National Champions

National Champions

Sunday, July 31, 2016

34 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

34 Days Until Kickoff!
Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day
William Devane

William Devane was a nose guard at Clemson from 1980-1983.

Devane played alongside William Perry, giving the Tigers a formidable front in 1981 that helped lead the Tigers to the Orange Bowl and National Championship.

During the Orange Bowl, Devane recovered a fumble against Nebraska that helped the Tigers go on to the 22-15 win.

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July 31st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Color Photo Of Old 3rd Barracks


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of a building that no longer exists at Clemson…the old 3rd Barracks Building.

The above photo is a rare color picture of the 3rd Barracks and is excellent in quality. I am not sure when this picture was taken, but my guess is that it was sometime around 1950, when the 3rd Barracks was about to be replaced by Johnstone Hall.

The 3rd Barracks was located directly across from the Calhoun Mansion and was an integral part of Clemson’s Military history. The 3rd Barracks was replaced in 1954 by the Johnstone Hall complex.

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Saturday, July 30, 2016

35 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

35 Days Until Kickoff!
Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day
Michael Dean Perry

Michael Dean Perry played defensive line for Clemson from 1984-1987. Perry was a standout on the Clemson defensive line, playing on the 1986 and 1987 ACC Championship teams. Perry led the Tigers to the 1986 Gator Bowl and the 1987 Citrus Bowl.

For his play during those two seasons, Perry was named All-ACC and was a first-team All-American in 1987.

In 1986, he led the Tigers with 15 tackles for loss and nine sacks and had 24 tackles for loss and 10 sacks in 1987. During the 1987 season, he was also a finalist (one of three) for the Outland Trophy and was named ACC Player-of-the-Year, a rare distinction for a defensive player.

After his senior season, he played in both the Hula and Japan Bowls. For his Clemson career, he set the Clemson record for career tackles for loss (61) and is tied for career sacks (28). Both of the records had been previously held by his brother William before he topped each record by one.

Following his Clemson career, Perry was a second-round pick of the Cleveland Browns in the 1988 NFL Draft. Over his 10-year NFL career, Perry was named All-Pro seven times and played in six Pro Bowls.

Perry was named to Clemson's Centennial team in 1996, a member of the ACC 50-year anniversary football squad, and inducted into the Clemson Hall of Fame in 2000.
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July 30th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Bob Bradley As A Senior


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from 1949 and show a very young Bob Bradley during his senior year at Clemson.

The class of 1949 witnessed a perfect 11-0-0 football season in the fall of 1948, and in the above picture you can see Bob Bradley at what I believe to be some celebration get together for his graduation in 1949.

Originally from Greenville, Bob Bradley majored in Textile Manufacturing. He also was the editor of the Tiger newspaper his senior year.

Bradley worked 502 consecutive football games during his career at Clemson. Bradley was presented the Order of the Palmetto by the Governor's office and after his death was inducted into the Gator Bowl Hall of Fame.


Bradley redefined the field of sports information in 1979 when, under his direction, the Clemson Sports Information Department won nine national awards for its brochures and press guides.

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Friday, July 29, 2016

36 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

36 Days Until Kickoff!
Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day
Mike Eppley

Mike Eppley was a quarterback at Clemson (and a point guard for the basketball team) from 1982-1984.

Eppley was an Academic All-ACC honoree in both football and basketball three times each during his celebrated career. Eppley finished 3rd in the nation in passing efficiency in 1983, the highest finish ever by a Clemson quarterback.

Eppley doubled as basketball player for four years and was the recipient of the Frank Howard Award in the 1983-84 academic year and the Clemson IPTAY Athlete-of-the-Year the same season.

As quarterback of the football team, he threw for 28 career touchdowns, now fourth in school history. Eppley was an honorable mention All-American his senior year and was invited to participate in the Blue-Gray game. In 1984, Eppley was a fourth-team Academic All-American and first-team All-ACC in football.

Eppley had a career completion percentage at Clemson of 56.3% and he threw for 3354 yards and 28 touchdowns with 26 interceptions.

