National Champions

National Champions

Friday, July 21, 2017

43 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

43 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Eric Harmon


Today’s photo is of Eric Harmon, who lettered for Clemson at right guard from 1987-1990.

Harmon was a 6-foot-1, 282-pound lineman who started over 40 games which (at the time) was more than any other offensive lineman in school history.

During his senior season, Harmon led the Tigers with 38 knockdowns and had 235 for his career, 11 shy of the school career record.

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July 21st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Classic Tailgating Car And Fiberglass Tiger


 (Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of a great looking classic car decked out in Tiger Orange!

The above picture was taken on a fall afternoon in Clemson prior to a football game in the mid 1960’s. The car would show up at almost every home football game, and this picture was taken in the Tillman Hall loop.

If you notice, the car has the number ’42 on the side door panel. I believe the significance of the ’42 is to honor the class of 1942 and their 25th Anniversary of graduation (which would have been in 1967).

Below is a black and white picture taken of the car with member of the class of 1942 standing beside it. Worth notice from this class of students…almost all of them upon graduation would have entered the service and fought in World War II, which we had just entered in December of 1941 (just 4 months before the Class of ’42 graduated). Therefore, this picture may represent a majority of that depleted Class of ’42, many of which perished fighting for our nation.


After posting the blog last June with the above photo, I received an email from Terry Pierce who updated me on the current location of the fiberglass Tiger that was seen above the classic Clemson car from the 1960’s that was posted in the original blog. Terry sent me some updated pictures of the Tiger and here is the excerpt from his email:

The story behind the Tiger comes from the late Ruby Ellenburg. Mrs. Ruby Ellenburg, who lived on Flat Rock Road in Liberty, bought the Tiger in the late sixties or early seventies for her daughter-in-law Brenda who is a Clemson grad. Brenda wasn't impressed so Ruby stuck it under the bushes in front of her house where only its head was visible. There it stayed until 2007.


My in-laws lived next door to the Ellenburg’s and during a visit my wife decided she just had to have that Tiger so she called Brenda who was glad to be rid of it. So we cleaned it up, loaded it into the SUV and took it home to Lenoir City, Tennessee.

The Tiger is fiberglass and at one time had wooden fangs. Unfortunately, although overall it survived thirty years outdoors relatively unscathed, all but one of its fangs have rotted away and only the nails that they were attached to remain.


Also it had a wooden base but it was in pretty bad shape so we removed it too. Now he just prowls my basement and the cat plays on him! I wish I knew more about who Ruby bought the Tiger from but unfortunately no one thought to ask her before she passed.

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Thursday, July 20, 2017

July 21st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Dan’s Sandwich Shop In 1950’s

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Dan’s Sandwich Shop (Current Location of TD’s) in the 1950’s. This corner has a long history at Clemson with a variety of restaurants occupying the space.

Early in the 1940’s a restaurant named College Cafe occupied the space. In 1952, Dan Gentry opened Dan's Restaurant directly across from the town's post office and served hamburgers. "Judge" Keller would walk up from his store for lunch there.

After a fire in 1965, Dan set-up cooking burgers on the sidewalk outside the next day. Gentry would later purchase the building beside his original Dan’s and expand into the biggest hamburger joint in Clemson during the 1960’s and 1970’s. Tomorrow, I will have some pictures of the expanded Dan’s.

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Wednesday, July 19, 2017

45 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

45 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Justin Watts


Justin Watts played wide receiver at Clemson from 1996-2000.

Watts came to Clemson as a heralded quarterback prospect from South Florence. In his first week of practice, he moved to wide receiver.

In the 10th game of his freshman year, Watts tore his knee up and a year later tore up his other knee against Florida State.

That prompted the very unusual circumstance of lettering 5 years in a sport. Watts became the first Clemson football player since 1919 to earn five letters.

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July 20th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Memorial Stadium From The Air In 1955

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from high above Memorial Stadium at halftime of a game in 1955. As you can see from the picture, Clemson Cadets are coming back into the stands after being on the field at halftime.

