National Champions

National Champions

Sunday, January 31, 2016

January 31st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Aerial Photo Of Campus From 1960’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s aerial photos were taken in the early 1960’s and show the Clemson campus.

In the photo above, you can notice that just two of the shoebox dorms were completed. You can also note that Martin Hall was under construction.

Here's another photo from the same day, with a slightly different view of campus.


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Saturday, January 30, 2016

January 30th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Winter Fun In Clemson From 1940’s (Part II of II)


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the 1940’s and shows Clemson Cadets having a great time during winter weather on campus. The above photo shows Cadets in a snow ball fight on campus.

The snow always creates a gathering of people to have fun and enjoy each other’s company.


With classes cancelled, most Cadets simply found things to do outside in the snow and ice.


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Friday, January 29, 2016

January 29th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Winter Fun In Clemson From 1940’s (Part I of II)

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the 1940’s and shows Clemson Cadets having a great time during winter weather on campus. The above photo shows hundreds of Cadets having a blast on Bowman Field.

The next photo shows Cadets using whatever they can get their hands on to make a homemade sleds.


The final photo of today is of a classic car covered in snow.

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Thursday, January 28, 2016

January 28th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Class Of 1908 At 25th Reunion


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of the Class of 1908.

In 1933, the Class of 1908 was having their 25th reunion and took this photo. I wonder if these folks had any idea that 80 years later their photo would be splashed around to thousands of people on the thing called “Internet”!

It also makes you wonder how people will view our pictures taken today on the technology they have 80 years from now.

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Wednesday, January 27, 2016

January 27th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Snow On Bowman Field


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today we will look back at a few photos of Bowman Field and Tillman Hall in the snow.

The above photo is from the 1980’s and shows a freshly glazed layer of snow that hit the upstate of South Carolina and Clemson.


It seems that anytime Clemson gets snow, one of the first places that students and alumni go to take a picture is at Bowman Field looking towards Tillman. There is just something about snow and Tillman Hall that is majestic in the winter.

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Tuesday, January 26, 2016

January 26th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Golf Team


(Photos and Story Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today we'll take a brief look at the history of the Clemson golf team and those involved in its creation. The first golf team at Clemson was started in 1930 by a number of cadets who approached the then AD, James G. Gee, about forming a golf team. Gee approved and the cadets got their wish.

The above from 1930 shows the golf team on Bowman field. Also, in the photo above, the first coach of the golf team, Reverend George Hodges (far right). At the time, Hodges was the minister of the Methodist Church in Clemson.

Over the years Hodges was minister at a number of churches throughout the state. In fact, a congregational fellowship hall was named for Hodges in Clinton, SC. Hodges, however, only coached the golf team for one year before being reassigned to another Methodist church.

Fast forward 52 years later and we see the first Clemson golf team to win an ACC championship, in 1982. Under coach Bobby Robinson, (who later became the Athletic Director), the Clemson golf team finally turned the corner and became a consistent national contender.

And it all started from a handful of cadets and a Methodist minister. Interestingly, one of those cadets lived to see the success of the Clemson golf team. In the 1930 photo, next to coach Hodges, is Alan McCrary Johnstone, the grandson of Alan Johnstone, one of Clemson’s original elected trustees.

In 2003, when the Clemson golf team won the NCAA National Championship, the team named Alan McCrary Johnstone as honorary captain. Not only was Alan Johnstone the last surviving member of Clemson’s very first golf team, he was also the only surviving charter member of IPTAY.


Sadly, Alan McCrary Johnstone is no longer with us. At the age of 95, he died in January, 2006, in his hometown of Orangeburg, S.C. And while Johnstone Hall was named after his grandfather, the legacy of Alan McCrary Johnstone lives on in the Clemson golf team.

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Monday, January 25, 2016

January 25th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tree Rollins


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of Tree Rollins during his time at Clemson in the late 1970’s.

Tree Rollins real name is Wayne Monte Rollins, but everyone called him Tree. At a height of seven foot one, it's easy to see why. Tree was also the first Clemson athlete to have their jersey retired.


Wayne Monte "Tree" Rollins (born June 16, 1955, in Winter Haven, Florida) played 18 seasons in the National Basketball Association for the Atlanta Hawks, Cleveland Cavaliers, Detroit Pistons, Houston Rockets and Orlando Magic. He was primarily known under his playing name, Tree.

The 7-foot-1-inch 275 pound Clemson graduate played center, and gained high esteem for his defense, particularly his rebounding and shot-blocking ability. He finished in the top three in blocked shots six times, leading the league during the 1982-83 NBA season.


