National Champions

National Champions

Monday, April 24, 2017

April 24th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Howard’s Rock In 1980’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is a unique photo of Howard’s Rock in the mid 1980’s as the Tigers prepare to run down the hill. Notice the gloves on the offensive lineman…something that was very common during this era.

In the early 1960s, the rock was given to then head coach Frank Howard by a friend, Samuel Columbus Jones (Clemson Class of 1919). On September 24, 1966, the first time Clemson players ran by the rock and the Tigers beat conference rival Virginia, 40-35.

Howard, seizing on the motivational potential of "The Rock", told his players, "Give me 110% or keep your filthy hands off of my rock."

The team started rubbing the Rock for the first game of 1967, which was a 23-6 waxing of ACC foe Wake Forest.

It is now a tradition for the Clemson Army ROTC to "protect" the Rock for the 24 hours prior to the Clemson-South Carolina game when held in Death Valley. ROTC cadets keep a steady drum cadence around the rock prior to the game, which can be heard across the campus. Part of the tradition comes after unknown parties vandalized the Rock prior to the 1992 Carolina-Clemson game.

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Sunday, April 23, 2017

April 23rd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Wannamaker Hall In Mid 1940’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Wannamaker Hall taken just after World War II.

One striking note from the photo is the number of cars parked. Prior to the WWII, very few Clemson students had access to cars. But as cadets came home from Europe and the Pacific, they were settling into homes and purchasing cars at a rapid pace. Obviously, parking was an issue at Clemson in the mid 1940’s as it is today!

Wannamaker Hall is a 1930s-era residence hall that was originally named Barracks #7. It is the northwesterly-most of the five halls that make up the Greek Quad on the West Campus of Clemson University. The building's back side faces Historic Riggs Field.

Completed in 1936 as a new barracks to house cadets of Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina, the architect was the J. E. Sirrine Company, with Clemson professor Rudolph E. Lee as consulting architect. A complete renovation of Wannamaker Hall was undertaken in 2005, with Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas, architects.

The structure is named for John Edward Wannamaker, a Life Trustee of Clemson Agricultural College, and the last surviving member of the Board of Trustees named in the will of Thomas Green Clemson. In 1929, he was elected President of the Board, replacing the recently deceased Alan Johnstone of Newberry, South Carolina.

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Saturday, April 22, 2017

April 22nd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Loggia At Clemson


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of the Loggia design of Johnstone Hall, a unique architectural design of its era.

The Loggia was built as a focal point to the rather unusual architectural style that was incorporated in the design of Johnstone Hall. The Loggia was located at approximately the same location as the old Second Barracks sat for so many years and was built in the 1950’s.

One of the more unusual features in the design of the Loggia, was its ceiling. The honeycomb design is different than any other building at Clemson.


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Friday, April 21, 2017

April 21st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

More Funny Photos Through The Years


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are a humorous look at Clemson through the eyes of some photographers and students that had a nice sense of humor.

The above picture is of Frank Howard cutting up at a pep rally prior to a football game.

The next photo is from Johnstone Hall in the 1960’s.


The final picture helps answer the age old question of what really is in the mystery meat at Schilletter!


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Thursday, April 20, 2017

April 20th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Death Valley Sunset In 1983

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is a unique sunset picture taken shortly after the completion of the North Upper Deck.

I can confirm it is just after the construction of the North Upper Deck because you can see that the “Tigers” is not painted on the upper deck seats yet. The North Upper Deck was completed in 1983 and I believe the “Tigers” script was painted in 1984. That would date the picture sometime in the summer of 1983.

A couple of notes regarding expansion of Memorial Stadium through the years: In 1958, 18,000 sideline seats were added to Memorial Stadium and in 1960, 5,658 west end zone seats were added in response to increasing attendance. The original cedar wood seating was replaced in 1972 by aluminum seats.