The 1955 Tigers were 7-3 overall and 3-1 in the ACC, which was good enough for a 3rd place finish in the ACC. The Tiger QB’s in 1955 were Charlie Bussey and Don King. Joel Wells and Billy O’Dell were the running backs on that team.

This was the last year that Clemson was a military institution. This group of Cadets on the field in this picture were the last group to have this honor at Clemson.

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Tuesday, July 18, 2017

46 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

46 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Don Testerman


Today’s photo is of Don Testerman, who lettered for Clemson at running back from 1974-1975.

Testerman’s biggest day as a Tiger was in 1974 when the Tigers travelled to Knoxville to take on Tennessee. After the Tennessee kick-off, Clemson struck from long yardage with Testerman running 68 yards over right-tackle for a touchdown giving the Tigers a 28-21 lead with 7:16 left.

Testerman would finish the day with 146 yards and 1 td in the loss to Tennessee.

Testerman played in 4 NFL seasons from 1976-1980 for the Seattle Seahawks and the Miami Dolphins. Here is a link to some info about Testerman’s time with the Seattle Seahawks. http://www.beckys-place.com/testerman

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July 19th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1950’s Memorial Stadium Press Box

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today's photos are of the early 1950's and the Press Box at Memorial Stadium. As you can see from the picture above, the area was small and cramped.

Lou Sahadi writes of some of the antics that went on during this era in the press box.

"Frank Howard always enjoyed a good rapport with the press. Basically, he always made time to accommodate the writers and radio announcers who covered the team.”

“One of his favorite writers in the early 1940's was Carter "Scoop" Latimer, who worked for the Atlanta American. If there was one thing that Latimer liked besides writing, it was drinking. Sometimes he mixed the two, which didn't always work out too well. “

“Yet, Scoop had enough friends to bail him out of trouble. Once, when he was covering a Clemson game, he got so drunk he couldn't finish writing his story and passed out in the press box. His cronies bailed him out. Several kept filing stories over the Western Union wire. After they had sent six of them, the newspaper sent back a message to stop, it didn't need any more Clemson stories."

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Monday, July 17, 2017

47 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

47 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Wyndie "Dumb-Dumb" Wyndham

Wyndie Wyndham played blocking back on offense and linebacker on defense from 1948-1950.

Here is an excerpt from Frank Howard’s Book, Howard: The Clemson Legend

When Wyndham first came to Clemson everybody called him 'Friendly'. I didn't know at first why they called him that- because he was the most unfriendly boy on the team - but I later found out that Friendly was actually his given middlename.

You hear a lot nowadays about how quarterbacks 'audible' at the line of scrimmage to change the play that was called in the huddle. We did that 50 years ago. We did it by adding and subtracting . One day at practice we were running a play. I think I had called for them to run 54. But I saw that the tackle was in too close and the play wouldn't go so I hollered, "Add two!"

Well, 'Friendly' Wyndham was bumfuddled altogether. He stopped and he came back and said, "Whatta you mean, coach?" I said, "Well, I'll tell you. The play I called was 54. Add two used to make that 56. I don't know what it is now, but I think it's still 56. And I want you to run 56."

Then I looked at him and said, "Boy, you're so dumb you ought not to be one, you ought to be twins." After that, all his teammates didn't call him 'Friendly' anymore. Or just 'Dumb'. Because of my remark about twins they started callinghim 'Dumb-Dumb'.

But he was a great one. In 1950 we was playing Missouri out there. We got ahead of one of Coach (Don) Faurot'steams. It was in September -- the second game of the season - and it was hot as the devil. We were playing some two platoon football then, although Dumb-Dumb played in both the offensive backfield as a blocking back and at linebacker on defense.

I started substituting freely because of the heat and the fact that we were comfortably ahead. I wanted everybody to geta chance to play. Dumb-Dumb came up to me and said, "Coach, how about not putting more than six of them sorry ones in on defense with me at one time. I can protect six of them, but I don't think I can protect more than six."