For his accomplishments, Eppley was the recipient of the Frank Howard Award and the IPTAY Athlete-of-the-Year Award his senior year. He went on to also earn a master's degree from Clemson. He was inducted into the Clemson Hall of Fame in 1990.

Eppley is now a sales consultant for Yandle-Witherspoon Supply in Charlotte, NC.
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July 29th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Old Mechanical Hall From 1920’s

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from a building at Clemson that no longer exists, Mechanical Hall.

The photo above is a common photo showing the old Mechanical Hall in the snow and you can see that it was located beside Hardin Hall. Mechanical Hall burned down in 1926 and the school went right to work on a replacement building.

Old Mechanical Hall, which housed Engineering since the college's earliest days, burned to the ground on May 27th, 1926. The roof over the machine shop caught fire, which spread to the rest of the structure. Fire fighters from Anderson, Greenville and Easley finally contained the blaze, saving nearby structures. Greenville City Firefighter J.C.F (Jimmy) Burns lost his life while fighting this blaze.

The fuzzy photo below shows an interesting view of Riggs Hall in 1928 from the Main Building (Tillman). It shows a view of the area where Mechanical Hall was and that it still was without any grass two years after the fire.


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Thursday, July 28, 2016

37 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day


37 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Rodney Williams


Rodney Williams lettered at Clemson from 1985 through 1988. 
Williams took over the starting job from Randy Anderson in 1985, and never looked back, becoming a 4 year starter for Clemson during the program’s most successful era.
In his final home game on November 19, 1988, Williams led the Tigers to a 29-10 win at Memorial Stadium, while also avenging a 20-7 loss to the Gamecocks the year before in Columbia.

The Columbia native was taunted by the Gamecock fans in that loss. But in 1988, Williams threw for 192 yards and rushed for 38 more, including the game-clinching touchdown for the 15th-ranked Tigers. It was Williams’ 31st-career victory. He later went on to get win No. 32 with a victory over Oklahoma in the Citrus Bowl. The 32 wins are a Clemson record for a quarterback.
Rodney is the most successful quarterback in  Clemson football history.
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July 28th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

What A Difference 9 Years Make

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos span 1952 to 1961, which included a dramatic change at Clemson.

The above photo was taken around 1952, when Clemson was still an all-male Military College. You can take note of the Trustee House in the background and the partial view of the second barracks on the right.

Fast forward just 9 years and you see the same photo location, but dramatically different culture at Clemson. In 1961, Clemson was no longer a Military College and it was no longer all-male.


One note from the two pictures…notice that the chimneys on the Trustee House are gone in the 1961 photo. I wonder where they went??!!

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Wednesday, July 27, 2016

38 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

38 Days Until Kickoff! 

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day 

Deshaun Watson 



Deshaun Watson lettered at Clemson from 2014-2016 and put up record numbers at the quarterback position for the Tigers, guiding Clemson to consecutive College Football Playoff appearances and the 2016 National Championship. 



Watson led Clemson to 28 wins over his final two seasons while wearing the #4 jersey, the same number worn by former Tiger quarterback Steve Fuller. The number had been retired at Clemson, but Fuller allowed it to come out of retirement for Watson. 

Watson was a two-time Heisman Trophy finalist; finished third in the 2015 balloting with 148 first-place votes and second in 2016 with 269 first-place votes. Watson was the first ACC player to finish in the top three of the voting on multiple occasions. 


Watson was a two-time recipient of the Davey O’Brien Award, one of only four quarterbacks who can make that claim, and the first since Oklahoma’s Jason White in 2003 and 2004. 

Watson tied Rodney Williams and Tajh Boyd with 32 wins as a starter in the National Championship win over Alabama and Watson finished 3rd in ACC history in total offense with 12,094 yards, behind only NC State’s Philip Rivers and Boyd. 


Watson finished first in Clemson history in career completion percentage (.674), passing efficiency (157.5) and total offense per game (318.3). 

