National Champions

National Champions

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

January 17th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Tiger Baseball In The 1960’s
Part II of II 


(Photos  Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

From April of 1965 until May of 1966, Rusty Adkins had a 41-game hitting streak. Adkins hit .438 during the streak that still stands as the longest in ACC history. 

During the 1966 season, George Sutton set the record for the fastest to 10 home runs by hitting 10 home runs in 18 games. His 10th homer came against Wake Forest on April 23, 1966. 


During the 1967 season, the Tigers won the ACC title and were ranked #7 in the final Collegiate Baseball poll. Clemson participated in the NCAA District III Playoffs at Gastonia, NC. After losing the first contest against Florida State, Clemson rebounded with three straight victories. But Auburn ended Clemson’s season by defeating the Tigers 6-5 in the championship game in 13 innings. 

And in 1968, left-hander John Curtis became Clemson’s first first-round Major League draft selection. Curtis was the #10 overall pick in the secondary phase by the Boston Red Sox. 


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Tuesday, January 16, 2018

January 16th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Tiger Baseball In The 1960’s 
(Part I of II)


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts) 

Today’s photos are from the 1960’s and are a montage of Clemson Tiger baseball, which was played on Riggs Field. In the fall of 1957, from the advice of North Carolina Head Coach Walter Rabb, Frank Howard hired a 27-year old assistant from China Grove, NC named Bill Wilhelm. 

After the 1959 regular season, Clemson, Wake Forest, and North Carolina were tied for first place, forcing a playoff among the three. Clemson beat Wake Forest 4-2 at Thomasville, NC on May 16 and downed North Carolina 9-7 in Gastonia, NC to claim the ACC crown. 


In June of 1959, Clemson raced through the NCAA District III Playoffs at Gastonia, NC, downing Georgia Tech 9-6 and Florida State twice (24-2, 5-0) to advance to Omaha. At the College World Series, the Tigers lost to Arizona 3-2 on June 13 in 12 innings in their first game in Omaha. They bounced back and defeated Colorado State 7-1 the next day, but were eliminated by Penn State 7-0 on June 15. 

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Monday, January 15, 2018

January 15th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Cadets In World War II And Fletcher Anderson 


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts) 

Today’s photos are of Clemson Cadets during World War II. The text below was written by former Clemson kicker Fletcher Anderson (’04) from Clemson World Online. 

Clemson has also produced many war heroes through the years. Jimmie Dyess ’31 was awarded the Carnegie Medal and the Medal of Honor. Dyess is one of three Clemson alumni to receive the Medal of Honor. Gary Evans Foster, a Clemson student in 1919-1920, and Daniel Augustus Joseph Sullivan, Class of 1902, were also awarded our nation’s highest medal for bravery. Rudolf “Rudy” Anderson ’48 was the only casualty in the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. 

The University has monuments to its soldiers. Military Heritage Plaza commemorates a Clemson cadet’s passage from student to military leader and displays 64 medals representing those earned by Clemson military. The monument in front of Mell Hall symbolizes the transition the Class of 1944 experienced during WWII. And just recently, the Clemson Corps launched a new initiative for the Scroll of Honor Memorial at the football stadium. 

Perhaps the quietest memorial is found in the Woodland Cemetery. American flags adorn more than 50 headstones on “Cemetery Hill.” In addition to serving their country, these people served Clemson. 




For example, you probably know that James “Banks” McFadden was a two-sport All-American at Clemson in 1939, but you may not know that he served overseas, 1946-1949, in the U.S. Army Air Corps. He returned to Clemson for a long, productive career with the Clemson Athletic Department. 

Robert C. “Bob” Bradley ’51 entered Clemson as a freshman in 1941. He also served four years in the U.S. Army Air Corps during WWII and returned to Clemson after the war to finish his degree. “Mr. B” went on to touch many lives as Clemson’s sports information director. 

Walter T. Cox Jr. ’39 also impacted the lives of many students during his time at Clemson. He called Clemson home for more than 70 years, and the only time he left was to serve his country during WWII. 

Richard C. Robbins joined the armed forces in 1942 and served first under U.S. Gen. George Patton and later in Okinawa, Japan. Robbins completed two tours of duty in Korea before returning to Clemson to become a student-athlete adviser. Col. Robbins’ reputation suggests that he utilized some of Patton’s techniques to motivate, discipline and carry out his duties at Clemson. 