Missouri had scored in its last 125 games. It was something like 13 or 14 seasons since they'd been shut out. They hadn't scored on us up to that point and Dumb-Dumb said he'd like to be a part of stopping their string. So I told Dumb-Dumb that I'd stand on the 50-yard line and that I'd have all the players I wanted to get in the game on defense stay to my left. I'd have all the offensive players stand to my right. Then I told him he could be in charge of the defensive substituting as long as he saw that everybody got in the game.

We were getting ready to kick off to them after scoring a touchdown. It was a high, but short kick. They had a big 'oltackle. He was about 6-6 and weighed about 290 back in the days when boys wasn't so big. That big tackle backed up under the ball and had his hands up in the air to catch it.

The second the ball touched his hands, Dumb-Dumb hit him right in the stomach and knocked him cold. They recovered the ball and went on offense. The right halfback ran with it. Dumb-Dumb tackled him and knocked him out. The fullback ran with it on the next play and Dumb-Dumb knocked him out. Then the left halfback ran with it and he knocked him out.

That's when the Missouri captain went up to the referee and asked him to "get that wild so-and-so out of this game before he kills every one of us." Dumb-Dumb made sure all the subs - the boys he called 'the sorry ones' - got in the game, but we still managed to shut them out, 34-0.

We blanked four teams that year - Presbyterian, 55-0; Missouri, 34-0; North Carolina, 27-0; and Auburn, at Auburn,41-0 in the last regular season game. Then we beat Miami in the Orange Bowl. We didn't lose a game that season. Our only blemish was a 14-14 tie with South Carolina in one of those 'Big Thursday' games.

We ended the season 10-0-1and ranked 10th in the Associated Press poll. Going back to that 1949 Gator Bowl game, one play Dumb-Dumb made in it I'll always remember. The Missouri quarterback was named Harold Entsminger - and he was a good 'un. He pitched to one of his halfbacks –Nick Carras or Dick Braznell - I don't remember which one. Then Entsminger was leading the interference.

Dumb-Dumb was backing up the line. Well, he ran over the quarterback to get at the ball carrier and he knocked both of them out.

Dumb-Dumb was a killer.

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July 18th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tigers Upset NC State In 1962 ACC Tournament Behind Press Maravich


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Clemson Head Press Maravich being carried off the court in the 1962 ACC Tournament after the Tigers stunned NC State in Greensboro. The Tigers were only 12-15 overall during the 1961-1962 season and was only 4-10 in the ACC Regular Season.

After this stunning upset, the Tigers would defeat Duke the following day to advance to the ACC Championship Game against Wake Forest. The Duke win in the semifinals of that tournament, 77-72, on March 2, 1962, was the highest-ranked win in Clemson history to that point.

Clemson would fall 77-66 to the Demon Deacons in that title game, but the run was the highlight of the Press Maravich tenure at Clemson.

Maravich had a record of 55-96 at Clemson and his best year in 1961-1962. Maravich still holds the Clemson record for winning percentage in overtime games, 3-0, in 1956-1957, and he also had a 23-19 career mark in games decided by five points or fewer, also a Clemson record.

Maravich left Clemson and became an assistant coach at N.C. State before moving up to the head coaching position when Everett Case retired. Maravich later became head coach at Louisiana State University where he coached his son, Pete, who went on to become the leading scorer in NCAA history. (Even in 2013, "Pistol Pete" is still the all-time leading National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I scorer with 3,667 points scored and an average of 44.2 points per game.)

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Sunday, July 16, 2017

48 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

48 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Jim Stuckey


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Jim Stuckey Lettered In 1976, 1977, 1978, and 1979 Stuckey was born in Cayce, South Carolina and attended Airport High School in West Columbia, South Carolina. While at Airport from 1972-76, Stuckey played middle linebacker and tight end.

Stuckey played for Clemson from 1976 to 1979. As a senior in 1979, he earned consensus first-team All-American honors. He was drafted in the first round of the 1980 NFL Draft by the 49ers. He was a member of the San Francisco 49ers Super Bowl XVI and Super Bowl XIX winning teams.