As attendance continued to skyrocket, an upper deck was added to each side of the stadium. The south upper deck (Top Deck South) was added in 1978 and the north upper deck (Top Deck North) in 1983. This put the total capacity over 80,000, which made it one of the largest on campus stadiums in the United States.

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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

April 19th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Classic Tailgating Car And Fiberglass Tiger



 (Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of a great looking classic car decked out in Tiger Orange!

The above picture was taken on a fall afternoon in Clemson prior to a football game in the mid 1960’s. The car would show up at almost every home football game, and this picture was taken in the Tillman Hall loop.

If you notice, the car has the number ’42 on the side door panel. I believe the significance of the ’42 is to honor the class of 1942 and their 25th Anniversary of graduation (which would have been in 1967).

Below is a black and white picture taken of the car with member of the class of 1942 standing beside it. Worth notice from this class of students…almost all of them upon graduation would have entered the service and fought in World War II, which we had just entered in December of 1941 (just 4 months before the Class of ’42 graduated). Therefore, this picture may represent a majority of that depleted Class of ’42, many of which perished fighting for our nation.


After posting the blog last June with the above photo, I received an email from Terry Pierce who updated me on the current location of the fiberglass Tiger that was seen above the classic Clemson car from the 1960’s that was posted in the original blog. Terry sent me some updated pictures of the Tiger and here is the excerpt from his email:

The story behind the Tiger comes from the late Ruby Ellenburg. Mrs. Ruby Ellenburg, who lived on Flat Rock Road in Liberty, bought the Tiger in the late sixties or early seventies for her daughter-in-law Brenda who is a Clemson grad. Brenda wasn't impressed so Ruby stuck it under the bushes in front of her house where only its head was visible. There it stayed until 2007.


My in-laws lived next door to the Ellenburg’s and during a visit my wife decided she just had to have that Tiger so she called Brenda who was glad to be rid of it. So we cleaned it up, loaded it into the SUV and took it home to Lenoir City, Tennessee.

The Tiger is fiberglass and at one time had wooden fangs. Unfortunately, although overall it survived thirty years outdoors relatively unscathed, all but one of its fangs have rotted away and only the nails that they were attached to remain.


Also it had a wooden base but it was in pretty bad shape so we removed it too. Now he just prowls my basement and the cat plays on him! I wish I knew more about who Ruby bought the Tiger from but unfortunately no one thought to ask her before she passed.

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Tuesday, April 18, 2017

April 18th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tillman Hall In The Snow-1940’s

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the 1940’s and shows a beautiful Bowman Field and Tillman Hall after a fresh winter snow.

In this photo, Tillman Hall was just becoming Tillman Hall. Prior to 1946, the building was called the Main Building. This was the case for the first half of the twentieth century.

The building was formally named Tillman Hall in honor of Governor Benjamin Tillman, one of the seven original trustees of Clemson, by the Board of Trustees at their meeting in the first week of July, 1946.

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Monday, April 17, 2017

April 17th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Snow Storm Fun From 1970’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today we will step back to the 1970’s and a snowstorm that hit Clemson and provided some fun for Clemson students when classes were cancelled.

The above photo shows some students using their “talents” to make two snowmen. In the background, you can see students sledding down the hill leading up to the Clemson House. It was not uncommon for students to “borrow” dining treys from a dining hall to use as a sled.


The next picture is a typical photo anytime you have snow and kids. An old fashion snowball fight was due to break out anytime you had a snow.


In this next picture, you can see someone has tied a rope to the back of the car in an effort to provide a pull a sled through campus.

And the final picture today is of some enterprising Clemson students who poured water down the driveway outside of Johnstone Hall. With the cold temperatures, the water froze and provided a slick track to slide down to pass the time one evening.

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Sunday, April 16, 2017

April 16th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Little 372 and John Logan Marshall



(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of Little 372, a plan born out of the imagination and skill of a Clemson legend, John Logan Marshall.