Watson also was a two-time All-ACC Academic Team (2015,16) selection and is believed to be the first quarterback in FBS history to pass at least 37 hours college credits and throw 35 or more touchdown passes in the same academic year (2015-16). 

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July 27th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1938 Aerial View Of Clemson


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from sometime around 1938 and shows a very young Clemson College Campus.

In the top right corner of the picture you can see the newly constructed Fike Field House. The building originally opened in 1930 as the Clemson Field House, and was the indoor home to Clemson athletics.

You can see the farm land to the left and behind Fike that will one day be Memorial Stadium. Death Valley was not built until 1941.

And finally, if you look beside Long Hall, the small building that you see is the old Dairy building.

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Tuesday, July 26, 2016

39 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day


39 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Chuck McSwain

Today’s photo is of Chuck McSwain, who lettered for Clemson at running back from 1979-1982.
McSwain rushed for a career-high 151 yards and scored two touchdowns in Clemson’s 29-13 victory over South Carolina to cap an 11-0 regular season in 1981. Six weeks later, Clemson beat Nebraska in the Orange Bowl to win the National Championship.

McSwain said in an interview,  "My brother Rod came to Clemson a year later, and we were very fortunate to both make a difference in that South Carolina game. He blocked a punt that turned the momentum and I ended up being the leading rusher. I broke out a couple of long runs and scored a couple of touchdowns. "

You can read the original article here from Orangeandwhite.com:

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July 26th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Hottie Ingram Out At Clemson


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from Press Conference following the 1972 season at Clemson.

Clemson, after just completing a 4-7 season, put pressure on Hootie Ingram to resign as head coach of the football team. Ingram indeed resigned, paving the way for Red Parker. In his three years as head coach, Ingram’s overall record was 12-21.

In today's photo we see Hootie Ingram (left), Clemson President R.C. Edwards (center) and Hootie's replacement, Red Parker (right) in a press conference announcing the coaching change.

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Monday, July 25, 2016

40 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

40 Days Until Kickoff!
Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day
Mr. Zip and Mr. Zap

Today’s photos are of Buddy Gore and Jacky Jackson, who lettered for Clemson at running back from 1965-1968. The above photo of Buddy Gore, who was nicknamed Mr. Zip.

Before the 1967 season began the media had dubbed Gore Mr. Zip because he had great speed as he “zipped past'em”.

The below photo is of Jacky Jackson, dubbed Mr. Zap, because he go the tough yards inside the tackles and “zapped ‘em”.

Jacky Jackson also had great hands out of the backfield as he caught a long scoring pass the year before to complete the scoring in the famous comeback win over Virginia in the first game for Howard's Rock. Buddy

Gore, while not nearly so skilled at receiving, managed to hold onto a key TD pass in 1967 when the Tigers knocked off the highly ranked NC State Wolfpack led by Chuck Amato.

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July 25th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Downtown Clemson In 1920’s


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are rare images of downtown Clemson in the 1920’s. The above photo is from what is now downtown Clemson facing toward Tillman Hall. In the photo you can see Sloan’s Store (which is now Subway).

The next photo was taken the same day but from the other side of College Avenue. The house in the upper right corner is sitting where Mr. Knickerbocker's is located today.


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Sunday, July 24, 2016

41 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

41 Days Until Kickoff!
Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day
Steve Fuller

Today’s photo is of Steve Fuller, who lettered for Clemson at quarterback from 1975-1978.
Fuller was a dangerous pass-run threat as a quarterback, and was one of the centerpieces of the Clemson teams of the late 1970′s that brought the Tigers back to national prominence in college football.

One of only five two-time ACC Football Players of the Year (1977, 1978), he led Clemson to a 27-8-1 record in his final three seasons with the Tigers including an 11-1 mark, an ACC Championship and a No. 6 national ranking in 1978.
  

Fuller was one of only three players in Clemson history to be named both an Academic All-America (twice, 1977-78) and a football All- America (1978, 3rd-team) in the same year, Fuller was chosen to the prestigious NCAA Top Five Award in 1978 for excellence in athletics and academics.