One of his more notable accomplishments was sealing a victory over the Dallas Cowboys in the 1981 NFC title game by recovering a fumble from quarterback Danny White with less than thirty seconds left in the game.

However, this is not well known to most NFL fans, as it was preceded by The Catch, which was caught by his college teammate Dwight Clark, one of the most famous plays in NFL Lore.

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Credit to clemsontigers.com and wikipedia

44 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

44 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day
Banks McFadden


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Banks McFadden, who lettered for Clemson at tailback from 1937-1939.

McFadden attended Great Falls High School in South Carolina, where he led the Red Devils to two state championships in football and one in basketball. McFadden is widely considered to be the greatest athlete in Clemson University history, lettering in three sports (football, basketball and track).

In 1939, McFadden was voted the Associated Press' "Athlete of the Year". McFadden was also a two-time All-American in basketball (1938 and 1939) and led the Tigers basketball team to a Southern Conference championship in 1939.


Upon graduating, McFadden played football for the National Football League's Brooklyn Dodgers. McFadden fought in World War II and upon returning to the United States went into coaching.

McFadden was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1959. On September 19, 1987, Clemson University retired his basketball No. 23 and football No. 66. In October 2008, the O'Rourke–McFadden Trophy was introduced as a reward to the winner of the annual football game between Boston College and Clemson, in honor of the historic meeting between Charlie O'Rourke and Banks McFadden in the 1940 Cotton Bowl Classic, Clemson's first bowl appearance.

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July 16th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Boxing At Clemson


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos will look at a major sport at Clemson that is no longer a part of the Athletic Department. Boxing was a sport at Clemson in the 1930’s and 1940’s.

The photo above is of a Clemson boxer in a match during the 1942 season. This boxer, with the last name of Brown, defeated his opponent from VPI on this evening in Fike Field House.



This match was the highlight of the 1942 season as no other matches were won during that year. That can be blamed, in part, to the fact that the United States had just joined WWII and many Clemson Cadets were beginning training to enter service.

One other side note: The coach of the 1942 boxing team? None other than Walter Cox.

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Saturday, July 15, 2017

49 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

49 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Cliff Austin


Today's photo is of Cliff Austin, who lettered at Clemson from 1978-1982 as a running back.

Austin sat out the 1979 season after tearing his ACL in the Spring Game. Austin is remembered as a solid running back at Clemson, scoring a touchdown in the Orange Bowl that helped lead Clemson to the National Championship.

Austin was also a part of some unique circumstances at Clemson, something many remember him for even more than his play on the field. Austin was on the Clemson team that traveled to Tokyo, Japan to play Wake Forest in the Mirage Bowl in November of 1982.

At almost the exact moment that the Clemson plane touched down in Japan, word came to Clemson that Austin’s mother had passed away suddenly back in the United States.

Austin was placed on the next available plane back to the states to be with his family. Some accounts have Austin on Japanese soil less than 2 hours.

Austin is possibly best remembered for his role in a strange incident at the 1982 Orange Bowl. Austin was among three or four players that became “stuck” in an elevator for several hours on game day. The Miami Fire Department finally was able to get the players out of the elevator, but the story made the airwaves the night of the game as the NBC commentators made reference to the incident.



On the field, Cliff Austin broke the Clemson record for most rushing yards in a game with 260 in a route of Duke in October of 1982.

Austin was drafted by the New Orleans Saints in the 3rd round in 1983 and went on to a five-year career in the NFL.

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July 15th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

The Story Of IP-O-AY

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are in reference to a short lived and mysterious group at Clemson in the early 1950’s.

IPOAY (I Pay One A Year) is the group that is pictured above. You can see from the flyer on the table that this group started as an athletic fundraising group by having people pay $1 a year to support the program.

This group was created in opposition to IPTAY (I Pay Ten A Year) that was started in the mid 1930’s at Clemson. Below, Frank Howard is out on the community trail drumming up support for IPTAY.