John Logan Marshall was born in Greenwood in 1885 and graduated from Clemson in 1909 with a B.S. in mechanical and electrical engineering. After working several years on a farm in Alabama and then at Western Electric in Chicago, Ill., Marshall returned to Clemson in 1917 as shop work instructor.

School administrators quickly took notice of Marshall's talents as an educator and, in 1919, named him an assistant professor. Two years later, he was appointed head of Clemson's wood shop.

Under Marshall’s guidance, several of his students began the Clemson Aero Club in 1927. Known today as the Clemson University Flying Club, it's one of the oldest continuous student organizations on campus.


In 1928, Marshall and seven students from the Aero Club built a single-engine, high-wing airplane that they named Little 372. The plane, made of lumber from Marshall's wood shop, had a wingspan of 23 feet and a 16-foot woodenframed, fabric fuselage. Although it was able to fly only 15-20 feet off the ground, it was much more capable than the students had ever imagined.

Following several student walkouts at Clemson during the 1920s, Marshall's passion and dedication became instrumental in improving student morale. After many lengthy wood shop discussions with his students about the importance of Clemson's future, he organized the Tiger Brotherhood society in 1928. The society, established to help protect and uphold the ideals of Clemson, is still vital today.

Little 372, thought to be the first plane built by college students in the United States, currently hangs in the S.C. State Museum.


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Credit to Clemson Chronicles

Friday, April 14, 2017

April 14th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Homecoming Vs. TCU In 1965


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today we'll conclude our step back in time to the 1965 Homecoming weekend in Clemson. We'll look at a number of photos to give you an idea of what it was like to be a student in those days.


The game on Saturday was a matchup between Clemson and Texas Christian. The game was a defensive struggle in which the Tigers held TCU to just 72 total yards of offense. The only score of the game came in the last few minutes of the first half as Frank Pearce kicks a 26-yard field goal.


Back in the 1960’s, the game on Saturday was just the warm up act for the big Homecoming Dance in Harcombe Hall on Saturday night. Here, Clemson students exit Death Valley after the conclusion of the game to get ready for the dance.


Dances, featuring rock and roll bands, were the craze of the 1960’s. That was no exception in Clemson as you can see from this picture from the Saturday Night Homecoming Dance in 1965.


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Thursday, April 13, 2017

April 13th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Homecoming Weekend, 1965


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today we'll take a step back in time to the 1965 Homecoming weekend in Clemson. We'll look at a number of photos to give you an idea of what it was like to be a student in those days.

As with Homecoming weekends today, the 1965 Homecoming weekend starts with Tigerama on Friday night. In the photo above, a fraternity is satirizing the “Girls Dorm” with plenty of punch lines and guys dressed as gals. That seems to be a popular topic to use for Tigerama as I have seen similar skits myself over the years.

Below is another skit from the Friday Night festivities at Tigerama.


At the conclusion of Tigerama "Miss Clemson" is crowned. In 1965 that honor goes to Nina Dulin.


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Wednesday, April 12, 2017

April 12th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

25th Anniversary Football Reunion In 1981


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is not only historic, but a little bit unique and maybe even a little spooky! The above photo was taken on October 10th, 1981 in the pregame of the Clemson/Virginia football game on a wet day in Death Valley.

This is a photo of the 1956 football team that was celebrating its 25th Anniversary of their Orange Bowl Berth. The 1956 team went 7-1-2 during the season and was invited to play Colorado in the 1956 Orange Bowl, capping a great season for Frank Howard’s boys.

This photo was taken during the Homecoming weekend in 1981, when the buzz for Clemson’s National Title run was just beginning to make noise. At that point in the 1981 season, we were 4-0 with a big win against Georgia and had just entered the National polls. Nobody, even in their wildest dreams, thought that just 2 1/2 months later, the 1981 team would be returning to the Orange Bowl to play for the National Championship.