At the time of his retirement in 1995, he was fourth all-time in career blocked shots, behind only Hakeem Olajuwon, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Mark Eaton. He currently holds the seventh highest total of career blocked shots, with 2,542.

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Sunday, January 24, 2016

January 24th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Danny Ford Alabama Player Card

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is something you don’t see very often…an Alabama playing card of Danny Ford.

After graduating from Gadsden High School in Gadsden, Alabama in 1966, Ford was an All-SEC selection under Paul "Bear" Bryant at the University of Alabama, where he played in three bowl games.

Ford received a bachelor's degree in industrial arts in 1970 and a master's degree in special education in 1971 from Alabama. Ford coached as an assistant at Alabama and Virginia Tech before joining Charley Pell's staff at Clemson.

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Saturday, January 23, 2016

January 23rd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Campus Life In 1950’s Part II




(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are Part II from an idyllic time in our Nation’s history…and in Clemson’s history.

The 1950’s saw an increase in enrollment at Clemson, including the inclusion of women to the college. Those early women were seen on campus blending in with the male students in the photo above.

These students were a part of a generation that were babies when World War II started, and many lost their fathers in the war.


But this new energy of post war America in the 1950’s was a vibrant time.

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Friday, January 22, 2016

January 22nd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Campus Life In 1950’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from an idyllic time in our Nation’s history…and in Clemson’s history. The above photo shows students moving to and from Tillman Hall.

The 1950’s saw an increase in enrollment at Clemson, including the inclusion of women to the college.

These students were a part of a generation that were babies when World War II started, and many lost their fathers in the war. But this new energy of post war America in the 1950’s was a vibrant time.

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Thursday, January 21, 2016

January 21st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Memorial Stadium In 1950’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

This picture also gives a great view of the old press box at Memorial Stadium. As you can tell, there is not much room for anyone up there, and certainly not enough for the massive amount of media that cover the games today.

When the stadium was expanded in 1958 above the portals in both lower decks, 18,000 seats were added to Memorial Stadium’s capacity. The “new” press box that was built in the South Stands in 1958 after the expansion was not much larger than the one in this picture.

I like this view of Memorial Stadium because you can see the trees around Cemetery Hill, which are now blocked out by the South Upper Deck. People that see Death Valley only on TV get no appreciation of the beautiful surroundings right outside the stadium.

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Wednesday, January 20, 2016

January 20th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1940’s Clemson Campus


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from post-WWII Clemson in the late 1940’s.

World War II took a tremendous toll on Clemson’s enrollment. Prior to 1943, Clemson’s enrollment was hovering around 2,700 students. Just two years later in 1945, that number would drop to 745.


Enrollment quickly rebounded, however, as GI’s returned to the States in post-WWII using the GI Bill that gave financial aide to veterans so they could attend college. By 1948, enrollment was up to 3,746 students…many of them war veterans.


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Tuesday, January 19, 2016

January 19th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Dan’s Sandwich Shop On Gameday


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)


Today photo is another of Dan’s Sandwich Shop, a Clemson historic landmark.

This photo is from 1968 and it appears like it was taken some Saturday prior to a game in Death Valley. One can assume that because of the long line at 10:50 am.

You can also, notice the 1968 football schedule on the "Tiger Menu."

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Monday, January 18, 2016

January 18th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Tiger Baseball In The 1960’s
Part II of II 


(Photos  Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

From April of 1965 until May of 1966, Rusty Adkins had a 41-game hitting streak. Adkins hit .438 during the streak that still stands as the longest in ACC history. 

During the 1966 season, George Sutton set the record for the fastest to 10 home runs by hitting 10 home runs in 18 games. His 10th homer came against Wake Forest on April 23, 1966. 


During the 1967 season, the Tigers won the ACC title and were ranked #7 in the final Collegiate Baseball poll. Clemson participated in the NCAA District III Playoffs at Gastonia, NC. After losing the first contest against Florida State, Clemson rebounded with three straight victories. But Auburn ended Clemson’s season by defeating the Tigers 6-5 in the championship game in 13 innings. 

And in 1968, left-hander John Curtis became Clemson’s first first-round Major League draft selection. Curtis was the #10 overall pick in the secondary phase by the Boston Red Sox. 


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Sunday, January 17, 2016

January 17th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Tiger Baseball In The 1960’s
Part II of II 


(Photos  Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

From April of 1965 until May of 1966, Rusty Adkins had a 41-game hitting streak. Adkins hit .438 during the streak that still stands as the longest in ACC history. 