I don’t know what eventually happened to IPTOY, but it obviously fell by the side as IPTAY became the dominant fundraising group at Clemson.

Of course, $10 does not get you very far in IPTAY nowadays!

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Friday, July 14, 2017

50 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

50 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Joe Henderson


Today’s photo is of Joe Henderson, who lettered for Clemson at running back from 1987-1989.

Henderson rushed for 1,752 yards at Clemson during his career, including a 4.9 yard per carry average and 16 touchdowns.

Henderson also was a good kick returner for the Tigers, averaging 26.7 yards per kick return and one touchdown during his career.

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July 14th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Tiger Football in 1976


 (Photos Uploaded By Ed Oliver, Jr.)

Today’s photos are from a follower of this blog and were taken in 1976 on Picture Day in September prior to the start of the season.

Ed Oliver of Seneca sent these photos in and they were taken by his father, who ironically was a Gamecock fan. The photo above shows Coach Red Parker.

The below photo is of senior Joey Walters.


The next photo shows defensive back Malcolm Marler (#22), defensive back Bill Wingo (#16) and defensive back O.J. Tyler (#23). Bill Wingo is the father of South Carolina baseball player Scott Wingo.


The next photo is of the offensive line from 1976, including Jim Wells (#64), Darrell Misenheimer (#73), tight end Mark Clifford (#87), and Lacy Brumley (#69).


The final picture is of defensive tackle Archie Reese (#65).


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Thursday, July 13, 2017

51 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

51 Days Until Kickoff! 

 Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day 

 Ben Boulware 



Ben Boulware lettered at Clemson from 2013-2016 and was the starting linebacker during Clemson’s back to back visits to the College Football Playoffs in 2015 and 2016. Boulware posted 352 tackles, 26 tackles for loss, 8.5 sacks, five interceptions, 41 quarterback pressures, 10 pass breakups, six caused fumbles and four recovered fumbles in 2,131 snaps over 53 games (31 starts) in his career. 



Boulware was the first Tiger in 24 years with a pick-six in a bowl game when he had one against Oklahoma in 2014 and he is the only linebacker in program history with an interception in consecutive bowl games, and they were against the same team (Oklahoma). 



Boulware had 17 career double figure tackle games, and Clemson was 16-1 in those games. Boulware was also a two-time All-ACC Academic Team (2015,16) selection. 

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July 13th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Late 1960’s View Of Campus

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the 1960’s and is the view coming from Highway 93 heading into Clemson. There are a couple of clues that help pin down the actual date of this picture.

Obviously, neither upper deck has been built on Memorial Stadium, which helps date the picture prior to 1978. Littlejohn Coliseum, although almost hidden in this picture, is visible if you look really closely. Littlejohn was completed in 1968, which dates this picture prior to that time.

I am going to take a vague stab and state that this picture is dated somewhere around 1966 or 1967.

What I love about this picture is the view of the Clemson campus. The reason I love the view is this is the exact view I see every game day in Clemson as I come in to town to host the Tiger Pregame Show. When I see this view, I begin to anticipate game day and our Tigers coming down the hill. Even after 30 years of coming to games in Clemson, the stomach still turns a bit when it is game day.

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Wednesday, July 12, 2017

52 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

52 Days Until Kickoff!  

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Buddy Gore


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Buddy Gore Lettered From 1966-1968

Aubrey "Buddy" Gore was Clemson's greatest running back in the 1960s and perhaps during a 22 year period from 1956-78. Gore led the ACC in rushing in consecutive seasons, 1966-67, and was named the ACC Player of the Year as a junior, the first Tiger in history so honored.


Still an avid Clemson fan who looks like he could still play today, Gore carried Clemson to the ACC Championship in 1966 and 1967. His most celebrated performance came in is last game as a junior, at South Carolina. All Gore did was rush for 189 yards in 31 tough carries, leading Clemson to a 23-12 victory.

In addition to leading Clemson to the win over its arch rival, a win that gave Clemson the conference crown, he set the ACC single season rushing record and became Clemson's first 1000-yard rusher in the process.