All of the talk of the Orange Bowl on this day was about the 1956 team…but that talk would soon change to Clemson as the Tigers rolled to an 11-0 regular season. Celebrating an Orange Bowl month...just a few months before Danny Ford would lead Clemson back to the Orange Bowl and the biggest moment in Clemson football history.


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Tuesday, April 11, 2017

April 11th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Cheerleaders In Mid 1970’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is a humorous one from the mid 1970’s and shows two Clemson cheerleaders having a bit of fun during a football game. The cheerleading uniforms, much more modest during this era, is not the only thing that has evolved since the 1970’s when it comes to giving school spirit at football games.

The school mascot since 1939, the Country Gentleman, and the playing of "Dixie" at the beginning of pre-game shows at football games, were both banished after 1971. The "Rat Class"' "Rat Cheer" also faded away after the last Rat class of 1971, only preserved in the "Unhymnal".

The primary Clemson cheer, "C-L-E-M, in Cadence Count" has evolved since the 1970s, removing “fight Tigers, fight damn it, fight, fight, fight” from the end and keeping only the “fight-fight”. You can still hear “traditionalists” use “damn it” during the cheers today.

A latter-day concession to political correctness may be found in the change in Tiger Band's fourth quarter tuba cheer to the tune of the Budweiser Clydesdale theme, in which band members have sung for thirty years, "I need a beer, I need a beer, I need a...", ad infinitum.

Now, Tiger Band is singing "I need a milk, I need a milk, I need a...".

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Credit to clemsonwiki

Sunday, April 9, 2017

April 9th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Frank Howard And Clemson's 1st Football Team


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s above photo from 1940 and was taken at an IPTAY meeting. In the photo, a young Frank Howard, in his first year as Head Coach at Clemson, is sampling some fried chicken along with R.G. Hamilton (on the right.)

Not many Clemson fans know R.G. Hamilton, but you should. Hamilton was the captain of Clemson's first football team in 1896. Below is some information on Clemson's first football team from an article on Clemson’s web site:

After grueling practices, the first-ever Clemson football game day finally arrived. On October 31, 1896, Clemson traveled to Furman (probably by train). George Swygert, center on the first Clemson football team, recalls the Furman game and the first season as follows:

"With Professor Riggs as our coach we got in shape fairly well. Our first game was with Furman, the biggest men I have ever seen, and believe it or not we won that game. We had a few trick plays. One was when the play ended near the side lines, our lightest end would hide the ball under his sweater and as the two teams moved toward the center of the field for the next play, he appeared to be injured, and then when things were clear, he made a bee-line for the goal. This worked maybe once a game, it worked against Furman our first game."

Very few details of the Clemson-Furman game are known, but it is known that Charlie Gentry scored Clemson's first touchdown in history. The Tigers defeated Furman 14-6 at Greenville, SC. Below is a rare photo of Clemson's first football team.


Clemson's upset win over Furman was a monumental milestone for the school. Furman was considered at the time an experienced team having played the game since 1889, (the year Clemson was founded).

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April 15th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tiger Baseball From 1948 On Riggs Field


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the 1930’s and 1940’s and shows the area surrounding the old Clemson Post Office (now Mell Hall).

The above photo shows the construction of the Clemson Post Office in 1940. This building was purchased by the university in 1973 and became Mell Hall.

This location was not always the Clemson Post Office. The below photo is from the early 1930s and shows the area where Mell Hall now stands. The photo was taken on Bowman Field with the old YMCA out of view on the left and the old location of Dan's Sandwich Shop on the right. The building on the left with white columns is the old Methodist church. The small white building in the background is what would later be an AMOCO gas station. The parking lot in the foreground is where Mell Hall now stands.



This final photo is taken from a plane that shows not only that area, but a good deal of the campus in the early 1930s. You can see Riggs Field, where Clemson Baseball was played during the era. The large white flat area that is there behind Godfrey Hall are tennis courts.



