team that will finish in the BCS Top 25.  The Ducks two losses were at Stanford (a quality team) and at Arizona (a team that finished 7-5).
Arizona State:  The Sun Devils did have one win over team that will finish in the BCS Top 25 (Wisconsin).  But Arizona State finished the season with three losses which places them further down on the priority list. 
Conclusion:
Clemson deserves an At Large BCS Bowl Berth for what the Tigers accoplished on the field this year compared to teams that are also vying for the At Large spots.
As frustrating as the losses to FSU and South Carolina were, it does not diminish the accomplishments the team had during the season.  Clemson’s accomplishments and wins on the field rank the Tigers within the worthy realm of BCS when looking at other team's resumes. 
To further Clemson's case of worthiness, the Tiger's losses were to teams that had incredible years, one of which may be poised to win the National Championship.
The teams that Clemson will join in the BCS conversation (even those with only one loss) are teams that had similar and comparable years to Clemson. Those other teams, just like Clemson, saw big wins over overmatched teams, a few wins over quality teams, and a loss or two along the way. 
This season for Clemson was not perfect.  But neither was the season for everyone else outside of FSU. 
Clemson fans should not feel guilty if the Tigers get a BCS Berth tonight.  If Clemson gets in, the Tigers would have earned it comparable to the teams Clemson is competiting with for those positions.  That's all you can do...analyze how you compare to other teams this year in terms of worthiness. 
When Clemson fans "think of what could have been", we need to remember that we are not the only ones doing that kind of thinking as this season draws to an end.
The Tiger Pregame Show on Facebook
Tigerpregame on Twitter
Scott Rhymer can be reached at scottrhymer.tps@gmail.com