He ended the season with 1045 yards in just 10 games. Gore also led the ACC in rushing in 1966 when he gained 750 yards. Twice he finished in the top 20 in the nation in rushing, including a number-eight ranking in 1967. That number-eight ranking is still the second highest ranking by a Clemson running back in history. His senior year he accumulated 776 yards, the third straight year he led Clemson in rushing.

While Gore ranks only fourth in Clemson history in career rushing, it must be remembered that he played just three years and 30 games. In his era, freshmen were ineligible and teams played just 10 games per year.

Only Terry Allen has a higher rushing yards per game average over a career, and Gore still holds the school mark for all-purpose running yardage for a career with a 109.1 figure.

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Credit to Theacc.com from article posted in 2009

July 12th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson QB’s In 1965

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo was taken on the sidelines during the 1965 season. I believe this is the season opener for the Tigers against NC State, a game Clemson would win 21-7 on September 18th, 1965.

The player closest to the camera is Jimmy Bell, quarterback for the Tigers. As you can see in the picture, Bell has a headset on talking to coaches up in the press box. We often don’t think about that kind of technology being used in the 1960’s, but you can clearly see that it was. Bell was from Hartsville, SC and I believe he is still practicing Family Medicine in Hartsville today.

A couple of other interesting notes from the picture. Notice the Pepsi cup on the wooden table behind Bell. I find this interesting because I can never recall a time that Coke was not the sponsor at Clemson. Obviously, Pepsi had rights at some point because of the cup in the picture, but I can’t remember anyone other than Coke having rights inside of Death Valley.

I also love the jerseys from this era. The white would look great at home even today in my opinion. I also like the numbers on the helmet.

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Tuesday, July 11, 2017

53 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

53 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Jeff Davis


Jeff Davis, captain of Clemson's 1981 National Championship team, was inducted into the Ring of Honor in 1995. He was a first-team All-American in 1981 when he led the Tigers in tackles.


Davis was also named MVP of the ACC and was the defensive MVP of the Orange Bowl victory over Nebraska, the game that clinched the national title for the Tigers. Davis has the third best mark in career tackles in Clemson history and has also caused the most fumbles and recovered the most fumbles in team history.


He was a fifth-round draft pick of the Tampa Bay Bucs and played for them from 1982-87. He led the team in tackles and was the captain of the team for four seasons.

Along with being in the Clemson Ring of Honor, Davis was inducted into the Clemson Hall of Fame in 1989 and the South Carolina Hall of Fame in 2001. He was named to Clemson's Centennial football team in 1996 and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in December of 2007.

Davis currently works for Clemson as an assistant athletic director. He was honored with the "Use Your Life" Award from Oprah Winfrey's Angel Network in 2001 for his work with the "Call Me Mister" program at Clemson.

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July 11th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Johnstone Hall Signs

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is a familiar sign from the mid 1980’s, showing a sign students erected on the outer facade of Johnstone Hall.

Erected in 1954, the Johnstone Hall complex design became a model for college dormitories, implementing a new raise-slab construction method, a practice which was featured in many architectural magazines at that time. This method - the Youtz-Slick "lift-slab" method - lifted reinforced concrete slabs onto columns with hydraulic jacks. These slabs weighed 224 tons and were nine inches thick, 122 feet long and 43 feet wide.

Johnstone Hall was the largest building complex erected using this method. Campus legend had it that two other similar structures built elsewhere collapsed before completion.

Today, only one of the original Johnstone buildings is still standing on the campus. Most of the rooms had been taken out of use by the mid-1990s as obsolete (electrical wiring wasn't grounded, and is still not grounded in the remaining structure).

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Monday, July 10, 2017

54 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

54 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Terrance Roulhac


Terrance Roulhac played for Clemson from 1983 until 1986 as a wide receiver.

Roulhac was a product of Jacksonville, Florida. Roulhac was one of three Tigers plucked from the Jacksonville area within a three year span. Terrance Flagler and Kenny Flowers were also big recruits from the Jacksonville area that became an integral part of Clemson’s program.