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April 10th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Old Photo Of Bowman Field and Tillman Hall


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is a very old picture of Tillman Hall and Bowman Field with Clemson Cadets on parade.

Tillman Hall is not the oldest building on the campus, but it is one of the most recognized buildings at Clemson. It overlooks Bowman Field and was dedicated in 1891 and was originally called "The Agricultural Building."

Known as the Main Building for the first half of the twentieth century, it was formally named Tillman Hall in honor of Governor Benjamin Tillman, one of the seven original trustees of Clemson, by the Board of Trustees at their meeting in the first week of July, 1946.

Today, Tillman Hall houses the Eugene T. Moore School of Education, the school of Technology and Human Resources, and the Calhoun Honors College. Tillman Hall also has a small auditorium that is often used for guest speakers or small presentations. AFROTC is also located in Tillman Hall.

The building itself was completed in 1893 and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

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Saturday, April 8, 2017

April 8th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

First Friday Parade In 1977


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the 1977 First Friday Parade. The above picture shows a Clemson Fraternity moving up College Avenue on their way to the Outdoor Theatre for the Pep Rally. Check out the sign on Mr. Knickerbocker’s to the right side of the picture!

When this photo was taken, the First Friday Parade was only in its 3rd year. Started in 1974, the First Friday Parade has been held the Friday afternoon before the first home football game to celebrate the new football season.

The parade tradition began in September 1974 in response to a perceived lack of spirit and morale about the Clemson University football team's prospects. 1967 was the last time the Tigers had had a winning season and the first two games for 1974 were played away with Texas A&M crushing Clemson, 24-0, and N.C. State beating the Tigers, 31-10. The brothers of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity began rabble-rousing with Central Spirit to throw a parade to buck up Tiger spirits before the first home game with Georgia Tech, so on Friday, September 27, 1974 was born the "Wreck Tech" Parade. It wound from the old Winn-Dixie parking lot (now the Blue Heron location), up the hill on College Avenue through downtown Clemson and ended at the Amphitheatre where an enthusiastic pep rally was held. It had the desired effect. The following day the Tigers beat the Yellow Jackets, 21-17, and the team went onto an undefeated home record of 7-4 while Coach Red Parker was named ACC Coach of the Year.


In 1975, Clemson opened at home against the Tulane Green Waves and the First Friday Parade was named the "Dam the Wave" Parade. Eventually the habit of naming individual parades was dropped and the event became known universally as the First Friday Parade.

The route of the parade has been twice altered. It originally began at the bottom of the hill on College Avenue at the old Winn-Dixie parking lot and went to the Amphitheatre. After the parade was "removed" from downtown, post-1982, following a particularly debauched example of Clemson "Spirit", it began up the Old Greenville Highway near the east entrance to the campus and proceeded to the Amphitheatre. In recent years, the origin has been the same, but the pep rally has been located west to historic Riggs Field where the parade concludes for a women's soccer game.

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Friday, April 7, 2017

April 7th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Band Day-1965


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo was taken on Band Day on September 18th, 1965 and shows the North Stands during the pregame. Clemson was hosting NC State on this day and high school bands from around the upstate converged on Death Valley for the event.

You can see the IPTAY in the endzones, something that was prominent during this era at Death Valley. In the top center of the picture, you can see what is now Lot 2. Notice there are no cars parked there. This is because what is now Lot 2 was the football practice fields in 1965.

On the left of the pictures, you can see the prefabs in the location that is today Littlejohn Coliseum. These prefabs were for Clemson students who were married.

Clemson was the co-ACC Champion in 1965, compiling a 5-5 record. Jimmy Addison was the QB for the Tigers in 1965 and he often handed the ball to Buddy Gore. Here is a picture of the game program from the game, depicting Little Red Riding Hood, aka the Tiger.


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Thursday, April 6, 2017

April 6th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tiger Baseball In Early 1990’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the early 1990’s and shows a couple of photos of Tiger Baseball.