During the 1966 season, George Sutton set the record for the fastest to 10 home runs by hitting 10 home runs in 18 games. His 10th homer came against Wake Forest on April 23, 1966. 


During the 1967 season, the Tigers won the ACC title and were ranked #7 in the final Collegiate Baseball poll. Clemson participated in the NCAA District III Playoffs at Gastonia, NC. After losing the first contest against Florida State, Clemson rebounded with three straight victories. But Auburn ended Clemson’s season by defeating the Tigers 6-5 in the championship game in 13 innings. 

And in 1968, left-hander John Curtis became Clemson’s first first-round Major League draft selection. Curtis was the #10 overall pick in the secondary phase by the Boston Red Sox. 


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Saturday, January 16, 2016

January 16th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Tiger Baseball In The 1960’s 
(Part I of II)


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts) 

Today’s photos are from the 1960’s and are a montage of Clemson Tiger baseball, which was played on Riggs Field. In the fall of 1957, from the advice of North Carolina Head Coach Walter Rabb, Frank Howard hired a 27-year old assistant from China Grove, NC named Bill Wilhelm. 

After the 1959 regular season, Clemson, Wake Forest, and North Carolina were tied for first place, forcing a playoff among the three. Clemson beat Wake Forest 4-2 at Thomasville, NC on May 16 and downed North Carolina 9-7 in Gastonia, NC to claim the ACC crown. 


In June of 1959, Clemson raced through the NCAA District III Playoffs at Gastonia, NC, downing Georgia Tech 9-6 and Florida State twice (24-2, 5-0) to advance to Omaha. At the College World Series, the Tigers lost to Arizona 3-2 on June 13 in 12 innings in their first game in Omaha. They bounced back and defeated Colorado State 7-1 the next day, but were eliminated by Penn State 7-0 on June 15. 

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Friday, January 15, 2016

January 15th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Cadets In World War II And Fletcher Anderson 


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts) 

Today’s photos are of Clemson Cadets during World War II. The text below was written by former Clemson kicker Fletcher Anderson (’04) from Clemson World Online. 

Clemson has also produced many war heroes through the years. Jimmie Dyess ’31 was awarded the Carnegie Medal and the Medal of Honor. Dyess is one of three Clemson alumni to receive the Medal of Honor. Gary Evans Foster, a Clemson student in 1919-1920, and Daniel Augustus Joseph Sullivan, Class of 1902, were also awarded our nation’s highest medal for bravery. Rudolf “Rudy” Anderson ’48 was the only casualty in the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. 

The University has monuments to its soldiers. Military Heritage Plaza commemorates a Clemson cadet’s passage from student to military leader and displays 64 medals representing those earned by Clemson military. The monument in front of Mell Hall symbolizes the transition the Class of 1944 experienced during WWII. And just recently, the Clemson Corps launched a new initiative for the Scroll of Honor Memorial at the football stadium. 

Perhaps the quietest memorial is found in the Woodland Cemetery. American flags adorn more than 50 headstones on “Cemetery Hill.” In addition to serving their country, these people served Clemson. 


For example, you probably know that James “Banks” McFadden was a two-sport All-American at Clemson in 1939, but you may not know that he served overseas, 1946-1949, in the U.S. Army Air Corps. He returned to Clemson for a long, productive career with the Clemson Athletic Department. 

Robert C. “Bob” Bradley ’51 entered Clemson as a freshman in 1941. He also served four years in the U.S. Army Air Corps during WWII and returned to Clemson after the war to finish his degree. “Mr. B” went on to touch many lives as Clemson’s sports information director. 

Walter T. Cox Jr. ’39 also impacted the lives of many students during his time at Clemson. He called Clemson home for more than 70 years, and the only time he left was to serve his country during WWII. 

Richard C. Robbins joined the armed forces in 1942 and served first under U.S. Gen. George Patton and later in Okinawa, Japan. Robbins completed two tours of duty in Korea before returning to Clemson to become a student-athlete adviser. Col. Robbins’ reputation suggests that he utilized some of Patton’s techniques to motivate, discipline and carry out his duties at Clemson. 

Others like George C. Means served in the U.S. Coast Guard during the D-Day Normandy Invasion of WWII. Some of the headstone markings indicate the medals they received during their service: “Marvin A. Owings Sr., Col. Army, Bronze Star, Purple Heart & OLC”; “William Joseph Lanham, Captain U.S. Army WWII, Purple Heart and Silver Star.” 