Roulhac had 92 receptions in his career for 1,487 yards and 16 touchdowns. His yard per catch over that period of time was 16.2. Roulhac also had 42 kick returns in his career for a 26.4 yard average.

Roulhac was a part of one of the most dramatic endings in Clemson football history when Clemson traveled between the hedges in 1984 to face the Georgia Bulldogs. Clemson was cruising, up 20-6 at halftime on two Mike Eppley touchdown passes and helped by three interceptions from the defense. Georgia was able to crawl back into the game, tying it at 20 on a one-yard Cleveland Gary touchdown run. The Dawgs took the lead on Kevin Butler's third field goal of the game coming with six minutes to play, but Clemson responded with a 48-yard Donald Igwebuike field goal with 2:10 to go.

Georgia had a final shot to pull off the win when RB Troy Jackson ran for a 24-yard gain, but the drive stalled on the Clemson 45. Facing 4th and nine with :19 to play, Georgia head coach Vince Dooley chose to send out Butler to attempt a college football record-tying 60-yard field goal. Even with the wind slightly in his face, Butler blasted it through for the 26-23 lead with :11 to play.

The Georgia sideline erupted and got nailed for an unsportsmalike conduct penalty. Clemson's Ray Williams fielded the ensuing Butler kickoff and threw it across the field to Terrance Roulhac who took off across midfield. He got down to the Georgia 35 before going out of bounds with what appeared to be one second remaining.

The clock read 0:00 leading to a conference on the field with the officials and coaches. The determination was that the clock had expired, ending the game. Clemson fans in the stadium to this day will tell you that Roulhac went out of bounds before the clock expired and the Tigers should have been afforded the opportunity to kick a tying field goal.

Instead, Butler goes down in history and the game is still regarded one of the best in the history of the rivalry.

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July 10th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1938 Tiger Baseball

(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the 1938 baseball season. The above is a high quality (for the time) team photo of the team.

The below photo is also of the 1938 team and is an action shot of the Tigers playing on what is now the Hoke Sloan Tennis Complex.

The head coach of the 1938 baseball team? None other than Jess Neely.

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Sunday, July 9, 2017

55 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

55 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

O.K. Pressley


Today’s photo is of O.K. Pressley, who lettered at center for Clemson between 1926-1928.

Frank Mellette wrote this about O. K. Pressley in his book:

O. K. Pressley finished Clemson in the Class of 1929 in Animal Science and has retired as a Brigadier General in the Marine Corps. O. K. will always be remembered as one of the best centers that Clemson ever had on any of its football teams and was practically a unanimous choice as All-Southern center his senior year in 1928.

He tells of the days when football players had to be "made of iron" to make up for the lack of protection in their uniforms and equipment." Protective devices were optional and only consisted of thin shoulder pads, a helmet, built like a skull cap, with no knee pads or face masks. I can remember when many college players did not wear a helmet during a game.

The game was so dirty that players often hit each other with their fists or even kicked their opponents in the face. It was the common practice, if a player had something like a sore leg, he would bandage the other to protect the hurt one. The opponents would always try to work on the bandaged limb.

In a game with South Carolina, O. K. saw every player on the first team, except one, carried off the field on a stretcher. The eleventh player walked off the field voluntarily and gave it over completely to the second team.

O. K. said that, on one occasion, a player tackled and then hit him with two stunning blows in the head. A teammate begged him out of fighting this opposing player. If he had fought with him, both of them would have been put out of the game. The opposing team had hoped to get Pressley out so that they would have a much less capable opponent in his place. His fellow player said, "We will take care of him very soon." About two plays later, the player who had hit O. K. was carried unconscious off the field.

O. K. had a scholarship to Furman, due to contacts made by his high school coach, but he would not go there and chose Clemson instead. In spite of making All-Southern in high school, he did not receive any financial aid from Clemson and borrowed much of the money he needed. He was trying to help relieve his parents of the full financial burden of sending him to college.