Fuller is a charter member of Clemson’s “Ring of Honor,” and was a first-round draft pick of the Kansas City Chiefs and the 23rd overall selection in the 1979 NFL Draft. He went on to an eight-year NFL career with Kansas City, Chicago and the L.A. Rams, throwing for 7,156 yards, 28 TDs and a 56.8 completion percentage in 86 NFL games.

While in Chicago, he was a member of the 1985 NFL Champion Chicago Bears. In 2003, he was named to the ACC’s 50th Anniversary Football Team. Originally a native of Enid, Oklahoma, Fuller currently lives in Bluffton, S.C.
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July 24th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

“Gator” Farr

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo are of a Clemson legend, “Gator” Farr. Gator was a 1930 graduate of Clemson and best known for his humorous eulogies during the pep rallies prior to the South Carolina football games.

Frank Mellette wrote an interesting insight into the character of "Gator" Farr:

“There is no doubt in the mind of anyone at Clemson that "Gator" Farr was one of the greatest characters who ever went there. "Gator" could blow a bugle and get the softer and more beautiful tones out of it than anybody at Clemson. He was a member of the Drum and Bugle Corps during his first two years. He realized that if he remained there for his last two years, he could only reach the rank of captain.”

“He had higher military ambitions and withdrew from the Drum and Bugle Corps after his sophomore year. During his junior year, he was Regimental Sergeant Major, the highest ranking military member of the junior class. "Gator" was Cadet Colonel his senior year, again the highest ranking military member of his class.”

“From time to time, after he had dropped out of the Drum and Bugle Corps, he would go down to the guardroom and blow taps. When he did this, there wasn't a cadet on the campus who didn't know who was blowing the bugle that night. On those occasions as the last notes faded away, there would be immediate and instantaneous applause from all sections of the campus.”

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Saturday, July 23, 2016

Tiger Pregame Show To Have New Co-Host In 2016!

New WCCP Host Scott Cole To Join Tiger Pregame Show


The Tiger Pregame Show, a Clemson game-day fixture for 14 years, will broadcast its 171st consecutive broadcast this Fall with a new lineup that is designed to give Clemson fans the best pregame show atmosphere anywhere on the college football dial.

Scott Rhymer, host of The Tiger Pregame Show since its inception, will be joined by new WCCP radio host Scott Cole for all three hours of the show each week.


See link below for information on Scott Cole and his new role with the Roy Philpott show on WCCP.


More detailed information, including broadcast location and promotional information on the show, will be coming to you soon.

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July 23rd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Dan’s Sandwich Shop (Part III of III)

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are the 3rd part of a three part series on Dan’s Sandwich Shop.

Dan’s Sandwich Shop may best be known for the pictures that adorned the walls of the restaurant. Clemson athletes, especially football players, made it to the “big time” if Dan would place their photo on the wall in the restaurant. You can see in the above photo all of the pictures that are on the walls.

After this Clemson landmark closed, it became the Tiger Paw Restaurant and served boxed chicken lunches for awhile but soon the kitchen closed and it was strictly a bar with a dance floor. Too many minors nabbed by ABC agents inside saw the loss of the Tiger Paw's license around 1976.


This cleared the way for The Bookstore, which featured a live deejay for the disco era in downtown Clemson. Students could honestly tell their parents that they were spending time at the bookstore! When The Bookstore closed, the place was remodeled into Strawberry's Restaurant, which stayed in business for several years in the early to mid 1980's.

In 1986 and part of 1987 it was a bar/restaurant called Lester's Burgers & Spirits. Finally, the location became TD's, opening July 1, 1988.

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Friday, July 22, 2016

43 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

43 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Eric Harmon


Today’s photo is of Eric Harmon, who lettered for Clemson at right guard from 1987-1990.

Harmon was a 6-foot-1, 282-pound lineman who started over 40 games which (at the time) was more than any other offensive lineman in school history.