The University’s imprint on the U.S. Armed Forces, and thus our country, is undeniable and unforgettable for so many. Perhaps next time you’re on campus you might visit some of these monuments — including Woodland Cemetery — and say a quiet “thank you” to Clemson’s silent soldiers. 

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Thursday, January 14, 2016

January 14th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Photo Quiz Part III of III

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Alan Cutts, the man responsible for digitizing all of these photos for me, came up with a quiz for some of the photos. Today is Part III of III that will quiz you on your knowledge of Clemson through some photos.

Answers will be available at the bottom of the blog each day.

1. Who is the woman in the photo below?


2. The YMCA building was built in 1916, thanks to a $50,000 donation from whom?


3. Hoke Sloan grew up in Clemson and served as the school's tennis coach for many years. However, he never attended Clemson as a student. What educational institution did he attend?


4. Who is the man in the photo below? (Hint: He has a building named after him on the east campus.)


Answers: 
1. Frank Howard's daughter, Alice Howard.
2. John D. Rockefeller gave a $50,000 donation for the building of the YMCA at Clemson.
3. Hoke Sloan attended Auburn.
4. August Schilletter, Steward of Clemson College; in charge of kitchens & mess hall, 1900-1918

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Wednesday, January 13, 2016

January 13th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Photo Quiz Part II of III



(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Alan Cutts, the man responsible for digitizing all of these photos for me, came up with a quiz for some of the photos. Today is Part II of III that will quiz you on your knowledge of Clemson through some photos.

Answers will be available at the bottom of the blog each day.

1. The photo below is of the first president of Clemson. What was his name?


2. John C. Calhoun called his home "Fort Hill" because it overlooked a fortification built around 1776. What was the name of the fortification?


3. As Thomas Green Clemson continued advocating a separate agricultural college, apart from the University of South Carolina, in June 1886 the Columbia institution gave him something, in hopes of diverting him from his goal. What did they give him?

Answers:
1. Clemson's first president was Henry A. Strode.

2. Fort Hill overlooked a fortification called Fort Rutledge, built around 1776.

3. An honorary Doctor of Laws degree, given to Thomas G. Clemson by the University of South Carolina.

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Tuesday, January 12, 2016

January 12th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Photo Quiz Part II of III



(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Alan Cutts, the man responsible for digitizing all of these photos for me, came up with a quiz for some of the photos. Today is Part II of III that will quiz you on your knowledge of Clemson through some photos.

Answers will be available at the bottom of the blog each day.

1. The photo below is of the first president of Clemson. What was his name?


2. John C. Calhoun called his home "Fort Hill" because it overlooked a fortification built around 1776. What was the name of the fortification?


3. As Thomas Green Clemson continued advocating a separate agricultural college, apart from the University of South Carolina, in June 1886 the Columbia institution gave him something, in hopes of diverting him from his goal. What did they give him?

Answers:
1. Clemson's first president was Henry A. Strode.

2. Fort Hill overlooked a fortification called Fort Rutledge, built around 1776.

3. An honorary Doctor of Laws degree, given to Thomas G. Clemson by the University of South Carolina.

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Monday, January 11, 2016

January 11th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1930’s Bowman Field


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the 1930’s and shows Bowman Field in one of the first photos ever taken of this historic Clemson area.

Named for Randolph T. V. Bowman, an instructor in forge and foundry, and an assistant football coach who died at 23 on April 14, 1899, it was originally the parade ground for Clemson cadets.

Bowman Field has served as the home of Clemson University's first football, baseball, basketball, track and even soccer teams.

As an assistant coach, Bowman had been responsible for much of the clearing of the area, formerly a sedge field. Bowman holds the Clemson distinction of having coached the very first intercollegiate match played at Clemson, a baseball game with Furman on April 24, 1896, which, unfortunately, the Tigers lost, 13-20.

The two 19th-century cannons located on the field were nicknamed Tom and Jerry by the class of 1952.

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Sunday, January 10, 2016

January 10th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Homecoming Floats Through The Years (Part I of II)

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are Part I of II taken of Homecoming Floats taken over the course of three decades. It shows how the ingenuity and creativity of these floats evolved through the years.

The above photo is from the 1958 season. That's a Wake Forest Demon Deacon that the Tiger has cornered on a goal post, if you couldn’t tell!

Below is another from the 1958 season. Using gravestones has always been a popular theme for homecoming floats.

In the 1960’s, the floats began to get a little bit better. The one below is from the 1961 season.


Tomorrow I will post some from the 1960’s through the 1980’s.

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