Since the football candidates had already been chosen before practice started, O. K. did not start with the Clemson team. He was playing intramural football at the YMCA when Mr. Holtzendorf asked if anyone would volunteer to act as a practice dummy for the football team. O. K. volunteered and acted that part during the varsity practice on the following afternoon. He broke up so many varsity plays that he was accused of reading the signals. This accusation was emphatically denied.

The next day and thereafter he was told to work out as a member of the varsity football team instead of playing the part of the practice dummy. However, he "warmed the bench" for the first few games that fall and saw no action whatsoever. Finally, in an off-the-campus game, O. K. was told that the varsity staring center had been left at home and he must take that position in the lineup.

These were the days of the single-wing when the center snapped the ball. This gave him his opportunity and that was all that he needed to show his mettle. He played so well that for the rest of his time at Clemson, he was always in the first-string lineup, except for a few times when he was too injured to play.

O. K. was captain of the 1928 team. In a game against Georgia in 1927, his fingers were bent back against the back of his hand sufficiently that it tore his hand open and disjointed several knuckles. With his great willpower and presence of mind, he snapped the knuckles back into place and went for treatment on the sidelines. However, no hypodermics or other pain killers were given O. K. at any time on the railroad trip back to Clemson from the University of Georgia. As he groaned in agony during the homeward trip, the only first aid that he received was some hot towels on his forehead.

On one occasion, a teammate, Raeford McMillan, relates that O. K. intercepted a pass but was run down and tackled after a considerable gain. They said that it was a comical sight to see Raeford and the Clemson coach running along the sidelines with him cheering and urging him on at the top of their hoarse voices.

O. K. played football for Clemson at an up-and-down time, during which the Tigers were anything but consistent. With most of the important games being played away from home, it made a bad situation. Clemson had such poor facilities for getting and attracting "big name" teams. O. K. Pressley was a victim of the times.

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July 9th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Frank Howard And Clemson's 1st Football Team


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s above photo from 1940 and was taken at an IPTAY meeting. In the photo, a young Frank Howard, in his first year as Head Coach at Clemson, is sampling some fried chicken along with R.G. Hamilton (on the right.)

Not many Clemson fans know R.G. Hamilton, but you should. Hamilton was the captain of Clemson's first football team in 1896. Below is some information on Clemson's first football team from an article on Clemson’s web site:

After grueling practices, the first-ever Clemson football game day finally arrived. On October 31, 1896, Clemson traveled to Furman (probably by train). George Swygert, center on the first Clemson football team, recalls the Furman game and the first season as follows:

"With Professor Riggs as our coach we got in shape fairly well. Our first game was with Furman, the biggest men I have ever seen, and believe it or not we won that game. We had a few trick plays. One was when the play ended near the side lines, our lightest end would hide the ball under his sweater and as the two teams moved toward the center of the field for the next play, he appeared to be injured, and then when things were clear, he made a bee-line for the goal. This worked maybe once a game, it worked against Furman our first game."

Very few details of the Clemson-Furman game are known, but it is known that Charlie Gentry scored Clemson's first touchdown in history. The Tigers defeated Furman 14-6 at Greenville, SC. Below is a rare photo of Clemson's first football team.


Clemson's upset win over Furman was a monumental milestone for the school. Furman was considered at the time an experienced team having played the game since 1889, (the year Clemson was founded).

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Saturday, July 8, 2017

56 Days Until Kickoff! Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Of The Day

56 Days Until Kickoff!

Dark Territory Clemson Letterman Photo Of The Day

Emory Smith


Today’s photo is of Emory Smith, who lettered for Clemson at fullback from 1993-1996.

While a member of the Clemson Tigers he was named the Offensive MVP of the 1993 Peach Bowl.

Many Clemson fans will remember the 1995 Clemson/South Carolina game where Emory had a long run late in the game to secure the win, carrying several Gamecocks on his shoulder before he could be brought down!


After playing of the practice squads of the Green Bay Packers and the Dallas Cowboys of the NFL, Smith played with the Scottish Claymores of NFL Europe during the 1999 season.

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