Others like George C. Means served in the U.S. Coast Guard during the D-Day Normandy Invasion of WWII. Some of the headstone markings indicate the medals they received during their service: “Marvin A. Owings Sr., Col. Army, Bronze Star, Purple Heart & OLC”; “William Joseph Lanham, Captain U.S. Army WWII, Purple Heart and Silver Star.” 

The University’s imprint on the U.S. Armed Forces, and thus our country, is undeniable and unforgettable for so many. Perhaps next time you’re on campus you might visit some of these monuments — including Woodland Cemetery — and say a quiet “thank you” to Clemson’s silent soldiers. 

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Sunday, January 14, 2018

January 14th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Photo Quiz 

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Alan Cutts, the man responsible for digitizing all of these photos for me, came up with a quiz for some of the photos. Today we will quiz you on your knowledge of Clemson through some photos.

Answers will be available at the bottom of the blog each day.

1. Who is the woman in the photo below?


2. The YMCA building was built in 1916, thanks to a $50,000 donation from whom?


3. Hoke Sloan grew up in Clemson and served as the school's tennis coach for many years. However, he never attended Clemson as a student. What educational institution did he attend?


4. Who is the man in the photo below? (Hint: He has a building named after him on the east campus.)


Answers: 
1. Frank Howard's daughter, Alice Howard.
2. John D. Rockefeller gave a $50,000 donation for the building of the YMCA at Clemson.
3. Hoke Sloan attended Auburn.
4. August Schilletter, Steward of Clemson College; in charge of kitchens & mess hall, 1900-1918

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Saturday, January 13, 2018

January 13th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Red Parker And His Second Day Of Head Coaching


(Photo Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Red Parker (left) became Clemson's 19th coach for the 1973 season. When he arrived he told a humorous story as described by Joe Sherman:

"I had just gone to my first coaching job at Fordyce, Arkansas, the hometown of Paul (Bear) Bryant, one of the greatest coaches in the game."

"Fordyce is really a football town and all they could talk about was Bear Bryant this and Bear Bryant that and Bear Bryant the other. As a very young, very green coach, I was intimidated."

"About the second day on the job, I was sitting alone in my cubbyhole of an office when I saw two citizens coming down the hall. When they were about 30 feet away, I grabbed the telephone and started talking, kinda loud.”

"Now look here, Bear, I've told you everything about that offense that I can on the phone. And I've got work to do here. I'll try to get away one day and come down and explain it to you.” ‘By this time the two men were in the door and I held the phone away from my mouth and said to them’, “I'm talking with Bear Bryant right now. Be with you in a minute.”

"Then back to the phone. 'Look, Bear, you'll just have to stop calling me during the season. You and Bobby Dodd are just about running me crazy asking about that offense and defense I'm using. I'll see you after the season and help you all I can’!”

"Then I hung up and turned to the two fellows standing in the doorway. 'I'm sorry, I had to help Bear with a little problem. Now what can I do for you folks?'

"They looked at each other and then one of them said, 'Well, nothing, really, they just sent us over to hook up your phone.' "

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Friday, January 12, 2018

January 12th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Clemson Photo Quiz



(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Alan Cutts, the man responsible for digitizing all of these photos for me, came up with a quiz for some of the photos. Today is Part II of III that will quiz you on your knowledge of Clemson through some photos.

Answers will be available at the bottom of the blog each day.

1. The photo below is of the first president of Clemson. What was his name?


2. John C. Calhoun called his home "Fort Hill" because it overlooked a fortification built around 1776. What was the name of the fortification?


3. As Thomas Green Clemson continued advocating a separate agricultural college, apart from the University of South Carolina, in June 1886 the Columbia institution gave him something, in hopes of diverting him from his goal. What did they give him?

Answers:
1. Clemson's first president was Henry A. Strode.

2. Fort Hill overlooked a fortification called Fort Rutledge, built around 1776.

3. An honorary Doctor of Laws degree, given to Thomas G. Clemson by the University of South Carolina.

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Thursday, January 11, 2018

January 11th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

1930’s Bowman Field


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is from the 1930’s and shows Bowman Field in one of the first photos ever taken of this historic Clemson area.

Named for Randolph T. V. Bowman, an instructor in forge and foundry, and an assistant football coach who died at 23 on April 14, 1899, it was originally the parade ground for Clemson cadets.