During his senior season, Harmon led the Tigers with 38 knockdowns and had 235 for his career, 11 shy of the school career record.

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42 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

42 Days Until Kickoff!
Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day
Walter Cox




President Emeritus Walter T. Cox is a member of Clemson University's Class of 1939, and was the third alumnus to rise to the status of president (1985-1986). "Dean" Cox served Clemson in almost every role imaginable, from an offensive guard for the football team while a student, to the football team's line coach, from the baseball coach and ticket manager, to an assistant to the president and director of alumni affairs, from dean of students, to vice president for student affairs. Dean Cox devoted his life to Clemson, and even after his retirement was often seen around campus saying hello to fellow Tigers.

In his playing days, Cox was a starter on the football team, including the 1940 Cotton Bowl Championship team that won Clemson's first-ever bowl game. He was also named All-State that year and later returned to the team as a coach. He was inducted into the Clemson Hall of Fame in 1984.

A Belton native, the son of Walter T. and Grace Campbell Cox came to Clemson in 1935 as a freshman cadet. Except for a year of military service during World War II, he never left. As a student, he was a company commander in the Cadet Corps, a letterman in the Block "C" Club and an All-State guard on the football team. After graduating in 1939, he stayed on for a year of postgraduate study, during which he anchored the Tiger front line that helped defeat Boston College in the Tigers' first post-season game, the Jan. 1, 1940, Cotton Bowl.

During the '40s, he worked for Clemson athletics in a number of capacities (assistant football coach, business manager, baseball coach, recruiter, IPTAY promoter). He even filled in for the boxing coach, who was called into the military, and helped clear land, with handsaws, chains and mules, for the football stadium.

In 1950, Cox became the director of public relations and alumni affairs and assistant to the president. In 1955, he was named vice president for student affairs and took a leadership role in directing Clemson's transition from military to civilian status.

"Dean Cox," as he was known to generations of Clemson students, served as vice president for student affairs for three decades. During his tenure, enrollment grew from 2,700 to more than 12,500, and he presided over some of the most important milestones in Clemson's development into a major university, including the enrollment of women and the peaceful desegregation of the student body. At the request of the Board of Trustees, he left the student affairs post in July 1985 to become Clemson's 10th president. The third Clemson graduate to be the school's president, he served until Max Lennon assumed the presidency in March 1986.

Cox once again was called upon to fill a key position temporarily when, from July 1986 until March 1987, he served as vice president for institutional advancement. Although he retired from full-time employment in April 1987, he remained active as a consultant and goodwill ambassador for the university.

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July 22nd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Dan’s Sandwich Shop (Part II of III)


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are the 2nd part of a three part series on Dan’s Sandwich Shop. Today’s photos were taken in the 1960’s after Dan's expanded by acquiring the space next door.

Dan Gentry was the original owner of the Trolley Car Diner on Pendleton Road that is now Mac's Drive-In. After many years working with Mac, Gentry decided to open his own restaurant, thus starting his own Clemson tradition.


Dan’s Sandwich Shop is known as much for the pictures that adorned the walls as for the burgers that they served. Clemson athletes, especially football players, made it to the “big time” if Dan would place their photo on the wall in the restaurant. Tomorrow, I will post some photos that show those famous pictures inside of Dan's Sandwich Shop.

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Thursday, July 21, 2016

44 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

44 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day
Banks McFadden


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Banks McFadden, who lettered for Clemson at tailback from 1937-1939.

McFadden attended Great Falls High School in South Carolina, where he led the Red Devils to two state championships in football and one in basketball. McFadden is widely considered to be the greatest athlete in Clemson University history, lettering in three sports (football, basketball and track).

In 1939, McFadden was voted the Associated Press' "Athlete of the Year". McFadden was also a two-time All-American in basketball (1938 and 1939) and led the Tigers basketball team to a Southern Conference championship in 1939.


Upon graduating, McFadden played football for the National Football League's Brooklyn Dodgers. McFadden fought in World War II and upon returning to the United States went into coaching.