Some prominent Clemson players during this era were Khalil Greene, Mike Holtz, Billy McMillan, Shane Monahan, Keith Williams, Scott Winchester, and Kris Benson.


Clemson advanced to the College World Series in 1991 and continued a streak of 20+ straight years of making the NCAA Tournament.

Clemson won the ACC Tournament in 1991, 1993, and 1994 and won the Regular Season in 1991, 1993, and 1994.

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Wednesday, April 5, 2017

April 5th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Bill Wilhelm and 1980’s Tiger Baseball


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the 1980’s and shows several photos of Tiger Baseball. Bill Wilhelm, often referred to as the “Daddy Rabbit” of baseball in the ACC.

Wilhelm was at the helm at Clemson during the late 1980’s. To comprehend the scope of Bill Wilhelm’s tenure at Clemson, one has to look at his numbers. Wilhelm’s teams won 1,161 games and six times played in the College World Series. He won 19 ACC regular-season titles and seven tournament championships, and his team made 17 NCAA tournament appearances. He never had a losing season.

In this second photo, you can see how much open grass was on the 3rd base line at Tiger Field below Jervey Gym during that era. Most of that has been replaced permanent stands and bleachers today.


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Tuesday, April 4, 2017

April 4th Clemson Historic Picture of The Day

Late 1980’s Tiger Baseball

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the late 1980’s and shows several photos of Tiger Baseball.

Clemson produced some excellent ball players in the mid 1980’s, including Brian Barnes, Jerry Brooks, Brian Kowitz, Mike Milchin, and Bill Spiers.

Clemson advanced to the NCAA Regionals from 1987-1989, including an ACC Championship in 1989.

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Monday, April 3, 2017

April 3rd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1980’s Tiger Baseball


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the 1980’s and shows several photos of Tiger Baseball.

The above photo is from the Tiger bullpen as players stay loose between innings. Clemson produced some excellent ball players in the early 1980’s, including Mark Davidson, Jimmy Key, John Pawloski, and Danny Shaeffer.

Clemson advanced to the College World Series in 1980 and win ACC Championships in 1980 and 1981.

Below is a photo of a bat girl on a beautiful Spring afternoon at Tiger Field in the early 1980’s.


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Sunday, April 2, 2017

April 2nd Clemson Historic Picture OF The Day

1969 Clemson vs. Georgia


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the 1969 Clemson/Georgia Game in Death Valley. The game was played on September 27th, 1969 and Georgia would go on to a 30-0 win over the Tigers.

Mike Cavan was at the QB position for UGA that day. Cavan went on to become the head coach at Valdosta State University (1986–1991), East Tennessee State University (1992–1996), and Southern Methodist University (1997–2001), compiling a career college football record of 89–83–2.

Cavan was also an assistant coach at Georgia from 1977 to 1985, a part of some memorable Clemson/UGA games during that era.

While jerseys from that era were typically plain, I think Clemson had some really sharp looking uniforms in that era.

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Saturday, April 1, 2017

April 1st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Late 1930's and Early 1940's Mell Hall


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the 1930’s and 1940’s and shows the area surrounding the old Clemson Post Office (now Mell Hall).

The above photo shows the construction of the Clemson Post Office in 1940. This building was purchased by the university in 1973 and became Mell Hall.

This location was not always the Clemson Post Office. The below photo is from the early 1930s and shows the area where Mell Hall now stands. The photo was taken on Bowman Field with the old YMCA out of view on the left and the old location of Dan's Sandwich Shop on the right. The building on the left with white columns is the old Methodist church. The small white building in the background is what would later be an AMOCO gas station. The parking lot in the foreground is where Mell Hall now stands.



This final photo is taken from a plane that shows not only that area, but a good deal of the campus in the early 1930s. You can see Riggs Field, where Clemson Baseball was played during the era. The large white flat area that is there behind Godfrey Hall are tennis courts.



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