Bowman Field has served as the home of Clemson University's first football, baseball, basketball, track and even soccer teams.

As an assistant coach, Bowman had been responsible for much of the clearing of the area, formerly a sedge field. Bowman holds the Clemson distinction of having coached the very first intercollegiate match played at Clemson, a baseball game with Furman on April 24, 1896, which, unfortunately, the Tigers lost, 13-20.

The two 19th-century cannons located on the field were nicknamed Tom and Jerry by the class of 1952.

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Wednesday, January 10, 2018

January 10th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Homecoming Floats Through The Years 




(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are Part I of II taken of Homecoming Floats taken over the course of three decades. It shows how the ingenuity and creativity of these floats evolved through the years.

The above photo is from the 1958 season. That's a Wake Forest Demon Deacon that the Tiger has cornered on a goal post, if you couldn’t tell!

Below is another from the 1958 season. Using gravestones has always been a popular theme for homecoming floats.

In the 1960’s, the floats began to get a little bit better. The one below is from the 1961 season.



Tomorrow I will post some from the 1960’s through the 1980’s.

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Tuesday, January 9, 2018

January 9th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Wreck Tech In 1974 (Part II of II)


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of the “Wreck Tech” Parade in 1974 and is Part I of II in the series.

Prior to 1974 all the Georgia Tech games were played in Atlanta. That trend ended in 1974 when Tech was scheduled to play the Tigers for the first time in Death Valley.


Such a big event called for a parade, the "Wreck Tech" parade. Here are a number of photos from that famous parade in Clemson when Tech first showed up at our doorstep.


By the way, we won the game 21-17. The first of all home games we won in 1974, including a 28-24 win the following week against UGA.

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Monday, January 8, 2018

January 8th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Wreck Tech In 1974 (Part I of II)


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of the “Wreck Tech” Parade in 1974 and is Part I of II in the series.


Prior to 1974 all the Georgia Tech games were played in Atlanta. That trend ended in 1974 when Tech was scheduled to play the Tigers for the first time in Death Valley.

Such a big event called for a parade, the "Wreck Tech" parade. Here are a number of photos from that famous parade in Clemson when Tech first showed up at our doorstep.


By the way, we won the game 21-17. The first of all home games we won in 1974, including a 28-24 win the following week against UGA.

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Sunday, January 7, 2018

January 7th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Sirrine Hall


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are of Sirrine Hall through the years.

Sirrine Hall was named for Joseph E. Sirrine, life trustee of Clemson Agricultural College. Sirrine Hall was built to replace Godfrey Hall as the Textile building.


Sirrien Hall was one of 8 buildings built between 1936 and 1938, and designed by Rudolph E. Lee in an Italian Renaissance Revival style.


Today, the building houses the College of Business. It is a contributing property to the Clemson University Historic District II (NRHP).

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Saturday, January 6, 2018

January 6th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Game Day Parking In 1930’s


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photo is of Bowman Field before a football game in the late 1930’s.

When football games were played on Riggs Field, fans would park their cars on Bowman Field and walk to the games.

In the picture, you can see Sikes Hall in the background.

Notice how tight and in alignment the cars were parked! You don’t exactly see that during a Clemson game in this day and age!

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Friday, January 5, 2018

January 5th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Fike Field House

(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are from the early 1930’s and show the final completion of Fike Field House.

From Clemson World Online:

Anyone familiar with the last 60 years of Clemson history will likely recognize the bedrock significance of names like Walter T. Cox, R.C. Edwards, and Frank Howard. Imagine then, the influence and respect that one man must have wielded for that threesome of Clemson legends to serve as the pallbearers at his funeral. Such a man was Rupert Howard Fike.

Fike, known to most as Rube, was born in Spartanburg County in 1887. He first fell in love with Clemson while peering through a knothole in a fence to see the Tiger football team rout Wofford during the Tigers undefeated season of 1900.


Fike promptly returned home to tell his parents that instead of following their plans for him to attend Wofford, he was going to go to that Clemson. That he did; and in 1908, he graduated from Clemson with a degree in civil engineering. After graduating with his M.D. and returning to South Carolina to open a general practice in Chesnee, Fike became interested in X-ray work and decided to pursue postgraduate studies at Johns Hopkins University.

His thirst for medical knowledge grew, and he studied at the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Harvard University Medical School, the Mayo Clinic and the Curie Institute in Paris. While in Europe, he also observed cancer clinics in England, Italy, Belgium and Germany.