McFadden was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1959. On September 19, 1987, Clemson University retired his basketball No. 23 and football No. 66. In October 2008, the O'Rourke–McFadden Trophy was introduced as a reward to the winner of the annual football game between Boston College and Clemson, in honor of the historic meeting between Charlie O'Rourke and Banks McFadden in the 1940 Cotton Bowl Classic, Clemson's first bowl appearance.

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July 21st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Dan’s Sandwich Shop In 1950’s

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Dan’s Sandwich Shop (Current Location of TD’s) in the 1950’s. This corner has a long history at Clemson with a variety of restaurants occupying the space.

Early in the 1940’s a restaurant named College Cafe occupied the space. In 1952, Dan Gentry opened Dan's Restaurant directly across from the town's post office and served hamburgers. "Judge" Keller would walk up from his store for lunch there.

After a fire in 1965, Dan set-up cooking burgers on the sidewalk outside the next day. Gentry would later purchase the building beside his original Dan’s and expand into the biggest hamburger joint in Clemson during the 1960’s and 1970’s. Tomorrow, I will have some pictures of the expanded Dan’s.

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Wednesday, July 20, 2016

45 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

45 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Justin Watts


Justin Watts played wide receiver at Clemson from 1996-2000.

Watts came to Clemson as a heralded quarterback prospect from South Florence. In his first week of practice, he moved to wide receiver.

In the 10th game of his freshman year, Watts tore his knee up and a year later tore up his other knee against Florida State.

That prompted the very unusual circumstance of lettering 5 years in a sport. Watts became the first Clemson football player since 1919 to earn five letters.

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July 20th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Memorial Stadium From The Air In 1955

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from high above Memorial Stadium at halftime of a game in 1955. As you can see from the picture, Clemson Cadets are coming back into the stands after being on the field at halftime.

The 1955 Tigers were 7-3 overall and 3-1 in the ACC, which was good enough for a 3rd place finish in the ACC. The Tiger QB’s in 1955 were Charlie Bussey and Don King. Joel Wells and Billy O’Dell were the running backs on that team.

This was the last year that Clemson was a military institution. This group of Cadets on the field in this picture were the last group to have this honor at Clemson.

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Tuesday, July 19, 2016

46 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

46 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Don Testerman


Today’s photo is of Don Testerman, who lettered for Clemson at running back from 1974-1975.

Testerman’s biggest day as a Tiger was in 1974 when the Tigers travelled to Knoxville to take on Tennessee. After the Tennessee kick-off, Clemson struck from long yardage with Testerman running 68 yards over right-tackle for a touchdown giving the Tigers a 28-21 lead with 7:16 left.

Testerman would finish the day with 146 yards and 1 td in the loss to Tennessee.

Testerman played in 4 NFL seasons from 1976-1980 for the Seattle Seahawks and the Miami Dolphins. Here is a link to some info about Testerman’s time with the Seattle Seahawks. http://www.beckys-place.com/testerman

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July 19th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1950’s Memorial Stadium Press Box

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today's photos are of the early 1950's and the Press Box at Memorial Stadium. As you can see from the picture above, the area was small and cramped.

Lou Sahadi writes of some of the antics that went on during this era in the press box.

"Frank Howard always enjoyed a good rapport with the press. Basically, he always made time to accommodate the writers and radio announcers who covered the team.”

“One of his favorite writers in the early 1940's was Carter "Scoop" Latimer, who worked for the Atlanta American. If there was one thing that Latimer liked besides writing, it was drinking. Sometimes he mixed the two, which didn't always work out too well. “

“Yet, Scoop had enough friends to bail him out of trouble. Once, when he was covering a Clemson game, he got so drunk he couldn't finish writing his story and passed out in the press box. His cronies bailed him out. Several kept filing stories over the Western Union wire. After they had sent six of them, the newspaper sent back a message to stop, it didn't need any more Clemson stories."