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January 4th Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

I.M. Ibrahim (Part II of II)



(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are Part I of II about Dr. I.M. Ibrahim, the Father of Clemson soccer and the only Clemson coach in any sport to win two national championships. Ibrahim coached the Clemson men's soccer program from its inception in 1967 until his retirement after the 1994 season.

Ibrham had Clemson in the national top 20 by his sixth year and the Tigers won the ACC championship in 1972 with a 13-1-1 record. By 1975, just the ninth year in the program's history, he had Clemson ranked on top of the national polls. He would bring Clemson to a number-one national ranking at some point in nine different seasons in his Clemson career.


Between 1972 and 1979, Clemson won eight consecutive ACC Championships, the longest run of ACC titles in any sport in Clemson history. During that time Clemson did not lose a single league match and posted a 38-0-2 record. Ibrahim finished his career with an overall record of a 388-102-31 for his 28 years and his .774 winning percentage is the second best in Clemson history in any sport among coaches who have served at least four years since the program joined the ACC in 1953.

He had a 32-16 record in NCAA Tournament competition and the .667 winning percentage is among the top 10 winning percentages in NCAA soccer history. His 388 wins rank second in ACC men's soccer history and his .774 winning percentage is also second.

While he had many outstanding seasons, his two national championship campaigns stand out. His 1984 team posted a 22-4 record, but it had a difficult path to win the title. Along the way Clemson had to defeat the top four seeds in the tournament, including a victory over two-time defending champion and number-one ranked Indiana in the championship match. Clemson downed the Hoosiers 2-1 in the Kingdome in Seattle in a match televised nationally on ESPN. It marked the first time in any NCAA Tournament that a team had beaten the top four seeds in the field to win the championship.


In 1987, the Tigers were seeded 23rd, but made a miraculous run with victories on the road against 14th ranked Evansville, top ranked Indiana and sixth ranked Rutgers to reach the Final Four. Clemson was rewarded by playing host to the Final Four that year and the Tigers won the semifinals over eighth ranked North Carolina and the championship over 20th ranked San Diego State.


Clemson defeated San Diego State by a 2-0 score at Riggs Field, the only time Clemson has won a national championship in any sport on its campus.

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Wednesday, January 3, 2018

January 3rd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

I.M. Ibrahim (Part I of II)


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are Part I of II about Dr. I.M. Ibrahim, the Father of Clemson soccer and the only Clemson coach in any sport to win two national championships.

Ibrahim coached the Clemson men's soccer program from its inception in 1967 until his retirement after the 1994 season. Ibrahim coached Clemson to the NCAA Championship in 1984 and 1987 and took Clemson to the NCAA Tournament 17 of his 28 seasons. He led the program to the Final Four of college soccer six times, and won 11 ACC Championships, tied for the most league titles by any coach in Clemson sports history.


Born in Haifa, Israel, he entered the United States in 1960 and attended Shorter College in Rome, GA. In his last two years at Shorter, he played and served as the coach of the soccer program. Upon his graduation from Shorter in 1964, he moved to Clemson where he earned his M.S. and Ph.D in chemistry.

In 1967 Ibrahim approached then Assistant Athletic Director Bill McLellan about forming a varsity soccer program. McLellan thought the idea was sound and asked Athletic Director Frank Howard to start the program with Ibrahim as head coach.

(Continued in Tomorrow’s blog)

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Tuesday, January 2, 2018

January 2nd Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

More Funny Photos Through The Years


(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are a humorous look at Clemson through the eyes of some photographers and students that had a nice sense of humor.

The above picture is of Frank Howard cutting up at a pep rally prior to a football game.

The next photo is from Johnstone Hall in the 1960’s.




The final picture helps answer the age old question of what really is in the mystery meat at Schilletter!




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Monday, January 1, 2018

January 1st Clemson Historic Picture Of The Day

Funny Photos Through The Years



(Photos Uploaded By Alan Cutts)

Today’s photos are a humorous look at Clemson through the eyes of some photographers and students that had a nice sense of humor.

The above photo is a student in the 1960’s and shows a male student “thumbing a ride” while posing with an umbrella.

The next photo is a “for sale” sign on the lawn at the President’s House in Clemson.



And the final photo is from some ROTC Cadets making like an airplane and flying away!



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