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Monday, July 18, 2016

47 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

47 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Wyndie "Dumb-Dumb" Wyndham

Wyndie Wyndham played blocking back on offense and linebacker on defense from 1948-1950.

Here is an excerpt from Frank Howard’s Book, Howard: The Clemson Legend

When Wyndham first came to Clemson everybody called him 'Friendly'. I didn't know at first why they called him that- because he was the most unfriendly boy on the team - but I later found out that Friendly was actually his given middlename.

You hear a lot nowadays about how quarterbacks 'audible' at the line of scrimmage to change the play that was called in the huddle. We did that 50 years ago. We did it by adding and subtracting . One day at practice we were running a play. I think I had called for them to run 54. But I saw that the tackle was in too close and the play wouldn't go so I hollered, "Add two!"

Well, 'Friendly' Wyndham was bumfuddled altogether. He stopped and he came back and said, "Whatta you mean, coach?" I said, "Well, I'll tell you. The play I called was 54. Add two used to make that 56. I don't know what it is now, but I think it's still 56. And I want you to run 56."

Then I looked at him and said, "Boy, you're so dumb you ought not to be one, you ought to be twins." After that, all his teammates didn't call him 'Friendly' anymore. Or just 'Dumb'. Because of my remark about twins they started callinghim 'Dumb-Dumb'.

But he was a great one. In 1950 we was playing Missouri out there. We got ahead of one of Coach (Don) Faurot'steams. It was in September -- the second game of the season - and it was hot as the devil. We were playing some two platoon football then, although Dumb-Dumb played in both the offensive backfield as a blocking back and at linebacker on defense.

I started substituting freely because of the heat and the fact that we were comfortably ahead. I wanted everybody to geta chance to play. Dumb-Dumb came up to me and said, "Coach, how about not putting more than six of them sorry ones in on defense with me at one time. I can protect six of them, but I don't think I can protect more than six."

Missouri had scored in its last 125 games. It was something like 13 or 14 seasons since they'd been shut out. They hadn't scored on us up to that point and Dumb-Dumb said he'd like to be a part of stopping their string. So I told Dumb-Dumb that I'd stand on the 50-yard line and that I'd have all the players I wanted to get in the game on defense stay to my left. I'd have all the offensive players stand to my right. Then I told him he could be in charge of the defensive substituting as long as he saw that everybody got in the game.

We were getting ready to kick off to them after scoring a touchdown. It was a high, but short kick. They had a big 'oltackle. He was about 6-6 and weighed about 290 back in the days when boys wasn't so big. That big tackle backed up under the ball and had his hands up in the air to catch it.

The second the ball touched his hands, Dumb-Dumb hit him right in the stomach and knocked him cold. They recovered the ball and went on offense. The right halfback ran with it. Dumb-Dumb tackled him and knocked him out. The fullback ran with it on the next play and Dumb-Dumb knocked him out. Then the left halfback ran with it and he knocked him out.

That's when the Missouri captain went up to the referee and asked him to "get that wild so-and-so out of this game before he kills every one of us." Dumb-Dumb made sure all the subs - the boys he called 'the sorry ones' - got in the game, but we still managed to shut them out, 34-0.

We blanked four teams that year - Presbyterian, 55-0; Missouri, 34-0; North Carolina, 27-0; and Auburn, at Auburn,41-0 in the last regular season game. Then we beat Miami in the Orange Bowl. We didn't lose a game that season. Our only blemish was a 14-14 tie with South Carolina in one of those 'Big Thursday' games.

We ended the season 10-0-1and ranked 10th in the Associated Press poll. Going back to that 1949 Gator Bowl game, one play Dumb-Dumb made in it I'll always remember. The Missouri quarterback was named Harold Entsminger - and he was a good 'un. He pitched to one of his halfbacks –Nick Carras or Dick Braznell - I don't remember which one. Then Entsminger was leading the interference.

Dumb-Dumb was backing up the line. Well, he ran over the quarterback to get at the ball carrier and he knocked both of them out.

Dumb-Dumb was a killer.

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